STUDY COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

M. Granger Morgan, Chairman, is Head of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy and of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Professor in the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy at Carnegie-Mellon University. He received his bachelor's degree in physics from Harvard College, his master's degree in astronomy and space science from Cornell University, and his Ph.D. in applied physics and information science from the University of California at San Diego. Before coming to Carnegie-Mellon, he was a Visiting Associate Physicist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and before that he was an Associate Program Director and later Program Director in the Division of Computer Research at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Morgan's research areas include risk assessment and communication, and he has prepared several consumer-oriented publications on such environmental risks as radon, electric and magnetic fields, and global warming and climate change. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He is a member of the National Research Council Board on Sustainable Development and the recent National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Risk-Related Studies.

Ann Bostrom is an Assistant Professor at the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She received her M.B.A. at Western Washington University and her Ph.D. in public policy and analysis from Carnegie-Mellon University. Dr. Bostrom's research interests include risk perception and communication, behavioral decision theory, and decision and risk analysis. Before coming to Georgia Tech, she was a Research Associate at the Bureau of Labor Statistics and a Postdoctoral



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Shopping for Safety: Providing Consumer Automotive Safety Information STUDY COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION M. Granger Morgan, Chairman, is Head of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Professor of Engineering and Public Policy and of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Professor in the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy at Carnegie-Mellon University. He received his bachelor's degree in physics from Harvard College, his master's degree in astronomy and space science from Cornell University, and his Ph.D. in applied physics and information science from the University of California at San Diego. Before coming to Carnegie-Mellon, he was a Visiting Associate Physicist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and before that he was an Associate Program Director and later Program Director in the Division of Computer Research at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Morgan's research areas include risk assessment and communication, and he has prepared several consumer-oriented publications on such environmental risks as radon, electric and magnetic fields, and global warming and climate change. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He is a member of the National Research Council Board on Sustainable Development and the recent National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Risk-Related Studies. Ann Bostrom is an Assistant Professor at the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She received her M.B.A. at Western Washington University and her Ph.D. in public policy and analysis from Carnegie-Mellon University. Dr. Bostrom's research interests include risk perception and communication, behavioral decision theory, and decision and risk analysis. Before coming to Georgia Tech, she was a Research Associate at the Bureau of Labor Statistics and a Postdoctoral

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Shopping for Safety: Providing Consumer Automotive Safety Information Research Fellow at Carnegie-Mellon University. She is a member of the American Statistical Association, the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, and the Society for Risk Analysis. Thomas D. Gillespie is Director of the Great Lakes Center for Truck and Transit Research at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI). Before that, he was a Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, a Research Scientist at UMTRI, a Group Leader of Heavy Truck Engineering at Ford Motor Company, a Research Associate at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute, a Research Assistant in Mechanical Engineering at Pennsylvania State University, and an Engineer at the Glass Research Center of PPG Industries. Dr. Gillespie received a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from the Carnegie Institute of Technology and a master's of science and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Pennsylvania State University. His professional career has been primarily concerned with advanced engineering and research in the automotive and highway areas. He is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers and is a registered professional engineer in Pennsylvania. Lindsay I. Griffin III is a Research Scientist at the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) in the Texas A&M University System. An experimental psychologist, Dr. Griffin received his bachelor of arts in psychology and Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of North Carolina. He has held many positions at TTI, including Head of the Safety Division, Head of the Accident Analysis Division, Associate Research Psychologist, Manager of the Traffic Accident Research and Evaluation Programs, and Assistant Research Psychologist. Before that he was Staff Associate at the Highway Safety Research Center at the University of North Carolina and a Teaching Fellow, Teaching Assistant, and Research Assistant in the Department of Psychology. Dr. Griffin is a member of the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine, the American Statistical Association, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. He is Associate Editor of Accident Analysis and Prevention. He was the Study Director at the Transportation Research Board for the Committee To Identify Measures that May Improve the Safety of School Bus Transportation.

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Shopping for Safety: Providing Consumer Automotive Safety Information Albert I. King is Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Wayne State University and Director of the Bioengineering Center. He also serves as Adjunct Professor of Orthopedics and Associate in Neurosurgery. Dr. King was an Adjunct Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Michigan and, before that, an Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Wayne State University. He received his bachelor of science from the University of Hong Kong and his master's degree and Ph.D. from Wayne State University. His professional society memberships include the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Fellow), the Society of Automotive Engineers (Fellow), the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (Associate Member), the American Society of Biomechanics (Member), and the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (Member). Dr. King also served as a member of the Committee on Trauma Research for the National Academy of Sciences. He is the Associate Editor of the Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. Wesley A. Magat is Senior Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Professor at the Fuqua School of Business and Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy at Duke University. He also directs the program on Regulatory Management at the Center for the Study of Business, Regulation, and Economic Policy. He received his A.B. in mathematics and economics from Brown University and his master's degree and Ph.D. in managerial economics and decision sciences from Northwestern University. Dr. Magat taught as an Associate Professor and Assistant Professor at the Fuqua School of Business. His research interests include the economics of regulation, information regulation, and risk regulation. He is a member of the American Economic Association, the Econometric Society, and the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. He also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Regulatory Economics. Roger E. Maugh recently retired after a 37-year career with the Ford Motor Company. Joining Ford in 1957 as a Product Planning Analyst, he held a variety of positions in car and truck planning, marketing, and product development, including Thunderbird Planning Manager, Forward Car Marketing Plans Manager, Ford Car Planning Manager, and Truck Business Planning Manager. He was Assistant Director of Emis-

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Shopping for Safety: Providing Consumer Automotive Safety Information sions and Fuel Economy Certification, Director of Ford's Automotive Safety Office, Executive Director of Worldwide Automotive Planning, Executive Director of Worldwide Technical Strategy, and most recently, Executive Director of Worldwide Automotive Strategy. Mr. Maugh received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan, his master's degree in automotive engineering from the Chrysler Institute of Engineering, and his master 's degree in business administration from the University of Detroit. He recently completed a term as member of the Intelligent Transportation Society of America Coordinating Council, is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers, and is a registered professional engineer in Michigan. R. David Pittle is Vice President and Technical Director at Consumers Union of United States, Inc., a position he has held since 1982. In that capacity he oversees all of the product testing, including testing of automobiles, that forms the basis of the product evaluations published in Consumer Reports. He received his bachelor of science in electrical engineering at the University of Maryland and his master's of science and Ph.D. in electrical engineering at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Pittle was Commissioner of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission from 1973 to 1982, an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Carnegie-Mellon University, an Instructor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin, and an Electrical Engineer at the Goddard Space Flight Center. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the Society for Risk Analysis, the Alliance for Consumer Protection (past President), the Conference of Consumer Organizations, and the Consumer Advisory Panel of Underwriters Laboratories. Allan F. Williams is Senior Vice President for Research at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), where he also held positions as Senior Behavioral Scientist and Social Psychologist. He received his A.B. in psychology from Wesleyan University and his Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University. Before coming to IIHS, Dr. Williams was Project Director at The Medical Foundation, Inc., in Boston, and Alcoholism Research Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. He is the author and coauthor of numerous journal articles and publications in the field of highway safety.