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Biographical Information on Principal Investigator and Advisory Group

Principal Investigator

Lorenz Rhomberg is assistant professor of risk analysis and environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He received his Ph.D. in biology from State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research interests focus on the development and critical analysis of more biologically based methods for human health risk assessment, especially on quantitative methods for cross-species extrapolation of toxic effects, comparative dosimetry, the use of biomarkers, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to address how measures of dose at the ''target-organ" level relate to toxic effects across species and across variations in dosing regime. He has also developed methodologies for quantitative risk assessment of heritable genetic changes and examined the role of species-specific time scales in determining equivalent dose regimes in humans and experimental animals. Current projects focus on distributional representations of uncertainty factors in noncancer risk assessment.

Advisory Group

Arthur J. Barsky is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School and a psychiatrist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, where he supervises the Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Service and is the director of psychosomatic research. Dr. Barsky received an M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. His research interests include somatoform disorders, inter-



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--> B Biographical Information on Principal Investigator and Advisory Group Principal Investigator Lorenz Rhomberg is assistant professor of risk analysis and environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He received his Ph.D. in biology from State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research interests focus on the development and critical analysis of more biologically based methods for human health risk assessment, especially on quantitative methods for cross-species extrapolation of toxic effects, comparative dosimetry, the use of biomarkers, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to address how measures of dose at the ''target-organ" level relate to toxic effects across species and across variations in dosing regime. He has also developed methodologies for quantitative risk assessment of heritable genetic changes and examined the role of species-specific time scales in determining equivalent dose regimes in humans and experimental animals. Current projects focus on distributional representations of uncertainty factors in noncancer risk assessment. Advisory Group Arthur J. Barsky is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School and a psychiatrist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, where he supervises the Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Service and is the director of psychosomatic research. Dr. Barsky received an M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. His research interests include somatoform disorders, inter-

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--> individual variability in symptom reporting among the medically ill, and psychiatric and psychosocial aspects of chronic medical illness. Germaine M. Buck is an associate professor in the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine and an associate professor in the Departments of Gynecology-Obstetrics and Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo. She is also an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany. She received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from SUNY at Buffalo. Dr. Buck's research interests are in reproductive and perinatal outcomes, particularly following environmental exposures. William S. Cain is a professor of surgery (otolaryngology) at the University of California School of Medicine in San Diego. He received a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Brown University. His research areas include environmental health and physiology, chemosensory perception, and the acute health effect of exposure to chemicals. John Doull is professor emeritus in the Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics at the University of Kansas Medical Center. He received a Ph.D. in pharmacology and an M.D. from the University of Chicago. His research interests include general toxicology, toxicity of pesticides, and biological aspects of ionizing radiation. Ernest Hodgson is the William Neal Reynolds Professor in the Department of Toxicology at North Carolina State University. He received a Ph.D. from Oregon State University. His research interests include enzymatic aspects of toxicology, comparative toxicology, and risk analysis. Dr. Hodgson has previously served on the NRC's Committee on Comparative Toxicity of Naturally Occurring Carcinogens. David H. Moore is director of medical toxicology programs for Battelle Memorial Institute's Edgewood Operations. He received a Ph.D. in physiology from Emory University. He has been involved in elucidating the effects of nerve agents on airway smooth muscle, developing the concept of a topical skin protectant, and studying the pharmacokinetics of oximes and anticonvulsants for possible use in treating nerve agent poisoning. Roy Reuter is vice president of Life Systems, Inc. He oversees environmental and health effects research for governmental and private-sector clients. He has a Ph.D. in sanitary engineering and has over 40 years of experience working in the field of environmental engineering. Dr. Reuter

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--> has been involved in 18 major programs on cleanup, conservation, compliance, and pollution prevention for Army environmental offices and laboratories. He was involved in developing the Joint Deployment Toxicology Research and Development Program Plan. He has also been extensively involved in assessments of toxicological data, the collection and analysis of environmental information, and exposure hazard and risk assessments. Ken W. Sexton is the Bond Professor of Environmental Health in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. In addition, he is the director of the Center for Environment and Health Policy. He received a Sc.D. in environmental health sciences from Harvard University. His research interests include the role of science in environmental decision-making; assessment, management, and communication of environmental risks; evaluation of human exposures to toxic agents; and analysis of public policy related to environmental health. Robert E. Shope is professor of pathology, microbiology and immunology, and preventive medicine and community health at the University of Texas at Galveston. He received an M.D. from Cornell University. His research interests include emerging infectious diseases and the epidemiology of arbovirus and rabies virus infections. Ainsley Weston is team leader for molecular carcinogenesis at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). He received a Ph.D. in carcinogen biochemistry from the University of London. His research interests include molecular epidemiology and the development of methods for the detection of genotoxicity and other dosimeters and markers of human internal exposure to carcinogens.

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