Appendix B
Projects in the U.S. Department of Energy's Fine Particulate Research Program

No.   Project Title

Description

I. Ambient PM2.5 Sampling and Analysis

 

1. Upper Ohio River Valley Project

Installation and operation of several ambient PM2.5 speciation monitoring sites in western PA, southeastern OH, and northern WV with the objective of better under-standing the relationship between emissions sources and ambient air quality in the upper Ohio River Valley region. Focused on diurnal and seasonal variations in fine particulate concentrations and composition using an array of discrete (filter-based) and continuous instrumentation. Coordinated with USEPA, local, and state environmental agencies and industry.

2. Regional Site for special Purpose Measurements of PM2.5

Under an Interagency Agreement (IA) with the Tennessee Valley Authority, ambient speciation monitoring will be carried out to investigate the impact of coal-fired electric utility emissions on visibility in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Collaborators include EPRI and the State of Tennessee.

3. Aerosol Research Inhalation Epidemiology Study (ARIES)

As part of the TVA IA, the scope of currently planned air quality measurements at an urban Atlanta, Georgia site will be expanded to support an 18-month epidemiological study. Volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds will be collected along with pollen and spore samples. EPRI, Southern Company and a number of other electric utilities are co-sponsoring the project.

4. Tracer Technology Development and Application

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will continue the development of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology that consists of a suite of tracers, related injection and sampling equipment, and various instruments for field and laboratory analyses of the PFTs. The BNL tracers and equipment will be used as part of the BRAVO project to determine the contributions of regional air pollution sources in both the U.S. and Mexico to regional haze observed in the Big Bend National Park in Texas.



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Review of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy's Research Plan for Fine Particulates Appendix B Projects in the U.S. Department of Energy's Fine Particulate Research Program No.   Project Title Description I. Ambient PM2.5 Sampling and Analysis   1. Upper Ohio River Valley Project Installation and operation of several ambient PM2.5 speciation monitoring sites in western PA, southeastern OH, and northern WV with the objective of better under-standing the relationship between emissions sources and ambient air quality in the upper Ohio River Valley region. Focused on diurnal and seasonal variations in fine particulate concentrations and composition using an array of discrete (filter-based) and continuous instrumentation. Coordinated with USEPA, local, and state environmental agencies and industry. 2. Regional Site for special Purpose Measurements of PM2.5 Under an Interagency Agreement (IA) with the Tennessee Valley Authority, ambient speciation monitoring will be carried out to investigate the impact of coal-fired electric utility emissions on visibility in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Collaborators include EPRI and the State of Tennessee. 3. Aerosol Research Inhalation Epidemiology Study (ARIES) As part of the TVA IA, the scope of currently planned air quality measurements at an urban Atlanta, Georgia site will be expanded to support an 18-month epidemiological study. Volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds will be collected along with pollen and spore samples. EPRI, Southern Company and a number of other electric utilities are co-sponsoring the project. 4. Tracer Technology Development and Application Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will continue the development of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology that consists of a suite of tracers, related injection and sampling equipment, and various instruments for field and laboratory analyses of the PFTs. The BNL tracers and equipment will be used as part of the BRAVO project to determine the contributions of regional air pollution sources in both the U.S. and Mexico to regional haze observed in the Big Bend National Park in Texas.

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Review of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy's Research Plan for Fine Particulates No. Project Title Description II. Emissions Characterization and Plume/Atmospheric Chemistry   5. Plume Study to Characterize Fine Particle Emissions and Secondary Particle Formation As part of the IA, TVA will carry out a study of fine particle formation in the plume of Cumberland Fossil Plant before and after the planned installation of NOx and SO2 emissions reduction equipment. The major emphasis is to gather plume data at various distances downwind from the plant. EPRI and TVA will co-fund this effort. 6. Fine Particulate Characterization and Control for Coal-Fired Boilers McDermott Technology (Babcock & Wilcox) will collect and characterize primary fine particulate and associated trace metal emissions from the 10 Mwe Clean Environment Development Facility. The project is focused on the emission and potential impacts of fine carbon soot from the operation of Low-NOx Burner technology. Co-funding from the Ohio Coal Development Office and McDermott. III. Control Technology Research and Development   7. Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector (AHPC) The University of North Dakota's Energy & Environmental Research Center is developing a novel process for controlling the emission of primary fine particulates that incorporates the best features of an ESP and a bag house. A 9,000 acfm pilot-scale AHPC will be tested on the slipstream of an operating coal-fired utility boiler located in South Dakota during the summer/fall 1999. 8. Second Generation Advanced Reburning for High Efficiency NOx Control Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) is developing a second generation advanced reburning (SGAR) concept for high-efficiency, low-cost Nox control for coal-fired utility boilers. The SGAR technology will be scaled up from 1 × 106 Btu/hr to 10 × 106 Btu/hr. 9. Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR)/ Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Hybrid for NOx Control GPU Generation is carrying out full-scale testing of a combined SNCR/SCR system at their 147 MWe Seward Station near Johnstown, Pa. The combination of SNCR and SCR is expected to allow GPU to achieve a NOx emission target of below 0.40 lb/MMBtu while addressing NH3 slip and associated ammonium sulfate deposition and fouling problems. EPRI, CONSOL, and EPA are cofunding this project. 10. Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction Field Test Program Under a Cooperative Agreement with American Electric Power, DOE is collaborating with the State of Ohio, EPRI, and 13 other electric-utilities in the field testing of SNCR technology at AEP's 600 MW Cardinal Station in Brilliant, Ohio. This represents the largest scale demonstration of SNCR technology on a coal-fired utility boiler in the U.S. Note: Project number 4, the development and application of tracer technology was categorized under Section II, emissions characterization and plume/atmospheric chemistry, in the research plan reviewed by the committee. Source: Supplied to the committee by FETC in June, 1999.