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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Gordon H. Orians is professor emeritus of zoology at the University of Washington in Seattle. He received a Ph.D. in zoology in 1960 from the University of California, Berkeley. From 1976 to 1986 he was director of the Institute of Environmental Studies at the University of Washington. Dr. Orians' research interests are evolution of vertebrate social systems; factors determining the number of species an environment will support on a sustained basis; plant-herbivore interactions; and ecology of rare species. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Martin Alexander is Liberty Hyde Bailey Professor of Soil Science at Cornell University. He has chaired or been a member of a variety of advisory committees to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Research Council, National Institutes of Health, and U.S. Army, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and UNESCO, and has consulted with many private companies on environmental pollu- tion. Dr. Alexander's research interests are in the areas of soil and environ- mental microbiology, and microbial transformations that are of environ- mental or agricultural importance in natural environments. He received a B.S. in 1951 from Rutgers University, and an M.S., in 1953, and Ph.D., in 1955, from the University of Wisconsin. Patrick L. Brezonik is professor of environmental engineering at the Uni- versity of Minnesota and director of the university's Water Resources Research Center. His research interests are the eutrophication of lakes, 165

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166 APPENDIX C nitrogen dynamics in natural water, acid rain, and organic matter in water. He is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and served on the National Research Council's Committee on Inland Aquatic Eco- systems and Committee to Review the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. Previously, he was professor of water chemistry and environmental science at the University of Florida. He obtained a Ph.D. in water chemistry in 1968 from the University of Wisconsin. Grace Brush is a professor in the Department of Geography and Environ- mental Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. She received a B.A. in 1949 from St. Francis Xavier University, an M.S. in 1951 from the Uni- versity of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, and a Ph.D. in 1956 from Harvard University. Dr. Brush's research interests are relations between modern pollen distributions in water and surface sediments and vegetation; set- tling properties of pollen in water; mapping terrestrial vegetation; forest patterns; and estuarine biostratigraphy. Eville Gorham is Regents' Professor of Ecology and Botany at the Univer- sity of Minnesota, with research interests in the ecology and biogeo- chemistry of wetlands, global warming, and acid rain, and the chemistry of lakes and streams. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from Dalhousie University, and a Ph.D. from the University of London. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a G. Evelyn Hutchinson Medallist of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. Anthony lanetos is Senior Vice President and Chief of Program at World Resources Institute. He received an A.B. in biology in 1976 from Harvard University, an M.A. in biology in 1978 from Princeton University, and a Ph.D., also from Princeton University, in 1980. His research interests are the relationships between ecological systems and the atmosphere, and in the use of scientific information in public policy. Arthur H. Johnson received an A.B. in geology in 1970 from Middlebury College, an M.A. in geology in 1972 from Dartmouth College, and a Ph.D. from Cornell University in soil science in 1975. He joined the University of Pennsylvania faculty in 1975 and is currently professor of geology. His research has centered on the biogeochemistry of forest ecosystems, with emphasis primarily on soil-water, soil-atmosphere, and soil-plant inter- actions in montane forests. Dr. Johnson is a member of the Soil Science Society of America and the American Society of Agronomy. He has par- ticipated in several National Research Council activities, including the

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APPENDIX C 167 Committee on Long-Term Trends in Acid Deposition, the Panel on Sources and Effects of Acid Deposition, the Panel on Mechanisms of Lake Acidification, the Trends Committee, the NAS White Paper on Global Change, and the Committee on Biological Markers of Air Pollution Stress in Forests. Daniel V. Markowitz received a B.A. in aquatic biology in 1977 from the University of California at Santa Barbara, an M.S. in marine science in 1979 from University of the Pacific, and a Ph.D. in ecology in 1987 from Kent State University. Dr. Markowitz has more than 15 years of experi- ence in water quality evaluation, aquatic biology, project management, and environmental policy development. He is currently Associate at Malcolm Pirnie, in Akron, Ohio. Stephen W. Pacala is professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University. He is also director of graduate studies for the department associated faculty, Princeton Environmental Institute; and codirector, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Carbon Modeling Center at Princeton. His research interests are plant ecology; global interactions of the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere; math- ematical modeling; and community ecology. Dr. Pacala received his B.A. in 1978 from Dartmouth College and his Ph.D. in 1982 from Stanford University. lohn Pastor received a B.S. in geology in 1974 from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.S. in soil science in 1977 and a Ph.D. in forestry and soil science in 1980 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Pastor is currently professor of biology and senior research associate, Natural Resources Research Institute at the University of Minnesota; adjunct pro- fessor, Department of Ecology and Behavioral Biology, University of Min- nesota; and adjunct professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, also at the University of Minnesota. His research interests are northern eco- systems, nutrient cycling, climate change, forest productivity, timber man- agement, and landscape ecology. Gary W. Petersen is a professor of soil and land resources in the Depart- ment of Agronomy in the College of Agricultural Sciences and codirector of the Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources in the Environmental Resources Research Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. His research interests have been primarily in the areas of pedology, landscape and watershed processes, land use, geographic information systems, and remote sensing. He has worked very closely with the Natural Resources Conservation Service in the areas of mapping, correlation, characteriza-

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168 APPENDIX C lion, and interpretation. He is president of the Soil Science Society of America. Dr. Peterson received a B.S. in soils in 1961, a M.S. in soil chemistry in 1963, and a Ph.D. in soil genesis and morphology in 1965 from the University of Wisconsin. lames R. Pratt is professor of environmental science at Portland State University. His background includes degrees in biology from the Univer- sity of Washington (B.A.) and Eastern Washington University (M.S.), and a Ph.D. in zoology from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni- versity. He was previously on the faculty at Murray State University and Pennsylvania State University, where he was a principal in the Environ- mental Resource Management Program. Dr. Pratt's research interests are microbial ecology, especially the effects of pollutants on microbial com- munities; and the "forgotten" microbes, the protists, including their feed- ing ecology, distribution, and taxonomy. Terry Root is associate professor of natural resources at the University of Michigan. She received a B.S. in 1975 from the University of New Mexico, an M.A. in 1982 from the University of Colorado, and a Ph.D. in 1987 from Princeton University. Her research interests include ecological analyses of the distribution and abundance patterns of species on a continental scale; the physiological constraints on the distribution of wintering birds; influence of global warming on the biogeography of species; large-scale geographic examinations of the structure and composition of communi- ties; applying quantitative information about the biogeography of species to conservation and management problems; and analyzing the ecological causes of rarity and commonness, and their effects on rare and endan- gered species. Michael L. Rosenzweig is professor and former head of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona. He is editor-in-chief of Evolutionary Ecology. He received an A.B. (1962) and a Ph.D. (1966) in zoology from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Rosenzweig uses math- ematical modeling to study species diversity, habitat selection, and popu- lation interactions. With the late Robert MacArthur, he helped found modern dynamical predation theory. His work on desert rodent ecology in the United States and Israel established these systems as valuable models for the investigation of general ecological questions. His isoleg theories of habitat selection and their tests in birds and mammals have been among the first to link the study of behavior to population dynamics and community ecology. Dr. Rosenzweig's recent text, Species Diversity in Space and Time (Cambridge University Press, 1995) synthesizes the pat-

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APPENDIX C 169 terns and processes operating on diversity at scales of up to the entire planet and all of Phanerozoic time. Milton Russell is a senior fellow at the Joint Institute for Energy and Environment, professor emeritus of economics at the University of Tennessee, and collaborating scientist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He was a member of the National Research Council Board on Environ- mental Studies and Toxicology, chairs the Committee to Assess the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO) Program and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences/National Academy of Engineering Joint Committee on Cooperation in the Energy Futures of China and the United States. Dr. Russell served as Assistant Administra- tor for Policy at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 1983 to 1987. His current research activities are concentrated on environmental policy in China and on waste management, especially cleanup of U.S. Department of Energy sites. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Oklahoma in 1963. Susan Stafford is Professor and Department Head of Applied Statistics and Research Information Management, Colorado State University. Her current interests are research information management, applied statistics, multivariate analysis and experimental design, scientific databases, GIS applications, and other data management topics. Dr. Stafford received her Ph.D. in applied statistics in 1979 from the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. PROJECT DIRECTOR David Policansky has a B.A. in biology from Stanford University and an M.S. and Ph.D., biology, from the University of Oregon. He is associate director of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology at the National Research Council. His interests include genetics, evolution, and ecology, particularly the effects of fishing on fish populations, ecological risk assessment, and natural resource management. He has directed approximately 25 projects at the National Research Council on natural resources and ecological risk assessment.

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