Appendix C
Biographies of Committee Members

COMMITTEE ON SOLAR AND SPACE PHYSICS

GEORGE L. SISCOE, Chair, has been a senior research professor at Boston University's Center for Space Physics since 1993. His research interests center around the large-scale organization and dynamics of plasmas and fields in space-solar wind, planetary magnetospheres, and, in particular, Earth's magnetosphere. He is active in research in support of the National Space Weather Program. Earlier, he was on the teaching faculty of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences for 25 years, during 7 of which he served as chair of the department. He was formerly a member of the Space Studies Board, the Board's Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, and chair of NASA's Space Physics Advisory Committee. He is currently a member of the UCAR Advisory Panel for the National Centers for Environmental Predictions and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union.

CHARLES W. CARLSON is a research physicist and senior space fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Carlson has over 30 years experience in magnetospheric and space plasma physics research with over 85 publications. He has also developed many of the plasma instruments currently used in this area of research. These experiments include numerous sounding rockets to study plasma in the auroral zone and equatorial ionosphere as well as the Giotto mission to comet Halley, AMPTE, and Mars Observer. He is currently the principal investigator for the Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) satellite, a NASA small-class explorer (SMEX) mission launched in August 1996 that is providing data on the processes thought to be responsible for producing Earth's aurora. Dr. Carlson is also a coinvestigator on the Wind and POLAR missions.

ROBERT L. CAROVILLANO is a member of the Boston College faculty. In space physics research, Dr. Carovillano has published on a broad spectrum of topics in pure theory and data analysis, including magnetospheric energy theorems and related topics. Dr. Carovillano has served on national advisory committees of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) and has chaired several such advisory committees. Dr. Carovillano has been principal investigator on many research grants and contracts funded by the NSF, NASA, the Office of Naval Research, and the U.S. Air Force. Since July 1994, Dr. Carovillano has been a visiting senior scientist at NASA headquarters in the Office of Space Science. At NASA he has been responsible for the supervision of several programs and research initiatives in space physics but has been most deeply engaged in optimizing mission scientific accomplishments and opportunities.



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Radiation and the International Space Station: Recommendations to Reduce Risk Appendix C Biographies of Committee Members COMMITTEE ON SOLAR AND SPACE PHYSICS GEORGE L. SISCOE, Chair, has been a senior research professor at Boston University's Center for Space Physics since 1993. His research interests center around the large-scale organization and dynamics of plasmas and fields in space-solar wind, planetary magnetospheres, and, in particular, Earth's magnetosphere. He is active in research in support of the National Space Weather Program. Earlier, he was on the teaching faculty of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences for 25 years, during 7 of which he served as chair of the department. He was formerly a member of the Space Studies Board, the Board's Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, and chair of NASA's Space Physics Advisory Committee. He is currently a member of the UCAR Advisory Panel for the National Centers for Environmental Predictions and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. CHARLES W. CARLSON is a research physicist and senior space fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Carlson has over 30 years experience in magnetospheric and space plasma physics research with over 85 publications. He has also developed many of the plasma instruments currently used in this area of research. These experiments include numerous sounding rockets to study plasma in the auroral zone and equatorial ionosphere as well as the Giotto mission to comet Halley, AMPTE, and Mars Observer. He is currently the principal investigator for the Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) satellite, a NASA small-class explorer (SMEX) mission launched in August 1996 that is providing data on the processes thought to be responsible for producing Earth's aurora. Dr. Carlson is also a coinvestigator on the Wind and POLAR missions. ROBERT L. CAROVILLANO is a member of the Boston College faculty. In space physics research, Dr. Carovillano has published on a broad spectrum of topics in pure theory and data analysis, including magnetospheric energy theorems and related topics. Dr. Carovillano has served on national advisory committees of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) and has chaired several such advisory committees. Dr. Carovillano has been principal investigator on many research grants and contracts funded by the NSF, NASA, the Office of Naval Research, and the U.S. Air Force. Since July 1994, Dr. Carovillano has been a visiting senior scientist at NASA headquarters in the Office of Space Science. At NASA he has been responsible for the supervision of several programs and research initiatives in space physics but has been most deeply engaged in optimizing mission scientific accomplishments and opportunities.

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Radiation and the International Space Station: Recommendations to Reduce Risk TAMAS I. GOMBOSI is presently senior editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research—Space Physics. In the mid 1970s he was the first foreign national to do postdoctoral research at the Space Research Institute in Moscow, where he participated in the data interpretation of the Venera-9 and Venera-10 Venus orbiters. A few years later he came to the United States to participate in theoretical work related to NASA's Venus exploration. In the early 1980s he played a leading role in the planning and implementation of the international VEGA mission to Venus and Halley's comet. He played a pioneering role in the development of modern cometary plasma physics. Also, he was among the first scientists to explain the acceleration of pickup ions by self-generated, low-frequency MHD waves. Dr. Gombosi is author or coauthor of about 150 peer-reviewed scientific publications and over 250 presentations. RAYMOND A. GREENWALD is supervisor of the Ionospheric and Atmospheric Remote Sensing Group in the Space Sciences Branch of the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University. He is active in the ISTP community and is widely known for the design and development of the STARE radar system in northern Scandinavia, which studies the circulation of the high-latitude ionosphere. He is also associated with the development of the extensive high-latitude network of HF radars known as SuperDARN and is currently chairman of the international SuperDARN Executive Committee. JUDITH T. KARPEN is a research astrophysicist in the Solar-Terrestrial Relationships Branch of the Space Science Division of the Naval Research Laboratory. Her primary research interests include analytical and numerical modeling of dynamic solar and heliospheric phenomena and applications of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics to solar and astrophysical activity. She has been involved in analysis and interpretation of solar data obtained with the hard X-ray burst spectrometer on OSO-5 and with the NRL X-ray spectrometer (SOLPLEX) and white-light coronagraph (SOLWIND) on board the P78-1 satellite. Since 1984, Dr. Karpen has been a coinvestigator or principal investigator in numerous research projects sponsored by NASA, AFGL, and DOD. She is currently chair of the AAS Solar Physics Division and was a member of the MOWG advising the NASA Solar Physics Branch for several years. GLENN M. MASON is professor jointly in the Department of Physics and the Institute for Physical Science and Technology at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has worked on the development of novel instrumentation that allows determination of the mass composition of solar and interplanetary particles in previously unexplored energy ranges. His research work has included galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, and the acceleration and transport of particles both in the solar atmosphere and in the interplanetary medium. He is principal investigator on the NASA Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft mission and is coinvestigator on energetic particle instruments for the NASA Wind spacecraft and the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. He was formerly chair of the NASA Sun-Earth Connections Advisory Subcommittee (SECAS) and the NASA Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC) and is currently a member of the NAS/NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics. MARGARET A. SHEA has worked in the geophysics division of the Air Force laboratory at Hanscomb Air Force Base since 1964. She has received numerous Air Force awards for superior performance and in 1985 was a recipient of the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Guenter Loeser Memorial Award for outstanding career contributions. She was elected to be an associate of the Royal Astronomical Society (equivalent to fellow) in 1991, and in 1995 she was elected as corresponding member of the International Academy of Astronautics. KEITH T. STRONG is currently the manager of the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory and director of the Space Science Independent Research Program. Also, since 1991 and 1994, respectively, he has been coinvestigator on the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope and deputy principal investigator (science) on the Transition Region & Coronal Explorer. He specializes in the use of diagnostics derived from X-ray lines to characterize the temperature, emission measure, abundances, and dynamics of coronal plasmas to improve our understanding of active regions and how they evolve and produce flares. Dr. Strong served on the Sun-Earth Connection Roadmap

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Radiation and the International Space Station: Recommendations to Reduce Risk Planning Committee (NASA), 1996-1997; the Solar-B Science Definition Team (NASA), 1996-1997; the STEREO Science Definition Team (NASA), 1997; and has been a member of the NRC-CSSP since 1997. He has over 200 publications in refereed journals and over 200 talks and public lectures. RICHARD A. WOLF joined the Rice faculty in 1967, after completing his postdoctoral work at Caltech and serving a year on the technical staff of Bell Laboratories. Although his early research was in theoretical astrophysics, he now works primarily on the plasma physics of the solar system, concentrating on the space near the Earth. He is best known for his work with the Rice Convection Model, which is a large computer code representing plasma motions in Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. For the past 7 years, Dr. Wolf has participated in the development of the Magnetospheric Specification Model that will soon be placed in service at the USAF Space Forecast Center, providing data for reports on space weather. His research group is participating in two national efforts to develop comprehensive research computer models of Earth's magnetosphere. Currently, Dr. Wolf is finishing a book on Earth's magnetosphere. COMMITTEE ON SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH MICHAEL C. KELLEY, Chair, is professor of electrical engineering at Cornell University (1975-present). He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1970. Half of his research effort involves using radar-lidar observatories to measure wind and wave patterns from 30 to several hundred kilometers above the surface of Earth. The rest involves the use of satellites and rockets to carry Cornell instrumentation directly into the space environment to study in detail specific atmospheric phenomena such as thunderstorms and the aurora. Dr. Kelley is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and in 1979 won that society's James B. Macelwane Award. MAURA E. HAGAN is a scientist at the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (1992-present). She received her Ph.D. in physics from Boston College in 1987. Her research interests include the physics of the upper atmosphere; chemical/dynamical coupling between the mesosphere, lower thermosphere, upper thermosphere, and ionosphere; atmospheric tides and waves; electrodynamic coupling between ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma and the neutral thermosphere; global change as it pertains to the upper atmosphere; numerical modeling of the upper atmosphere system; and analysis and interpretation of incoherent scatter radar measurements. Dr. Hagan is a member of the American Geophysical Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. MARY K. HUDSON is a professor in and chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Dartmouth College. Her professional experience includes work as a research physicist at the Aerospace Corporation from 1969 to 1971 and as a research physicist in space physics at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Hudson's research interests include theoretical models of ionosphere plasma phenomena; E and F region irregularities; ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and transport phenomena; and ring current-plasma pause interaction and other planetary magnetospheres. She is a recipient of the Macelwane Award from the American Geophysical Union. NORMAN F. NESS is president and professor of physics at the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark (1987-present). He received his Ph.D. in geophysics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959. His specialty is space physics. His research emphasizes experimental investigation of magnetic fields. Dr. Ness is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He has received the Arthur S. Flemming Medal for the U.S. Government (1968); the Space Science Award, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (1972); and the John Adam Fleming Medal of the American Geophysical Union (1965).

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Radiation and the International Space Station: Recommendations to Reduce Risk THOMAS F. TASCIONE is vice president, Space and Environmental Systems Operations, Sterling Software (1966-present). In this position he is leading an effort to start a commercial space weather forecasting center. He received his Ph.D. in space physics from Rice University (1982). His prior professional experience was with the Department of Defense (1972-1993). As deputy director of the Air Force Weather Service, he served as the focal point on all space weather activities. He co-chaired the interagency committee that initiated and developed the National Space Weather Program (NSWP). He was instrumental in the development of the NSWP Strategic and Implementation Plans. During his Air Force career, Dr. Tascione served as the lead space weather forecaster and architect of the Air Force space weather forecast models program.