Click for next page ( R2


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page R1
NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Committee on Human Rights Scientists arts! Hurnar1 Rights in Chile REPORT OF A DELEGATION NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D. C. 1985

OCR for page R1
NOTICE: This report has been approved by the mem hers of the Committee on Human Rights of the National Academy of Sciences and reviewed by the council of the Academy. - The delegation to Chile was sponsored by the Com- mittee on Human Rights of the National Academy of Sciences and was made possible through the use of general operating funds provided to the committee by the Ford Foundation, the Richard Lounsbery Foundation, the New-Land Foundation, the J. Roderick MacArthur Foundation, the Scherman Foundation, the Stichting European Human Rights Foundation, the National Academy of Sciences, and an individual donor. Available from Committee on Human Rights National Academy of Sciences 2101 Constitution Avenue N.W Washington, D.C. 20418

OCR for page R1
Delegation to Chile BARUCH BLUMBERG, Associate Director for Clinical Research, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, and University Professor of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania CAROL CORILLON, Director, Committee on Human Rights, National Academy of Sciences GERARD DEBREU, University Professor of Economics and Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley ERIC STOVER (Consultant), Staff Officer, Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility, Ameri- can Association for the Advancement of Science . . .

OCR for page R1
Committee on Human Rights ELIOT STELLAR (chair), Institute of Neurological Sciences, University of Pennsylvania (1987~* CHRISTIAN B. ANFINSEN, Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University (1985) LIPMAN BERS, Mathematics Departments, Columbia University and City University of New York Grad- uate Center (1985) GERARD DEBREU, Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley (1987) DANIEL C. DRUCKER, Engineering Sciences Department, University of Florida (1988) GERTRUDE S. GOLDHABER, Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (1987) ROBERT W. KATES, Graduate School of Geography, Clark University (1985) FRANCIS E. LOW, Provost, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1988) DANIEL NATHANS, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University (1988) DONALD S. ORNSTEIN, Department of Mathematics, Stanford University (1988) ROBERT P. PERRY, Institute of Cancer Research, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1986) HELEN M. RANNEY, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego (1986) PETER H. RAVEN, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Missouri (1986) 1V

OCR for page R1
WILLIAM P. SLIGHTER, Materials Science and Engineering, AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey ( 1986 ~ ALBERT J. SOLNIT, Child Study Center, Yale University ( 1986 ~ CHIEN-SHIUNG WU, Department of Physics, Columbia University ~ 1985 ~ ADAM YARMOLIN SKY (Adviser), Kominers, Fort, Schlefer and Boyer, Washington, D. C. ( 1987 CAROL CORILLON, Director *Terms end June 3 0 of the year indicated . v

OCR for page R1

OCR for page R1
Contents PPEFACE BACKGROUND FINDINGS Temporary Detention and Internal Banishment, 7 Exile, 17 Imprisonment, 19 Torture, 21 Desaparecidos--Disappeared People, 30 Infringements on Academic Freedom, 31 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS NOTES APPENDICES A Cases of the Committee on Human Rights in Chile, 49 B Key Human Rights Groups Contacted in Chile, 52 C Professional, Scientific, and Academic Groups Contacted in Chile, 54 D Letter Received by Dr. Restelli, 57 Code of Ethics of the Colegio Medico de Chile with Respect to Torture, 59 vii ix 1 7 37 42 47

OCR for page R1

OCR for page R1
Preface The Committee on Human Rights of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) was created in 1976 in response to increased concern by Academy members about repression of scientists and scientific re- search in many areas of the world. Subsequently, the councils of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) asked to participate in the committee's work. The committee now includes eight members from the NAS, two mem- bers from the NAE, and two members and an adviser from the TOM. Our committee works in behalf of colleagues any- where in the world who are believed to be victims of severe repression: those who have been arrested and are believed to be in danger of being tortured, those who are being held without charges or access to a lawyer, those who have "disappeared," those who are imprisoned, and those who have been banished to internal exile. Because we feel a special sense of responsibility toward our colleagues and due to our limited staff and funds, the committee works only in behalf of scientists, engineers, and medical profes- sionals. However, it is our hope that the actions we take in behalf of these colleagues will also benefit other victims of repression whose cases fall outside our mandate. At present, the commit- tee has cases in about 20 countries, including Czechoslovakia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Poland, Somalia, South Africa, and the Soviet Union. ax