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Information on Committee Members ROY E. SHORE, Ph.D., Dr.P.H., (Chair) is a professor of Environmental Medicine and Director of the Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program at New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Shore received his Ph.D. degree from Syracuse University in 1967 and his Doctorate in Public Health from Columbia University in 1982. His research interests include environmental and occupational epidemiology, radiation epidemiology, and epidemiologic methods. He is on the standing committees on radiation biology/risk assessment of both the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. He has served on several scientific advisory groups for the National Cancer Institute, the Department of Energy, and the Environmental Protection Agency, and on editorial advisory boards of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. BRUCE B. BOECKER, Ph.D., is a former Assistant Director of the inhalation Toxicology Research institute, Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research l:nstitute, in Albuquerque, NM. He is currently a Scientist Emeritus at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Dr. Boecker earned his in Ph.D. in Radiation Biology from the University of Rochester and has conducted research at Lovelace since that time. His research interests lie 2~2

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Information on Committee Members 213 mainly in two broad areas, namely inhalation toxicology and dose- response relationships for long-term biological effects produced by internally deposited radionuclides. He has been particularly interested in the conduct of animal experimentation to develop infonnation that may be used to predict the consequences of accidental exposure to humans and to establish standards that ensure the safe and orderly conduct of activities that may result in release of toxic agents to the environment. His personal research efforts have been associated primarily with the toxicology of airborne matenal associated with different activities in the nuclear filet cycle. This research has spanned broadly from studies of aerosol characteristics as they may influence patterns of deposition, retention, and dosimetry through risk assessments for different nuclear energy systems. Dr. Boecker is also a Certified Health Physicist and has received a Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award from the Health Physics Society. ANDRE' BOUVILLE, Ph.D., is a Senior Radiation Physicist in the Radiation Effects Branch of the National Cancer Institute. He earned the French equivalent of a Ph.D. at the University of Paul- Sabatier in Toulouse. Dr. Bouville's field of interest is radiation dosimetry and the environmental transfer of radionuclides. He has worked for the French Atomic Energy in several capacities including having been Assistant to the Director of Protection. Dr. Bouville was also Scientific Secretary for the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Dr. Bouville is the member of several committees (including Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection) and professional societies such as the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. .

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214 Review of the HTDS Draft Final Report A. BERTRAND BRILL, M.D., Ph.D., is a Research Professor in the Departments of Radiology and Physics at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Brill earned is M.D. at the University of Utah and his Ph.D. in Biophysics at the University of California, Berkeley. He served in the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) in Japan at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in the Statistics and Medicine Departments (1957-59), and as the PHS representative to ABCC until 1964. Dr. grill's specialty is nuclear medicine and his major research areas include radiation leukemogenes, effects of radiation on thyroid function, and effects of diagnostic radioisotope studies, particularly exposures from T-131. Dr. Brill is currently a member of the NCT Task Group studying effects of the Chernobyl Accident on thyroid cancer induction in children. He was a former Medical Director, Division of Radiological Health, US Public Health Service, and a former Professor of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is a member of the Society of Nuclear Medicine Radiation Effects Committee, which he chaired for 10 years, the Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee (MIRD), and the American Thyroid Association. PATRICIA A.H. BUFFLER, Ph.D., is Dean Emerita, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. Her current research interests in epidemiology include studies of leukemia in children, health effects of environmental tobacco smoke and health effects of non-ionizing radiation. She has served on numerous national and international advisory groups including advisory committees to the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Environmental Agency, the Office of the President, the National Research Council and the World Health Organization. Since 1996 she has served as a Visiting Director for the US-Iapan Radiation Effects Research Foundation. She has served as President for the Society of Epidemiologic Research, the American College of Epidemiology, and the international Society for Environmental Epidemiology and

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Information on Committee Members 215 is currently an officer of the Medical Sciences Council of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was awarded the American College of Epidemiology Lilienfeld Award in 1996. She is a Fellow of both the American College of Epidemiology and the Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Sciences. SHARON M. FRIEDMAN, MA, is the {acocca Professor and Director of the Science and Environmental Writing Program, at Lehigh University. She served as Chairperson of the Department of Journalism and Communication at Lehigh from 1986-1995. Her research focuses on how scientific, environmental, technological, and risk issues are communicated to the public. She served as a consultant to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. She co-authored the book Reporting on the Environment: A Handbook for Journalists, which has been translated into ~ ~ languages and widely distributed. She served as a Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer in Brazil and a Bosch Foundation Lecturer in Germany. Professor Friedman is the co- editor of the books, Communicating Uncertainty: Media Coverage of New and Controversial Science, and Scientists and Journalists: Reporting Science as News; Associate Editor of the journal Risk: Health, Safety & Environment. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a member of the Council and Committee on Council Affairs of the AAAS. She is also chairperson of the Department of Energy's Low Dose Radiation Research Program Advisory Committee. Professor Friedman is a charter member of the Society of Environmental Journalists and a lifetime member of the National Association of Science Writers.

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216 Review of the HTDS Draft Final Report SUSAN E. LEDERER, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the School of Medicine, Section of the History of Medicine at Yale University. She received her doctorate in the history of science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. A historian of American medicine, she served as a member of the President's Advisory Co~runittee on Human Radiation Experiments. The author of Subjected to Science: Human Experimentation In America before the Second World War, she has written extensively on issues related to human and animal experimentation. CARL M. MANSFIELD, M.D., is the chairman of the Radiation Oncology Department at the University of Maryland Medical Systems. His research interest has been in the treatment of cancer with emphasis on breast cancer. Dr. Mansfield has done extensive research in radiation dosimetry and brachytherapy. From 1976 to 1983, Dr. Mansfield was the chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Kansas. From 1983 through 1995, Dr. Mansfield was Professor and Chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. From 1995 to 1997, he was the Associate Director of the Radiation Research Program at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Mansfield is a Fellow of the American College of Radiology, the American College of Nuclear Medicine, and the Philadelphia College of Physicians. Dr. Mansfield has served on committees for the National Cancer Institute and the National Research Council. DONALD E. MYERS, Ph.D., is Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the University of Arizona and an adjunct Professor of Hydrology, adjunct Professor of Watershed Management, and a member of the faculty of the Applied Mathematics Program. He is a member of the University's Committee on Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis and the Committee on Global Change. He earned his doctoral degree at the University of Illinois. His research has

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Information on Committee Members 217 included studies pertaining to the environmental restoration project at Los Alamos. He spent sabbaticals at the Centre de Geostatisque in Fontainbleau, France, and Stanford University. He held a visiting appointment at the Universite Paris XTT and at the Centre de Geostatisque. He was a consultant to the National Research Council's BRER Committee on Exposure of the American People to I-131 from Nevada Atomic-Bomb Tests. Dr. Myers was an invited participant in the Project Varenius Workshop (NCGlA) and will be an invited participant in the NCEAS workshop on ecology and spatial analysis in the summer of 1999. DANIEL O. STEAM, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the University of Southern California. Dr. Stram earned his Ph.D. in Statistics from Temple University, and engaged in postdoctoral research in Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health. From 1986-89 has was a member of the Statistics Department of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Japan. Since 1990, Dr. Stram's research interests have focused on clinical research and epidemiology in childhood and adult cancers at the University of Southern California and the Children's Cancer Group. His radiation-related work in Hiroshima and U.S.C. has concentrated on statistical aspects of dosimetry systems used for the A-bomb survivors and for the U.S. Uranium miner cohort study. Dr. S tram is a member of the Board on Radiation Effects Research (BRER) of the National Research Council. ROBERT G. THOMAS, Ph.D., formerly of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a private consultant involved in lectures and workshops concerning the decommissioning, decontamination, and restoration of nuclear facilities. He attended the University of Rochester on a fellowship in radiological physics and subsequently received his Ph.D. in Radiobiology and Biophysics. Dr. Thomas was one of the planners and implementers in establishing the inhalation Toxicology Research institute in Albuquerque. He was

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218 Review of the HTDS Draft Final Report an Assistant Professor at the University of Rochester and an Adjunct Professor at the University of New Mexico. His research interests focused on establishing acceptable guidelines for exposure to radionuclides. He led a team of radiological health experts into Romania, Russia, and the Ukraine immediately following the Chernobyl accident. Dr. Thomas is currently on committees for the National Council for Radiation Protection and Measurements and for the International Commission on Radiological Protection.