Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Robert C. Forney (NAE), Chair, is a retired executive vice president, member of the board of directors, and member of the executive committee of E.I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. During his almost 40-year career with du Pont, he held a wide variety of research, manufacturing, engineering, marketing, and general management positions, the first 27 years of which were in man-made fiber activities. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and serves on the board of several for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Dr. Forney received his B.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering and his M.S. in industrial engineering, from Purdue University.

Edward Aitken is currently a consultant and retired manager of materials development with the General Electric Company. Dr. Aitken has over 35 years of experience in process technology, materials development and systems engineering applications. His expertise is in fabrication, product development and waste management of nuclear materials involving both ceramic and metal systems. Dr. Aitken is a fellow member of the American Ceramic Society, and the American Nuclear Society of which he is a past chairman of the Materials Science and Technology Division. He received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of California-Berkeley in 1950 and a Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from the University of California-Los Angeles in 1954.

Robert Bertucio is an engineer and project manager with SCIENTECH, Inc. His expertise is in probabilistic risk assessment and methods development. Dr. Bertucio has 24 years experience in the area of performance, management, and review of probabilistic safety and risk assessment (PSA/PRA) and has managed PSA programs for the Department of Energy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and national laboratories. He received a B.S. degree in aerospace engineering from Syracuse University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University.

David O. Campbell is a consultant and retired nuclear chemist from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). His expertise includes nuclear fuel reprocessing, radioactive waste processing, solvent extraction of metals, and nuclear waste management. Prior to retirement, Dr. Campbell's research focused on improved methods for treatment of radioactive liquid wastes at the ORNL site. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the American Nuclear Society (ANS). He is the recipient of the ANS Special Award for Advancements in Nuclear Technology in Response to Three Mile Island, author of numerous publications, and holds several



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Alternative High-Level Waste Treatments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Robert C. Forney (NAE), Chair, is a retired executive vice president, member of the board of directors, and member of the executive committee of E.I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. During his almost 40-year career with du Pont, he held a wide variety of research, manufacturing, engineering, marketing, and general management positions, the first 27 years of which were in man-made fiber activities. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and serves on the board of several for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Dr. Forney received his B.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering and his M.S. in industrial engineering, from Purdue University. Edward Aitken is currently a consultant and retired manager of materials development with the General Electric Company. Dr. Aitken has over 35 years of experience in process technology, materials development and systems engineering applications. His expertise is in fabrication, product development and waste management of nuclear materials involving both ceramic and metal systems. Dr. Aitken is a fellow member of the American Ceramic Society, and the American Nuclear Society of which he is a past chairman of the Materials Science and Technology Division. He received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of California-Berkeley in 1950 and a Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from the University of California-Los Angeles in 1954. Robert Bertucio is an engineer and project manager with SCIENTECH, Inc. His expertise is in probabilistic risk assessment and methods development. Dr. Bertucio has 24 years experience in the area of performance, management, and review of probabilistic safety and risk assessment (PSA/PRA) and has managed PSA programs for the Department of Energy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and national laboratories. He received a B.S. degree in aerospace engineering from Syracuse University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University. David O. Campbell is a consultant and retired nuclear chemist from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). His expertise includes nuclear fuel reprocessing, radioactive waste processing, solvent extraction of metals, and nuclear waste management. Prior to retirement, Dr. Campbell's research focused on improved methods for treatment of radioactive liquid wastes at the ORNL site. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the American Nuclear Society (ANS). He is the recipient of the ANS Special Award for Advancements in Nuclear Technology in Response to Three Mile Island, author of numerous publications, and holds several

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Alternative High-Level Waste Treatments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory patents. Dr. Campbell received a B.A. degree in mathematics and chemistry from the University of Kansas City (now University of Missouri at Kansas City) in 1947, and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, in 1953. Melvin S. Coops is currently a consultant to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LANL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and, through the University of Chicago, is a technical reviewer of the Nuclear Technology Program at Argonne National Laboratory. Mr. Coops experience in chemical separations of radioactive materials, actinide metallurgy, and remotely operated processing systems spans more than 40 years. He is an expert in nuclear fuel cycle chemistry using both aqueous methods and pyrochemical techniques. His experience includes separations chemistry of the fission product, lanthanide, and actinide elements, with a special interest in the chemistry, metallurgy, and nuclear properties of the isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Mr. Coops is retired from LLNL but continues to work there part-time. He has been a member of the American Nuclear Society since its inception. He holds a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley and a Sc.D. equivalent from LLNL. Delbert E. Day is the Curators' Professor of Ceramic Engineering at the University of Missouri-Rolla and Senior Investigator of its Graduate Center for Materials Research. His teaching and research have dealt with the structure and properties of vitreous solids (glass) and solid waste recycling. He holds 38 U.S. and foreign patents dealing with glass microspheres, sealing glasses, ceramic dental materials, and oxynitride glasses, and he is a past president of the American Ceramics Society. Dr. Day received a B.S. in ceramic engineering from the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy (now University of Missouri-Rolla), and received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in ceramic technology from Pennsylvania State University. P. Gary Eller is a project leader for the Advanced Technology Group of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and currently manages the research and development effort to provide safe stabilization and storage of nuclear materials under the DNFSB 94-1 program. His expertise is in actinide, environmental, and fluorine chemistry and applications to the nuclear fuel cycle. He has 25 years of research and development experience in nuclear materials and environmental issues, and 11 years of experience in the leadership and management of projects such as radioactive site cleanups and the remediation of nuclear materials. Dr. Eller is a member of the American Chemical Society and the American Nuclear Society and has a host of awards. He has more than 100 journal articles, 3 patents, numerous LANL reports, and several other publications. Dr. Eller received a B.S. degree in chemistry from West Virginia University in 1967 and a Ph.D. degree in inorganic chemistry from Ohio State University in 1971. Rodney C. Ewing is a professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan and an adjunct professor there in the Department of Geological Sciences and at the University of Aarhus in Denmark. His expertise is in mineralogy and materials science, specifically, radiation effects in complex ceramic materials and long-term durability of radioactive waste forms. Dr. Ewing has conducted research in Sweden, France, Germany, Australia, and Japan, as well as the United States. He is a past president of the International Union of Materials Research Societies. He has served on several National Research Council committees. He also has served on the subcommittee on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for the Environmental Protection Agency's National Advisory Council on Environmental Policy and Technology. Dr. Ewing received both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from Stanford University in 1972 and 1974, respectively.

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Alternative High-Level Waste Treatments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory John M. Kerr is a consultant with Innovative Technologies, Inc., in Lynchburg, Virginia. Mr. Kerr retired from Babcock and Wilcox as an Advisory Engineer in 1995. His expertise is in ceramics and chemical engineering specilizing in using ceramic bodies for waste disposal, ceramic fuel-metal compatibility studies, ceramic fuels development and development of fuels fabrication methods, nuclear ceramics, and nuclear fuel cycle studies. He is the author and coauthor of several publications and articles relative to this area of materials research and development. He is a member and fellow of the American Ceramic Society and the American Materials Society. Mr. Kerr received a B.S. in ceramic engineering from the University of Illinois in 1956, and an M.B.A. from Lynchburg College in 1973. Jean'ne M. Shreeve is the vice president for research at the University of Idaho and a professor of chemistry. Her expertise involves the synthesis, characterization and applications of fluoride compounds. She has an extensive background in studies relating to fluoride chemistry and high-temperature fluids. She is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, and the Royal Society of Chemistry. She has authored or co-authored over 290 refereed publications. Dr. Shreeve received a B.A. degree in chemistry from the University of Montana, a M.S. degree in analytical chemistry from the University of Minnesota, a Ph.D. degree in inorganic chemistry from the University of Washington-Seattle, and carried out postdoctoral work in fluorine chemistry at Cambridge University. Minoru Tomozawa is a professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Tomozawa joined the faculty at Rensselaer in 1969, after working for the Nippon Electric Company. He has published extensively in the area of glass science and edited sew eral books on the subject. He is a past chair of the Glass and Optical Materials Division of the American Ceramic Society and a fellow in the American Ceramic Society. Professor Tomozawa's research interests are the structure and properties of glasses and glass-ceramics. His research aims to characterize the structural changes of such glass in a controlled manner and to alter materials properties in a desired manner, lead to glass of improved stability. Professor Tomozawa received a Ph.D. degree in materials science and metallurgy from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968.

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