Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Technical Experts

David E. Clark has taught in the Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering at the University of Florida since 1978 and has been a full professor since 1986. He has conducted research programs in the areas of nuclear waste materials, environmental degradation of glass and ceramics, microwave processing, ceramics, sol-gel processing, coatings, glass, ceramic superconductors and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis that have supported approximately six graduate students each year. Dr. Clark is actively involved in professional organizations including the American Ceramic Society, the National Institute of Ceramic Engineers and the Materials Research Society. In each of these organizations, he has organized numerous symposia and served as primary editor for no less than ten symposia proceedings. He has well over 200 publications across the research areas listed above. In addition to serving as a technical expert for lifts review committee, he has chaired a technical review group that evaluated a compendium on nuclear waste glass for a program managed by Argonne National Laboratories for the Department of Energy (1992-94). Dr. Clark also served as a member of a peer review committee to assess and evaluate the glass-sampling program for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Westinghouse Savannah River (1990-91).

Edward J. Lahoda has over 20 years of experience in process analysis, development, design, and field support. He is responsible for the technical developments of the Westinghouse soil washing and high-temperature thermal desorption technologies. He has chemical process design experience in processing chemical warfare agents, nuclear fuels, high-and low-level nuclear wastes and plasma processing of wastes and plasma production of specialty materials. He has provided field support to operating facilities including the Westinghouse incinerators, nuclear fuels production, steam generator maintenance, soil washing, and thermal desorption operations. He has served on committees at the Savannah River site addressing overall operation of the DWPF and test data validity for DWPF and chaired the ITP Chemistry Review Panel. Dr. Lahoda received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering and an M.B.A. from the University of Pittsburgh. He is also a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

K. K. Sivasankara Pillay is a senior staff member at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. His 35 years of work experience in the nuclear science and technology fields include his tenure as a graduate faculty member at the Pennsylvania State University and as a researcher with considerable success in bringing nuclear technologies to beneficial uses. During the past two decades, he has actively participated in various aspects of waste management associated with fissile materials production activities. He is well conversant with issues relevant to excess fissile materials and



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Alternative High-Level Waste Treatments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Technical Experts David E. Clark has taught in the Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering at the University of Florida since 1978 and has been a full professor since 1986. He has conducted research programs in the areas of nuclear waste materials, environmental degradation of glass and ceramics, microwave processing, ceramics, sol-gel processing, coatings, glass, ceramic superconductors and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis that have supported approximately six graduate students each year. Dr. Clark is actively involved in professional organizations including the American Ceramic Society, the National Institute of Ceramic Engineers and the Materials Research Society. In each of these organizations, he has organized numerous symposia and served as primary editor for no less than ten symposia proceedings. He has well over 200 publications across the research areas listed above. In addition to serving as a technical expert for lifts review committee, he has chaired a technical review group that evaluated a compendium on nuclear waste glass for a program managed by Argonne National Laboratories for the Department of Energy (1992-94). Dr. Clark also served as a member of a peer review committee to assess and evaluate the glass-sampling program for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Westinghouse Savannah River (1990-91). Edward J. Lahoda has over 20 years of experience in process analysis, development, design, and field support. He is responsible for the technical developments of the Westinghouse soil washing and high-temperature thermal desorption technologies. He has chemical process design experience in processing chemical warfare agents, nuclear fuels, high-and low-level nuclear wastes and plasma processing of wastes and plasma production of specialty materials. He has provided field support to operating facilities including the Westinghouse incinerators, nuclear fuels production, steam generator maintenance, soil washing, and thermal desorption operations. He has served on committees at the Savannah River site addressing overall operation of the DWPF and test data validity for DWPF and chaired the ITP Chemistry Review Panel. Dr. Lahoda received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering and an M.B.A. from the University of Pittsburgh. He is also a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. K. K. Sivasankara Pillay is a senior staff member at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. His 35 years of work experience in the nuclear science and technology fields include his tenure as a graduate faculty member at the Pennsylvania State University and as a researcher with considerable success in bringing nuclear technologies to beneficial uses. During the past two decades, he has actively participated in various aspects of waste management associated with fissile materials production activities. He is well conversant with issues relevant to excess fissile materials and

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Alternative High-Level Waste Treatments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory waste management with the U.S. weapons complex. At Los Alamos, he spent the first ten years in areas of nuclear materials management and international safeguards. He is presently with the plutonium facility at Los Alamos helping the facility to achieve its waste 'minimization goals through technology innovations. Dr. Pillay is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and the American Institute of Chemists. He is a member of the American Chemical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management, the Health Physics Society, and the ASTM. He is the author of over 170 publications in the open literature. Until recently, he was an associate editor of the Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry. Dr. Pillay received his B.Sc.(Hons) and M.Sc. degrees in chemistry and physical chemistry respectively from the University of Mysore in India and his Ph.D. in inorganic and radioanalytical chemistry from the Pennsylvania State University. John Roecker is currently an active consultant in the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) privatization program at Hartford, and has more than 39 years of experience in engineering, nuclear operations, and program management. This experience includes radioactive and hazardous waste management, nuclear chemical processing, space nuclear auxiliary power systems, breeder reactors, and commercial nuclear systems. Various companies at the Hartford site have employed Dr. Roecker since 1977. He served as manager of the TWRS Program Integration, deputy manager of defense waste remediation, and assistant to the vice president of environmental and waste management at the Westinghouse Hartford Company. Prior to working at Westinghouse Hanford, Mr. Roecker was employed by Rockwell International and Rockwell Hanford Operations where he served as director of Research and Engineering and as director of Waste Management Programs. He received a B.S. in engineering physics from the University of Illinois. He is a registered professional nuclear engineer and a member of the American Nuclear Society. Ernest F. Ruppe is a retired vice president of petrochemicals of E.I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. During his 39-year career with Du Pont, he served in a variety of engineering, research and development, manufacturing, and business management positions. In addition, he was Du Pont's first director of environmental affairs, was chairman of Du Pont International SA in Geneva, Switzerland, heading the company's European business, and later was responsible for the company's operation of the Savannah River site. He is a member of Columbia University's Engineering Council, and serves on several other nonprofit boards and committees. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from Columbia. Barry E. Scheetz, professor of materials, civil and nuclear engineering at the Pennsylvania State University, is active in research areas dealing with the chemistry of cementitious systems, including environmental remediation by the use of industrial by-products focusing on large-volume fly-ash-based cementitious grouts, nuclear and hazardous chemical waste management, crystal chemistry, and other areas of materials sciences. Among his many accomplishments, he received a national internship from the Argonne National laboratory (1972), was a Visiting Scholar to China (1989), and won the Pennsylvania Governor's Environmental Award for Outstanding Achievement in Innovative Technology (1996). He is a member of the Mineralogical Society of America, the Materials Research Society, the American Ceramic Society, and Sigma Xi. Professor Scheetz has authored about 140 scientific publications, and holds 45 U.S. and foreign patents. He received a B.S. in chemical education from Bloomsburg State College (1967), a M.S. in geochemistry, and a Ph.D. in geochemistry and mineralogy from the Pennsylvania State University (1972 and 1976). Anne Smith, a vice president at Charles River Associates (CRA), specializes in multidisciplinary policy assessment to help manage complex environmental and energy issues.

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Alternative High-Level Waste Treatments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Dr. Smith's expertise is in analyzing costs, risks, and economic impacts of prominent air policy issues of the past decade, including regional haze, particulate matter, and ozone ambient standards, acid deposition, air toxics, global climate change, and emissions trading. She also has extensive experience in assessing risks and setting risk-based priorities for decisions associated with nuclear wastes, underground tanks, food product safety, and transportation. Her clients have included governments, research institutions, trade associations, multi-stakeholder organizations, and power companies. Dr. Smith played a prominent role in policy discussions related to the new PM2.5 and ozone NAAQS, providing influential analyses on their impacts to public health risks, costs, and regional economies. Her testimony was requested by the U.S. Congress in hearings on the new national ambient air quality standards and also on the proposed visibility (regional haze) standards. Prior to joining CRA, Dr. Smith was a vice president and manager of the policy practice at Decision Focus Incorporated. She also served as an economist in the Office of Policy Planning and Evaluation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Smith has a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University, with a Ph.D. minor in engineering-economic systems.

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