lies in which the mother had less than a high school education were rated as having low fine motor skills, and 22 percent were rated as high. In families in which the mother was a college graduate, 18 percent scored low on the fine motor scale, and 46 percent scored high (Table 3–13). There is also substantial variation by race/ethnic category for both fine and gross motor skills. In the fine motor skills tests, Asian children scored highest (49 percent in the high category) and black children scored lowest (41 percent in the low category). For gross motor skills, black children scored highest, with 46 percent in the higher portion of the distribution, followed by 38 percent of Asian children and 37 percent of white and Hispanic children (Table 3–14).

TABLE 3–13 First-Time Kindergartners’ Mean Fine Motor Skills Score and Percentage Distribution of Scores, by Child and Family Characteristics: Fall 1998

 

 

Score Distribution (percent)

Characteristic

Mean Score

Lower

Middle

Higher

Total

6

29

36

35

Child’s Sex

Male

6

31

37

33

Female

6

26

36

38

Child’s Age at Entry

Born Jan.-Aug. 1992

6

20

36

44

Born Sep.-Dec. 1992

6

20

36

44

Born Jan.-Apr. 1993

6

25

37

38

Born May-Aug. 1993

5

34

37

29

Born Sep.-Dec. 1993

5

45

33

22

Mother’s Education

Less than high school

5

42

35

22

High school diploma or equivalent

5

33

36

31

Some college, including vocational/technical

6

25

37

39

Bachelor’s degree or higher

6

18

36

46



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