APPENDIX D

Biographical Sketches

Joan McCord (Cochair) is professor of criminal justice at Temple University. She is an expert in adolescent development and juvenile justice, criminological theory, and social science research methodology. The winner of numerous fellowships and awards throughout her distinguished career, she is a past president of the American Society of Criminology and past chair of the section on crime, law and deviance of the American Sociological Association. She is a former vice chair of the National Research Council's Committee on Law and Justice. Her recent publications include Integrating Crime Prevention Strategies: Propensity and Opportunity and Contemporary Masters of Criminology. She has B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. (sociology) degrees from Stanford University and an Ed.M. from Harvard University.

Cathy Spatz Widom (Cochair) is professor of psychiatry and university professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the New Jersey Medical School. She is a former professor of criminal justice and psychology at the University of Albany, as well as a former faculty member in psychology and social relations at Harvard University and in criminal justice and psychology at Indiana University. She has published extensively on topics that include child abuse and neglect, juvenile delinquency, female criminality, and violence. Her current research interests focus on the intergenerational transmission of violence and the long-term consequences of early childhood abuse and neglect. She received the 1989 behavioral research prize from the American Association for the Advancement of



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 355
JUVENILE CRIME APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches Joan McCord (Cochair) is professor of criminal justice at Temple University. She is an expert in adolescent development and juvenile justice, criminological theory, and social science research methodology. The winner of numerous fellowships and awards throughout her distinguished career, she is a past president of the American Society of Criminology and past chair of the section on crime, law and deviance of the American Sociological Association. She is a former vice chair of the National Research Council's Committee on Law and Justice. Her recent publications include Integrating Crime Prevention Strategies: Propensity and Opportunity and Contemporary Masters of Criminology. She has B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. (sociology) degrees from Stanford University and an Ed.M. from Harvard University. Cathy Spatz Widom (Cochair) is professor of psychiatry and university professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the New Jersey Medical School. She is a former professor of criminal justice and psychology at the University of Albany, as well as a former faculty member in psychology and social relations at Harvard University and in criminal justice and psychology at Indiana University. She has published extensively on topics that include child abuse and neglect, juvenile delinquency, female criminality, and violence. Her current research interests focus on the intergenerational transmission of violence and the long-term consequences of early childhood abuse and neglect. She received the 1989 behavioral research prize from the American Association for the Advancement of

OCR for page 355
JUVENILE CRIME Science and was elected a fellow of the American Psychological Association in 1993. She has served on National Research Council committees on child abuse and family violence interventions and is currently a member of the Committee on Law and Justice. She has Ph.D. (psychology) and M.S. degrees from Brandeis University and a B.S. from Cornell University. Patricia Cohen is a social psychologist-psychiatric epidemiologist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and a faculty member at the Center for Young Children and Families, Teachers College, with a long-term interest in methodological issues. Cohen's methodological work includes the popular text Applied Multiple Regression/Correlation for the Behavioral Sciences, written with Jacob Cohen. Among her widely cited methodological articles are “To Be or Not To Be: The Control and Balancing of Type 1 And Type 2 Errors in Research” and “The Clinician's Illusion,” which demonstrates the biasing effects of sampling on one's understanding of the nature and course of disease. Her current work focuses on an empirical comparison of children in the mental health, special education, substance abuse, juvenile abuse, and social service (foster care) programs in Westchester County, NY, with regard to emotional and behavioral problems, demographic factors, and the course of their problems. She has a B.A. from Hamline University and a Ph.D. in social psychology from New York University. Elizabeth Jane Costello is associate professor of medical psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center and has been a faculty member of the department since 1988. She has served as director for the Psychiatric Epidemiology Training Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She is a member of the American College of Epidemiology and has served as council member and chair in the mental health section of the American Public Health Association. Costello's areas of research interest include developmental epidemiology, life-span developmental psychopathology, mental health services for children and adolescents, and clinical decision making. She has also published numerous works in refereed journals on developmental psychology and epidemiology. She has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of London, an M.Phil, and a B.Sci. from the London School of Economics, and an M.A. from Oxford University. Nancy A. Crowell (Study Director) is staff officer with the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education in the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. She serves on the staff of the Committee of Law and Justice and the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She was the study director for a study of the health and safety

OCR for page 355
JUVENILE CRIME implications of child labor, which produced the report Protecting Youth at Work. She previously staffed studies on violence against women, family violence, risk communication, and policy implications of greenhouse warming. Trained as a pediatric audiologist, she worked in a demonstration project for preschool hearing-impaired children and their families at Ball State University. She also worked on several political campaigns and for a political polling and consulting firm prior to joining the National Research Council staff. She holds B.S. from St. Lawrence University in mathematics and French and an M.A. in audiology from Vanderbilt University. Eugene K. Emory is a professor of psychology at Emory University who specializes in clinical psychology, neuropsychology, and behavioral perinatology. His research focus is on the effects of early stress on behavior, fetal and infant development, and human neuroscience. He was a recipient of the research scientist development award from the National Institute of Mental Health. An editorial board member of the International Journal ofPsychophysiology and Child Development since 1984, he has published numerous research materials including Psychophysiological Responses to Stress During Pregnancy and Salivary Caffeine and Neonatal Behavior. He has a B.S. from Edward Waters College and an M.Ed. and a Ph.D. in clinical and developmental psychology from the University of Florida, Gainesville. Tony Fabelo is the executive director of the Texas Criminal Justice Policy Council, a state agency that conducts research, program evaluations, and strategic planning in criminal justice for the governor and the legislature. He has been with the agency since 1984 and has assisted four governors and six Texas legislatures in the development of criminal justice policies. He has numerous publications to his credit in academic and professional journals and is a well-known keynote speaker in criminal justice forums nationwide. He has Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from the University of Texas at Austin and a B.A. from Loyola University. Lawrence Gary is professor in the School of Social Work at Howard University, where he has been on the social work faculty for 27 years. His long list of publications include five (5) books and monographs, most notably the classic work, Black Men, and has over 90 research articles and chapters in scholarly journals and books. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 1993 outstanding leadership and community service award of the National Association of Black Social Workers. He has a B.S. degree (with high honors) from Tuskegee Institute and M.P.A., M.S.W., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan.

OCR for page 355
JUVENILE CRIME Sandra Graham is a professor in the Department of Education at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include the cognitive approaches to motivation, the development of attributional process, motivation in African Americans, and peer-directed aggression. She was a Ford Foundation postdoctoral minority fellow and was elected to fellow status in the American Psychological Association. She has a B.A. (with honors) from Barnard College, an M.A. in history from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in education from University of California, Los Angeles. John Hagan is professor of sociology at Northwestern University and research fellow at the American Bar Foundation in Chicago. He is a former professor of sociology and law and Killam research fellow at the University of Toronto. His current research focuses on the causes and consequences of delinquency and crime in the life course and on the professional and personal lives of lawyers. In addition to more than 120 published papers on criminological and sociological topics, he has published seven books, one of which, Structural Criminology (1989), received awards from the Society for the Study of Social Problems and the American Sociological Association. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and the American Society of Criminology, a former president of the American Society of Criminology, a research fellow of Statistics Canada, and a fellow of the Canadian Institute of Advanced Research. He served on the National Research Council 's Panel on High Risk Youth. He has a B.A. degree from the University of Illinois and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Alberta. Darnell Hawkins is professor of African-American studies and sociology and a faculty affiliate in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Illinois, Chicago. He has previously served on the faculty of the University of North Carolina and has taught grades three and four in the Detroit public schools. He is currently a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Law and Justice and served on its study of family violence interventions. His publications have featured research on homicide among young African Americans and press coverage of homicide. He has a J.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan, an M.A.T. from Wayne State University, and a B.A. from Kansas State University. Kenneth Land is the John Franklin Crowell professor of sociology at Duke University. He is a social statistician with substantive research interests in criminology, demography, and social indicators/trends. His research contributions to criminology include participation in the articu-

OCR for page 355
JUVENILE CRIME lation and testing of crime opportunity/routine activities theory, the specification and testing of models of crime rate distributions both in cross-sections and over time, and the development and application of the semiparametric mixed Poisson regression approach to models of delinquent/criminal careers. In addition, he has participated in a number of projects to evaluate juvenile justice programs. He has a Ph.D. in sociology with a minor in mathematics and an M.A. in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin and a B.A. from Texas Lutheran College. Honorable Cindy Lederman (Liaison Member) is the Administrative Judge of the Juvenile Court in Dade County, Florida. Previously, she was a leader of the team that created the Dade County Domestic Violence Court and served as the court's first Administrative Judge. Her expertise is in family law. With Susan Schechter she conceived the idea of the Dependency Court Intervention Program for Family Violence, a national demonstration project funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Violence Against Women Grants Office. She is a co-principal investigator of the Miami Safe Start Initiative, a community collaboration to prevent exposure to violence for children under age 6. She has served on numerous commissions of the Florida Supreme Court investigating bias and fairness and was a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Family Violence Interventions. She now serves on the Board of Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. In 1997 she received the Florida governor's peace at home award for her work in the field of domestic violence and in 1999 the William E. Gladstone award, the state's highest honor for children's advocacy. She has a J.D. from the University of Miami School of Law. Daniel S. Nagin (Liaison Member) is a professor of management at the H.J. Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, Carnegie Mellon University, and the research director of the National Consortium on Violence Research. He has written widely on deterrence, developmental trajectories and criminal careers, tax compliance, and statistical methodology. He is a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Law and Justice and is also a coeditor of the widely cited report Deterrence and Incapacitation: Estimating the Effect of Criminal Sanctions on Crime Rate (1978). He is on the editorial board of five academic journals and a fellow of the American Society of Criminology. He has a B.S. in administrative and managerial sciences, an M.S. in industrial administration, and a Ph.D. in urban and public affairs from Carnegie Mellon University. Steven Schlossman is professor and head of the history department and director of the Center for History and Policy at Carnegie Mellon Univer-

OCR for page 355
JUVENILE CRIME sity. His interests include education and criminal justice, particularly issues of race and gender in juvenile justice systems. He also has served as manager of the office of research for the California State Assembly. He has a B.A. (magna cum laude) in history and political science from Queens College, an M.A. in history from University of Wisconsin, an M.A. in education from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University. Mercer Sullivan is associate professor of criminal justice at Rutgers University and senior research fellow at the Vera Institute of Justice in New York. His research interests include the impact of social context on adolescent development and youth crime and the integration of qualitative and quantitative methods. He is a member of the American Anthropological Association and the American Society of Criminology. He has a B.A. from Yale College and a Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University. Honorable Viola Taliaferro is a judge for the Monroe Circuit Court VII, where she handles many juvenile cases. In 1996 she received a service award and the Harrison Centennial Award from the Indiana State Bar Association. She serves on numerous panels and forums, speaking to both professional and community organizations on a wide array of legal issues, including disposition of juvenile court cases. Her published work includes articles on juvenile offenders and waivers of juveniles to adult courts. She has a B.S. from the Virginia State College, an M.L.A. from Johns Hopkins University, and a J.D. from Indiana University School of Law. Richard Tremblay holds a chair in child development and is professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Montréal, and director of the Research Unit on Children's Psychosocial Maladjustment of the University of Montréal, Laval University, and McGill University. He is a member of the National Consortium on Violence Research, Molson fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. For the past 12 years he has directed a program of longitudinal studies addressing the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of children from conception onward, in order to gain a better understanding of the development of antisocial behavior. He has also tested the long-term effects of an intervention program to prevent violent and antisocial behavior. He has a B.A. from the University of Ottawa, an M.Psed. from the University of Montréal, and a Ph.D. in child development and educational psychology from the University of London.

OCR for page 355
JUVENILE CRIME Franklin Zimring is William G. Simon professor of law and director of the Earl Warren Legal Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. His major research interest is the empirical study of law and legal institutions, with special emphasis on criminal violence. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is author or coauthor of The Changing Legal World of Adolescence (1982), Capital Punishment and the American Agenda (1987), The Scale of Imprisonment (1991), The Search for Rational Drug Control (1992), Incapacitation: Penal Confinement and the Restraint of Crime (1995), and Crime Is Not the Problem (1997). He has a B.A. from Wayne State University and a J.S. from the University of Chicago, where he served on the law faculty from 1967 to 1985.

OCR for page 355
JUVENILE CRIME