A

Statement of Task

This study will address general principles, major roles and functions, organizational character, and other relevant aspects of alternative institutional arrangements for facilitating the conduct of research on the International Space Station (ISS). Anticipated research uses include both basic and applied science in biology, chemistry, and physics; environmental science; medicine; engineering; and advanced technology development. Research investigations are expected to be sponsored not only by NASA but also by other public sector entities and the private sector. The study will be directed primarily towards consideration of the U.S. share of the ISS, but within the context of the existing global partnership encompassing Canada, Europe, Japan, and Russia.

NASA will provide a detailed description of the ISS program to form basic reference material for the study. Items covered will include the current basic design and development concept, the current plan for utilization management during the assembly phase, and the current approach to construction of research facilities and equipment for the ISS. NASA will also provide a reference model for a non-government organization that could take on the responsibilities for ISS research utilization management and integration. This model, which will address the goals, principal purposes, and working principles of a such a non-government organization, will serve as a point of departure for the study.

The study will undertake the following tasks:

  1. Review current plans for development and operation of the ISS, anticipated scope of planned R&D activities on the ISS, current and planned NASA ISS ground and flight infrastructure, experience with relevant space-flight or ground-based analogs or precursors to the ISS, and plans for international participation in the ISS program;

  2. Develop basic principles to guide the definition and implementation of appropriate institutional arrangements for facilitating research on the ISS;

  3. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the NASA reference model and other relevant models; and

  4. Identify, to the extent feasible, the most important issues to be considered in selecting an institutional approach in such areas as:

    • the relationship of an institute to a host organization and to funding organizations,

    • governance, oversight and research community input,

    • roles and responsibilities for planning, research prioritization, and investigation selection and funding,

    • roles and responsibilities for hardware design, development, and integration,



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OCR for page 51
INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPACE STATION RESEARCH A Statement of Task This study will address general principles, major roles and functions, organizational character, and other relevant aspects of alternative institutional arrangements for facilitating the conduct of research on the International Space Station (ISS). Anticipated research uses include both basic and applied science in biology, chemistry, and physics; environmental science; medicine; engineering; and advanced technology development. Research investigations are expected to be sponsored not only by NASA but also by other public sector entities and the private sector. The study will be directed primarily towards consideration of the U.S. share of the ISS, but within the context of the existing global partnership encompassing Canada, Europe, Japan, and Russia. NASA will provide a detailed description of the ISS program to form basic reference material for the study. Items covered will include the current basic design and development concept, the current plan for utilization management during the assembly phase, and the current approach to construction of research facilities and equipment for the ISS. NASA will also provide a reference model for a non-government organization that could take on the responsibilities for ISS research utilization management and integration. This model, which will address the goals, principal purposes, and working principles of a such a non-government organization, will serve as a point of departure for the study. The study will undertake the following tasks: Review current plans for development and operation of the ISS, anticipated scope of planned R&D activities on the ISS, current and planned NASA ISS ground and flight infrastructure, experience with relevant space-flight or ground-based analogs or precursors to the ISS, and plans for international participation in the ISS program; Develop basic principles to guide the definition and implementation of appropriate institutional arrangements for facilitating research on the ISS; Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the NASA reference model and other relevant models; and Identify, to the extent feasible, the most important issues to be considered in selecting an institutional approach in such areas as: the relationship of an institute to a host organization and to funding organizations, governance, oversight and research community input, roles and responsibilities for planning, research prioritization, and investigation selection and funding, roles and responsibilities for hardware design, development, and integration,

OCR for page 51
INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPACE STATION RESEARCH roles and responsibilities for data management, archival, and distribution, scope and location of facilities and infrastructure operated by an institute, and capacity to evolve over the long term to support the major goals of the ISS. The study will be performed by an ad hoc task group of 13 individuals whose collective expertise brings knowledge of the kinds of research being planned, the perspectives of the expected research communities involved, and the most likely relevant analogs to an ISS institute. Three three-day meetings will be held. A short report (20-30 pages) will be prepared for delivery to NASA.