C

Biographical Sketches of Task Group Members

CORNELIUS (NEAL) J. PINGS, Chair

Dr. Pings is president emeritus of the Association of American Universities (AAU). He served as president of AAU from 1993 to 1998 and as provost of the University of Southern California from 1981 to 1993. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Pings previously served as professor of chemical engineering and chemical physics, vice provost, and dean of Graduate Studies at Caltech, from which he received a B.S. in applied chemistry and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering. He has been elected as a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is the recipient of numerous awards from organizations such as the American Society for Engineering Education. He served in 1988-1992 as chair of the NRC Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy.

JUDITH H. AMBRUS

Dr. Ambrus is consultant, Space Technology Management Services, with prior experience in the commercial uses of space stations, space station policy, and space technology. As a research chemist at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, she conducted basic and applied research in electrochemistry and led the Electrochemistry Branch, which became the Navy's center of excellence in battery research and technology. At NASA, Dr. Ambrus served as a program manager for chemical and thermal energy conversion in the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. In this capacity she managed all NASA-sponsored research and technology activities, including the initiation and management of the triagency (NASA/DOD/DOE) space nuclear reactor program (SP-100). As assistant director for Space Technology, she managed planning for the utilization of ISS for technology development and later for commercial research and development.

ROBERT J. BAYUZICK

Dr. Bayuzick is a professor of Materials Science and the director of Materials Science at Vanderbilt University. His research for the last several years has been directed towards materials processing under microgravity conditions, with a particular emphasis on the structure and properties of alloys resulting from deep undercooling through containerless solidification. Dr. Bayuzick served on the lead team working on TEMPUS, an electromagnetic levitation facility for the containerless processing of metallic samples in microgravity aboard the space shuttle Columbia. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Microgravity Research.



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INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPACE STATION RESEARCH C Biographical Sketches of Task Group Members CORNELIUS (NEAL) J. PINGS, Chair Dr. Pings is president emeritus of the Association of American Universities (AAU). He served as president of AAU from 1993 to 1998 and as provost of the University of Southern California from 1981 to 1993. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Pings previously served as professor of chemical engineering and chemical physics, vice provost, and dean of Graduate Studies at Caltech, from which he received a B.S. in applied chemistry and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering. He has been elected as a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is the recipient of numerous awards from organizations such as the American Society for Engineering Education. He served in 1988-1992 as chair of the NRC Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. JUDITH H. AMBRUS Dr. Ambrus is consultant, Space Technology Management Services, with prior experience in the commercial uses of space stations, space station policy, and space technology. As a research chemist at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, she conducted basic and applied research in electrochemistry and led the Electrochemistry Branch, which became the Navy's center of excellence in battery research and technology. At NASA, Dr. Ambrus served as a program manager for chemical and thermal energy conversion in the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. In this capacity she managed all NASA-sponsored research and technology activities, including the initiation and management of the triagency (NASA/DOD/DOE) space nuclear reactor program (SP-100). As assistant director for Space Technology, she managed planning for the utilization of ISS for technology development and later for commercial research and development. ROBERT J. BAYUZICK Dr. Bayuzick is a professor of Materials Science and the director of Materials Science at Vanderbilt University. His research for the last several years has been directed towards materials processing under microgravity conditions, with a particular emphasis on the structure and properties of alloys resulting from deep undercooling through containerless solidification. Dr. Bayuzick served on the lead team working on TEMPUS, an electromagnetic levitation facility for the containerless processing of metallic samples in microgravity aboard the space shuttle Columbia. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Microgravity Research.

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INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPACE STATION RESEARCH ANTHONY W. ENGLAND Dr. England is a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Science at the University of Michigan. His research interests are radar studies of glaciers and microwave radiometric studies of snow, ice, freezing soils, and planetary regoliths. Dr. England was a mission scientist for Apollo 13 and 16, flew as a mission specialist on Challenger 's Spacelab 2 mission in 1985, and was program scientist for the Space Station during 1986 and 1987. He is a science advisor to the EROS Data Center and to the Alaska SAR Facility. Dr. England was a member of the Space Studies Board and chair of its Task Group on Research and Analysis Programs. CHARLES A. FULLER Dr. Fuller is professor of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior at the University of California at Davis. His research interests include mechanisms of physiological regulation and adaptation. He teaches in the areas of systemic physiology, biological rhythms and sleep, gravitational physiology, and environmental physiology. He has participated in several U.S. and Russian spaceflight programs. Dr. Fuller was a chair of the NASA Space Station Science and Applications Advisory Subcommittee (1991-1996) and member of the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications Advisory Committee (1993-1996). He is currently on the governing board of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology and the International Society for Gravitational Physiology. RICHARD H. HOPKINS Dr. Hopkins retired in 1999 from the position of senior consultant, Microelectronics, Northrop Grumman Science & Technology Center. He has 30 years of experience in materials and device research, including program management and senior line management positions, most recently as head of the Microelectronics Department at the Northrop Grumman Science and Technology Center. His technical expertise includes crystal growth methods for inorganic, organic, and metallic materials and the application of unique semiconductor, optical, and metal alloys to device fabrication. Dr. Hopkins has published extensively in scientific and technical journals and holds U.S. patents in materials and materials processing. He is president of the Eastern Region of the American Association for Crystal Growth and a fellow of ASM International. ERNEST G. JAWORSKI Dr. Jaworski was a distinguished science fellow of Monsanto Company (retired) and Director of Biological Sciences, with long experience as a scientist and research leader in an industry R&D laboratory. Dr. Jaworski's service at Monsanto included positions as research biochemist (1952-1954), research group leader (1954-1960), scientist (1960-1962), and senior scientist (1962-1970). His research and expertise are in the areas of biological chemistry and molecular biology, including plant cell and tissue culture and genetic engineering biotechnology. Dr. Jaworski has served on three NRC bodies: the Panel on Science and Technology Centers, the Board on Biology, and the Commission on Life Sciences.

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INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPACE STATION RESEARCH MICHAEL J. KATOVICH Dr. Katovich is a professor in the Department of Pharmacodynamics at the University of Florida. His research focuses on hypertension, diabetes (with emphasis on gene therapy approaches), temperature regulation, and the renin-angiotens system, specifically dealing with blood pressure measurements (direct and indirect), vascular smooth muscle preparations, metabolic measurements, and in vivo and in vitro assessment of adrenergic function. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including the International Society for Gravitational Physiology, of which he is currently serving as president (1999-2000). SAMUEL KRAMER Mr. Kramer is the principal of Kramer Associates, Government Operations and Management Consultants. He has extensive experience in management, organization of technical and research operations, evaluations, feedback mechanisms, quality control, and monitoring of programs. Mr. Kramer is a former deputy director and associate director at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He served on the NRC Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable, the select blue ribbon panel for the evaluation of Air Force laboratories, statutory panels for evaluation of state and regional manufacturing extension partnership centers, the BIRD Foundation board of directors (chairman and U.S. representative), and on the staff of the Executive Office of the President. In the Corps of Engineers, he was chief of Air Force Projects and assistant chief of Military Works. He is a registered professional engineer and holds the rank of professorial lecturer in the Department of Engineering Management, the George Washington University. G. PAUL NEITZEL Dr. Neitzel is a professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include hydrodynamic stability of steady and unsteady flows, fluid mechanics of materials processing, flow control, vortex breakdown, and bioreactor fluid mechanics. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is a former member of the NASA Space Station Utilization Advisory Subcommittee. LYLE H. SCHWARTZ Dr. Schwartz is director of Aerospace and Materials Sciences at the Air Force Research Laboratory. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has broad leadership experience in materials research and in coordinating industry and government collaboration in materials engineering. His interests and expertise include government policy for R&D, especially materials R&D. Dr. Schwartz is a former interim director of the Brookhaven National Laboratory, a former director of the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, and a former director of the Materials Research Center at Northwestern University.

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INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPACE STATION RESEARCH JOHN G. STEWART Dr. Stewart, a partner in Stewart, Wright and Associates, Knoxville, Tennessee, has long experience and expertise in public policy and legislative affairs. He has been a Fulbright professor and director of the Georgian-American Institute of Public Administration, Republic of Georgia. He is a former staff director of the Senate Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space and vice president and senior planning officer of the Tennessee Valley Authority. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and a member of NASA's Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. JOHN C. TOOLE Mr. Toole is deputy director for Alliance Programs of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he developed experience and expertise in facilitating collaboration between academic, industrial, and government partners in the use of advanced computing and communications infrastructure. At NCSA, Mr. Toole serves as one of the Deputy Directors focusing on NSF's National Computational Science Alliance program. He manages the technical operation and coordination of Alliance teams throughout the United States. NORMA M. ALLEWELL, Ex Officio Member Dr. Allewell is associate vice president for Sponsored Program and Technology Transfer at Harvard University. She has expertise in molecular biophysics, structural biology, and biochemistry. Her research interests include protein structure, function, and design; macromolecular interactions; and computer modeling. She is a member of the Biophysical Society (president, 1993-1994), American Association for the Advancement of Science (fellow), American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Sigma Xi. Dr. Allewell received a B.Sc. (honors) from McMaster University and a Ph.D. (molecular biophysics) from Yale University. She currently serves on the NRC Committee on Space Biology and Medicine.