Appendix A

Biographical Information on the Committee to Review the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO) Program

Milton Russell is a senior fellow at the Joint Institute for Energy and Environment in Knoxville, Tennessee. He is also professor emeritus at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Russell carries out research in the area of environmental policy decision-making. He is a member of the NRC's Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. He has served on the NRC 's Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and several NRC committees. Dr. Russell was Assistant Administrator for Policy, Planning, and Evaluation at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 1983 —1987. He served as chair of the Oversight Review Board of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program, a program similar in structure and function to NARSTO. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Oklahoma.

Humberto Bravo is head of the environmental pollution section of the Center for Atmospheric Sciences at the National University of Mexico. His research efforts have been directed toward the sources, fate, and control of photochemical air pollution, as well as toward the environmental fuels policy in Mexico. Dr. Bravo participated in the development of several air-pollution laws in Mexico. He is a member of the NARSTO ad hoc committee on quality systems and data management.

Charles E. Kolb is president and CEO of Aerodyne Research, Inc. His research interests include the chemistry and physics of trace atmospheric species and the chemical kinetics and spectroscopy of combustion. Dr. Kolb has served on a variety of NRC committees, including the Committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement, which recommended the research activity being coordinated by NARSTO. He has chaired the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and currently serves on the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. He has a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University.

Allan H. Legge is president of Biosphere Solutions in Calgary, Alberta. He has expertise in the evaluation and assessment of air quality and of the effects of air pollution on forest and agricultural ecosystems; the development, testing, and application of ecologically based biomonitoring systems and techniques; and the evaluation and assessment of ambient air-



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REVIEW OF THE NARSTO DRAFT REPORT: AN ASSESSMENT OF TROPOSPHERIC OZONE POLLUTION–A NORTH AMERICAN PERSPECTIVE Appendix A Biographical Information on the Committee to Review the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO) Program Milton Russell is a senior fellow at the Joint Institute for Energy and Environment in Knoxville, Tennessee. He is also professor emeritus at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Russell carries out research in the area of environmental policy decision-making. He is a member of the NRC's Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. He has served on the NRC 's Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and several NRC committees. Dr. Russell was Assistant Administrator for Policy, Planning, and Evaluation at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 1983 —1987. He served as chair of the Oversight Review Board of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program, a program similar in structure and function to NARSTO. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Oklahoma. Humberto Bravo is head of the environmental pollution section of the Center for Atmospheric Sciences at the National University of Mexico. His research efforts have been directed toward the sources, fate, and control of photochemical air pollution, as well as toward the environmental fuels policy in Mexico. Dr. Bravo participated in the development of several air-pollution laws in Mexico. He is a member of the NARSTO ad hoc committee on quality systems and data management. Charles E. Kolb is president and CEO of Aerodyne Research, Inc. His research interests include the chemistry and physics of trace atmospheric species and the chemical kinetics and spectroscopy of combustion. Dr. Kolb has served on a variety of NRC committees, including the Committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement, which recommended the research activity being coordinated by NARSTO. He has chaired the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and currently serves on the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. He has a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University. Allan H. Legge is president of Biosphere Solutions in Calgary, Alberta. He has expertise in the evaluation and assessment of air quality and of the effects of air pollution on forest and agricultural ecosystems; the development, testing, and application of ecologically based biomonitoring systems and techniques; and the evaluation and assessment of ambient air-

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REVIEW OF THE NARSTO DRAFT REPORT: AN ASSESSMENT OF TROPOSPHERIC OZONE POLLUTION–A NORTH AMERICAN PERSPECTIVE quality objectives and standards. He was principal investigator of the biophysics portion of the Alberta Government/Industry Acid Deposition Research Program. Dr. Legge is currently a member of the EPA's Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) and has served on CASAC panels to review air-quality criteria for nitrogen oxides, ozone, and particulate matter. He has a Ph.D. in genetics and ecology from Oregon State University. Shaw C. Liu is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and director of the Air Resources and Engineering Center. Previously, he was program chief for theoretical aeronomy at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory. He carries out research (modeling and field projects) on trace substances in the atmosphere. He served on the NRC Panel on Global Tropospheric Chemistry, and the National Science Foundation Panel on Tropospheric Chemistry. He has a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Pittsburgh. Jennifer A. Logan is a research associate in atmospheric chemistry with the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences of Harvard University. Dr. Logan conducts research on mechanisms controlling the distribution of ozone and related species in the troposphere. She was a member of the NRC Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and the Committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement. She has a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Gregory J. McRae is the Bayer Professor of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include atmospheric processes responsible for photochemical oxidant formation, uncertainty analysis, and the application of mathematical models to design cost-effective environmental controls. He has a Ph.D. in engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Jennie L. Moody is a research associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Her research activities include atmospheric transport of pollutants and episodic acidification. She has investigated transport and processing of ozone and ozone precursors, as well as local meteorological features affecting chemical measurements. She has a Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Michigan. Warren H. White is senior research associate in the Chemistry Department of Washington University. Dr. White conducts research on atmospheric aerosols and optics, and on observation-based modeling of the formation and transport of various atmospheric pollutants. Dr. White was a member of the NRC Committee on Haze in National Parks and Wilderness Areas. He is a member of the NRC Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter. Dr. White has served on panels of the EPA's Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee to review nitrogen oxides and particulate matter criteria documents. He has a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin.