Appendixes



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Bridging Boundaries through Regional Marine Research Appendixes

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Bridging Boundaries through Regional Marine Research This page in the original is blank.

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Bridging Boundaries through Regional Marine Research A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS Thomas Malone received his Ph.D. in biology from Stanford University in 1971. He currently serves both as a professor at the University of Maryland and as the director of the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory. Dr. Malone is the president of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography and the chair of a United Nations Panel for the Coastal Module of the Global Ocean Observing System. His primary areas of research are phytoplankton ecology, nutrient cycling in aquatic systems, and the dynamics of coastal ecosystems. Brian Baird received his B.A. in environmental studies from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1977. He manages California's Ocean Resources Management Program, featured in the U.S. Pavilion at World Expo 98 held in Lisbon, Portugal. Mr. Baird is chair of the Resources Agency Sea Grant Advisory Panel, co-chair of the NOAA/States Science Working Group, and was a Vice-Chair for the international conference, "California and the World Ocean '97." His primary area of expertise is ocean resource management. Margaret Mary Brady received her M.S. in botany from the University of Rhode Island in 1982. She served as the director of the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management and assistant secretary for the Massachusetts Office of Environmental Affairs from 1993 to 1999. She is currently with the Bureau of Strategic Policy and Technology at the Massachusetts Department of Environ-

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Bridging Boundaries through Regional Marine Research mental Protection. Ms. Brady's expertise is in coastal zone management, including aquaculture, coastal pollution remediation, and wetlands protection regulation programs. Robert Dean received his Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959. He is currently a graduate research professor in the Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Department of the University of Florida, Gainesville. Dr. Dean's research interests include: physical oceanography, coastal engineering, beach erosion problems, sea level changes, and tidal inlets and coastal structures. D. Jay Grimes received his Ph.D. in microbiology from Colorado State University in 1971. He currently serves as the director of the Institute of Marine Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi. Dr. Grimes was the Director of the Sea Grant College Program at the University of New Hampshire from 1987-1990 and was a program manager at the Department of Energy from 1990-1996. Dr. Grimes research interests include the microbiology of waste disposal and environmental contaminants and the microbiological quality of water resources. Susan Henrichs received her Ph.D. from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution-Massachusetts Institute of Technology Joint Program in 1980. She is currently a professor of marine science at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Dr. Henrichs' primary areas of research are organic matter decomposition and carbon and nutrient cycles in the marine environment. John Knauss received his Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California in 1959. He was the Dean of the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography from 1962 to 1987 and the NOAA Administrator from 1989 to 1993. Dr. Knauss is currently a research associate at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and is still associated with the University of Rhode Island. He also serves as the current president of the American Geophysical Union. Dr. Knauss' research interests include ocean circulation, law of the sea, and marine affairs. He is a member of the Ocean Studies Board. John Bradford Mooney, Jr. served in the U.S. Navy for 38 years, 9 as an Admiral. During that time he served as Chief of Naval Research (1983-1987), a position in which he managed the research program for the Navy. From 1981-1983, Admiral Mooney was the Oceanographer of the Navy and Navy Deputy to NOAA where he directed the U.S. Navy Oceanography, Meteorology and Hydrographic Survey organization. Admiral Mooney also served as the President and Managing Director of Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, Inc. from 1989-1992. He is currently an International Consultant, and his interests include

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Bridging Boundaries through Regional Marine Research marine technology and engineering. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Michael Mullin received his Ph.D in 1964 in biology from Harvard University. He currently serves as a professor and research biologist with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) and as the director of the Marine Life Research Group at SIO. Dr. Mullin's research interests include the ecology of marine plankton, especially energetics and population dynamics of zooplankton. Robert O'Boyle received his B Sc. and M Sc. from McGill and Guelph University in 1972 and 1975, respectively. He joined the Department of Fisheries and Oceans at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in 1978 as a stock assessment biologist. Since then, he has conducted assessments on most of the Maritime region's fish resources, including herring, capelin, cod, haddock, pollock, the flatfishes, and more recently, the sharks. In 1987, Mr. O'Boyle became Chief of the Marine Fish Division (MFD) where he directs programs for management of the region's finfish and marine mammal resources. Since 1996, Mr. O'Boyle has served as coordinator of the Regional Advisory Process (RAP) where he is responsible for peer review of the science and advice on the Maritimes Region's finfish, invertebrate and marine mammal resources, on its ocean and habitat management, and on its ocean management practices and approaches. Robert Paine received his Ph.D. in 1961 from the University of Michigan. He currently serves as a professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of Washington. Dr. Paine's research focuses on the ecological processes producing community structure in marine habitats, particularly the rocky intertidal zone. He has examined the roles of predation and disturbance in promoting coexistence and biodiversity. Dr. Paine is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Leslie Rosenfeld received her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography. She is currently a research associate professor at the Naval Postgraduate School and an adjunct scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. She serves on the Research Activities Panel for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Her primary research area is coastal physical oceanography, including such processes as internal waves, tides, and upwelling. NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL STAFF Susan Roberts (Study Director) received her Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Roberts is a program officer for the National Research Council's Ocean Studies Board. Dr. Roberts staffs studies on

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Bridging Boundaries through Regional Marine Research marine resources and health effects of climate change at the National Research Council. Her research interests include marine microbiology, fish physiology, marine biotechnology, and biomedicine. Shari Maguire (Research Assistant) received her B.A. from Miami University in 1994. She currently serves as a research assistant with the Ocean Studies Board. Ms. Maguire is studying biological sciences at the University of Maryland in preparation for medical school.