H— Biographical Sketches

COMMITTEE AND STAFF MEMBERS

LAURA L. CARSTENSEN (Chair), is professor and vice chair of the Department of Psychology at Stanford University and also the Barbara D. Finberg director of its Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Her research focuses on life-span development, gender, and emotion. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Gerontological Society of America, and the American Psychological Society. In 1994, she was president of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology and, in 1996, served as chair of the behavioral sciences section of the Gerontological Society of America. She has received the Richard Kalish award for innovative research and the Stanford University Dean's award for distinguished teaching. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from West Virginia University.

PAUL B. BALTES is a senior fellow (Mitglied) of the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Sciences and director of the Center for Lifespan Psychology of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany. His current research interests include theories and models of human development, interdisciplinary perspectives on gerontology, cognitive aging, and the psychology of wisdom. He is a member of numerous scholarly organizations, including Academia Europaea, the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences, the Gerontological Society of America, the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, and the Society for Research in Child Development. His numerous awards include the International Psychology Award of



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The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research H— Biographical Sketches COMMITTEE AND STAFF MEMBERS LAURA L. CARSTENSEN (Chair), is professor and vice chair of the Department of Psychology at Stanford University and also the Barbara D. Finberg director of its Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Her research focuses on life-span development, gender, and emotion. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Gerontological Society of America, and the American Psychological Society. In 1994, she was president of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology and, in 1996, served as chair of the behavioral sciences section of the Gerontological Society of America. She has received the Richard Kalish award for innovative research and the Stanford University Dean's award for distinguished teaching. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from West Virginia University. PAUL B. BALTES is a senior fellow (Mitglied) of the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Sciences and director of the Center for Lifespan Psychology of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany. His current research interests include theories and models of human development, interdisciplinary perspectives on gerontology, cognitive aging, and the psychology of wisdom. He is a member of numerous scholarly organizations, including Academia Europaea, the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences, the Gerontological Society of America, the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, and the Society for Research in Child Development. His numerous awards include the International Psychology Award of

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The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research the American Psychological Association, the Aristotle Prize of the European Federation of Psychological Associations, the Novartis Prize for Gerontological Research of the International Association of Gerontology, the Robert W. Kleemeier award in recognition of outstanding research in the field of gerontology of the Gerontological Society of America, and honorary doctorates from the University of Jyvasksla, Finland, and the University of Stockholm, Sweden. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Saarland, Germany. DEBORAH M. BURKE is the W. M. Keck distinguished service professor and professor of psychology at Pomona College. Her research investigates aging and cognitive functioning, especially in memory and language, focusing on mechanisms responsible for maintained and impaired language performance in old age. She has written extensively on word retrieval, tip-of-the-tongue experiences, and aging. She received a MERIT award from the National Institute on Aging and several Wig distinguished teaching awards from Pomona College. She currently serves on the editorial board of Psychology and Aging and Cognition and Consciousness . She has served on the National Science Foundation Graduate Panel on Psychology of the National Research Council and is currently on the Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience study section at the National Institutes of Health. She has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Columbia University. CALEB E. FINCH is director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center (NIA) and the Kieschnick professor in the neurobiology of aging at the University of Southern California. His major research interest is inflammatory mechanisms in aging. He is the author of two major books on the biology of aging: Longevity, Senescence, and the Genome (1990) and Chance, Development, and Aging (1999). He chaired the National Research Council's Workshop on Bioindicators of Aging (1999). He received the Robert W. Kleemeier award in 1985 and the Sandoz premier prize in 1995. He participates on 10 editorial and national scientific advisory boards and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Gerontological Society of America. He has a Ph.D. in cell biology from Rockefeller University. REID HASTIE is professor of psychology and director of the Center for Research on Judgment and Policy at the University of Colorado. He taught at Harvard and Northwestern Universities before moving to his present position. His primary research interests are in the areas of judgment and decision making (legal, managerial, medical, engineering, and personal), memory and cognition, and social psychology. He is best known for his research on legal decision making and on social memory and judgment processes. He is currently studying the role of explanations in category concept representations

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The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research (including the effects on category classification, deductive, and inductive inferences), civil jury decision making, the role of frequency information in probability judgments, and the psychology of reading statistical graphs and maps. He has served on review panels for the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, and the National Institute of Mental Health, as well as 12 editorial boards for professional journals. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University. RICHARD J. JAGACINSKI is professor in the Department of Psychology and the Department of Industrial, Welding, and Systems Engineering of Ohio State University. He is a fellow in the Division of Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychologists of the American Psychological Association and of the American Psychological Society. He is an associate editor of the journal Human Factors and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Motor Behavior. He currently serves on the National Research Council's Committee on Human Factors. He has a Ph.D. in engineering psychology from the University of Michigan. HAZEL ROSE MARKUS is the Davis-Brack professor in the behavioral sciences at Stanford University and has been a professor of psychology at that university since 1994. She is also co-director of the Research Institute for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Prior to that, she was a faculty member in the Department of Psychology and a research scientist at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Her research has focused on the role of the self in regulating behavior. She has written on selfschemas, possible selves, the influence of the self on the perception of others, and the constructive role of the self in adult development. Her most recent work in cultural psychology explores the mutual constitution between psychological structures and processes and sociocultural practices and institutions. She has served on the editorial boards of numerous journals and study sections at both the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Science Foundation. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Society and the American Psychological Association. She is also a member of the MacArthur Research Network on Successful Midlife Development. She was elected to the American Academy of the Arts and Sciences in 1994. She has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan. TIMOTHY A. SALTHOUSE is Regents professor of psychology in the School of Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research concerns the effects of aging on various aspects of cognitive functioning, including what is responsible for the adult age-related declines reported in many measures of memory, reasoning, and spatial abilities, as well as the role of experience and knowledge in minimizing the impact of age-related cognitive de-

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The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research clines in work and other real-world activities. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the Gerontological. Society and a member of the Psychonomic Society. He received the APA Division 20 Distinguished Contribution award in 1995, and was named an American Psychological Society William James fellow in 1998. He was editor of the journal Psychology and Aging from 1991 through 1996. He served on the National Research Council's Panel on Human Factors Research Needs for an Aging Population. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Michigan. LARRY R. SQUIRE is a professor of psychiatry, neuroscience, and psychology at the University of California, San Diego as well as a research career scientist at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Diego. He is known for his research on cerebral memory systems, the development of theory related to cerebral memory, and the delineation of the brain-based dichotomy of procedural and declarative memory. He has made contributions toward defining the role of the hippocampus and associated structures in the memory of humans and other primates. He became a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1993 and currently serves on the National Research Council's Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. His honors include a distinguished scientific award from the American Psychological Association, the McGovern award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Lashley award from the American Philosophical Society. In 1994, he served as president of the Society for Neuroscience. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. PAUL C. STERN is study director of the Committee on Future Directions for Cognitive Research on Aging at the National Research Council, a research professor of sociology at George Mason University, and president of the Social and Environmental Research Institute. In his major research area, the human dimensions of environmental problems, he has written numerous scholarly articles, coedited Energy Use: The Human Dimension and Global Environmental Change: Understanding the Human Dimensions, and coauthored the textbook Environmental Problems and Human Behavior. He has also authored a textbook on social science research methods and coedited several books on international conflict issues. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from Clark University.

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The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research RUDOLPH E. TANZI is director of the Genetics and Aging Unit in the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor of neurology at Harvard University. He has been investigating human neurodegenerative disease at the genetic, molecular biological, and biochemical levels since 1980, when he participated in a pioneering study that led to the discovery of the Huntington's disease gene in 1983. Subsequently, he has focused on studies of Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease and went on to isolate the first familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) gene, the amyloid beta protein precursor (APP) in 1986. He was also involved in the subsequent identification of three other Alzheimer genes, presenilins 1 and 2 and alpha2-macroglobulin, and the Wilson's disease gene. He has received numerous awards for his work, including the French Foundation fellowship award; the Pew scholar in biomedical sciences award; the Nathan Shock award; the Metropolitan Life Foundation award for medical research; the Potamkin prize for research in Pick's, Alzheimer's and related disorders; and the Alzheimer's Association T.L.L. Temple award. He has a Ph.D. in neurobiology from Harvard University. KEITH E. WHITFIELD is assistant professor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health at Pennsylvania State University. His current research focuses on individual differences in aging in African Americans. Specifically, current projects include a study of the impact of health and personality on cognitive functioning and a study of health, cognitive, and psychosocial factors in the study of older African American twins. Some recent publications cover the topics of individual differences in aging among African-Americans (International Journal of Aging and Human Development), evaluating a measure of everyday problem solving for use with African-Americans (Experimental Aging Research), and the effect of race and health-related factors on naming and memory (Journal of Aging and Health). He has a Ph.D. in lifespan experimental psychology from Texas Tech University. WILLIAM A. YOST is a professor of hearing science and an adjunct professor of psychology and otolaryngology at Loyola University Chicago. He is also director of the Parmly Hearing Institute at Loyola University. He specializes in psychoacoustics and auditory perception and has conducted research on sound source determination and segregation. He currently serves on the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences of the National Research Council, has served several terms on the Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics, and was a member of the Panel on Classification of Complex Nonspeech Sounds. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Indiana University.

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The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research OTHER CONTRIBUTORS THOMAS D. ALBRIGHT is professor and director of the Systems Neurobiology Laboratories at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, as well as an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He is also adjunct professor of neurosciences and psychology at the University of California, San Diego, and director of the Sloane Center for Theoretical Neurobiology at the Salk Institute. His research is aimed at understanding the neuronal bases of visual perception and visually guided behavior in primates, using physiological, behavioral, and computational approaches. His work has focused on the influence of context on the neuronal representation of visual features and on the neuronal bases of visual perceptual experience. CARL W. COTMAN is director of the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia and professor in the Departments of Neurology and Neurobiology and Behavior at the University of California, Irvine. His research concerns synaptic plasticity and functional stabilization after injury in the mature and aged central nervous system. The goal of this work is to determine the nature of natural healing processes in the nervous system and to develop new therapeutic interventions. DONALD L. FISHER is professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His work involves improving the design of the human-computer interface for older adults. Recently, he has focused on the design of the interfaces that are just now appearing in automobiles and telecommunication systems. More generally, he is interested in the effects of aging on the microstructure of cognition and the implication of these effects for practice. MELISSA L. FINUCANE is a research associate with Decision Research in Eugene, Oregon, and a visiting scholar at the Institute for Cognitive and Decision Sciences at the University of Oregon. Her research interests are in human judgment and decision making, affect, and risk perception. Currently she is studying the way affect helps people to make sense of complex financial and health information and is developing a multidimensional measure of decision-making competence. SHINOBU KITAYAMA is associate professor on the faculty of Integrated Human Studies of Kyoto University in Japan, as well as a visiting associate professor on the Committee on Human Development at the University of Chicago. In his work, he approaches the issues surrounding culture, self, and emotion from a cultural psychological perspective. His research explores the

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The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research ways in which psychological systems and cultural systems constitute each other. In particular, he is currently studying how divergent forms of agency are shaped and maintained by an assortment of cultural processes. DONALD G. MacGREGOR is senior research associate at Decision Research in Eugene, Oregon. His research focuses on risk perception and communication, as well as human judgment and decision making. He is currently studying a number of applied issues in human judgment, particularly issues in behavioral finance and financial decision making. JOHN H. MORRISON is a neurobiologist at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, where he is professor and co-director of the Fishberg Research Center for Neurobiology, Willard T.C. Johnson professor and vice chairman of geriatrics and adult development, and director of the Kastor Neurobiology of Aging Laboratories. His work incorporates very basic neurobiological research on neuronal specialization and the biochemical coding of brain circuits with the application of such principles to human neuropathology, in order to illuminate the cellular events that lead to dementia. Recently, his research has dealt with the neurobiological events that accompany normal aging and the important differences between these events and those that accompany Alzheimer's disease. ELLEN PETERS is a research associate at Decision Research and an adjunct professor at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon. Her research examines the affective and analytical processes underlying the decisions that people make in an increasingly complex world. She studies decision making as an interaction of characteristics of the decision situation and characteristics of the individual. In one line of research, she investigates the conscious and less-than-conscious processes by which affect influences choice. In other work, she examines how aging influences the role of affect in choice. PAUL SLOVIC is a founder and president of Decision Research in Eugene, Oregon. He is also professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. His work involves studies of judgment and decision processes with an emphasis on decision making under conditions of risk. In his research, he examines fundamental issues in the study of preference and choice, as well as the factors that underlie perceptions of risk and attempts to assess the importance of these perceptions for the management of risk in society. SHARI R. WALDSTEIN is associate professor of psychology and director of the behavioral medicine program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She is also research assistant professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Her research applies the principles and

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The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research methods of neuropsychology, behavioral medicine, and psychophysiology to the study of cardiovascular disease. In her work, she examines neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, biomedical, and psychological predictors of neurocognitive performance in older adults and conducts studies of individual differences in the magnitude and patterning of acute cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors.