Conclusions

As a result of its preliminary explorations and discussions, the Committee on Assessment and Teacher Quality has reached five conclusions:

  • Licensure tests are designed to provide useful information about the extent to which prospective teachers possess the literacy and mathematics skills and/or the subject-matter and pedagogical knowledge that states consider necessary for beginning teaching.

  • Teacher licensure tests assess only some of the characteristics that are deemed to be important for effective practice. They are not designed to predict who will become effective teachers.

  • There is currently little evidence available about the extent to which widely used teacher licensure tests distinguish between candidates who are minimally competent to teach and those who are not.

  • Comparisons of passing rates among states are not useful for policy purposes because of the diversity of testing and licensure practices.

  • Test instruments, pass/fail rules, and other licensing requirements and policies that result in large differences in eventual passing rates among racial/ ethnic groups pose problems for schools that seek to have a diverse teaching force.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 19
TESTS AND Teaching Quality: Interim Report Conclusions As a result of its preliminary explorations and discussions, the Committee on Assessment and Teacher Quality has reached five conclusions: Licensure tests are designed to provide useful information about the extent to which prospective teachers possess the literacy and mathematics skills and/or the subject-matter and pedagogical knowledge that states consider necessary for beginning teaching. Teacher licensure tests assess only some of the characteristics that are deemed to be important for effective practice. They are not designed to predict who will become effective teachers. There is currently little evidence available about the extent to which widely used teacher licensure tests distinguish between candidates who are minimally competent to teach and those who are not. Comparisons of passing rates among states are not useful for policy purposes because of the diversity of testing and licensure practices. Test instruments, pass/fail rules, and other licensing requirements and policies that result in large differences in eventual passing rates among racial/ ethnic groups pose problems for schools that seek to have a diverse teaching force.

OCR for page 19
TESTS AND Teaching Quality: Interim Report This page in the original is blank.