About the Authors

Jock Buchanan-Smith (Chair) is professor of animal science at the University of Guelph. He received his Ph.D. degree in animal science from Oklahoma State University. Research interests include utilization of silages by ruminants and digesta passage.


Larry L.Berger is a professor of ruminant nutrition at the University of Illinois. He received his Ph.D. degree in ruminant nutrition from the University of Nebraska. Research interests include low quality roughages, feedlot-feed additives, and bypass proteins.


Calvin Ferrell is research leader of the Nutrition Unit at the Roman L.Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center at Clay Center, Nebraska. He received his Ph.D. degree in nutrition from the University of California at Davis. Research interests include energy and protein requirements of ruminant animals.


Danny G.Fox, since 1977, has been professor of animal science at Cornell University. He received his Ph.D. degree in ruminant nutrition from Ohio State University. Research interests include protein and energy requirements of feeding systems for various cattle types and development of computer models to predict nutrient requirements and performance under widely varying conditions.


Michael Galyean currently is professor of animal nutrition at Clayton Research Center at New Mexico State University, where he has taught since 1977. He received his Ph.D. degree in animal nutrition from Oklahoma State University. Research interests include manipulation of rumen fermentation, metabolic profile of stressed ruminants, nonprotein nitrogen utilization, grain processing for livestock, and rate of passage of nutrients through the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants.


David P.Hutcheson owns and operates Animal Agricultural Consulting, Inc., in Amarillo, Texas. He received his Ph.D. degree in animal husbandry from the University of Missouri at Columbia. Research interests include development of nutrient recommendations for transportation stress, respiratory diseased cattle, and the interaction of nutrition with immunology.


Terry J.Klopfenstein is professor of beef cattle nutrition research at University of Nebraska. He received his Ph.D. degree in nutrition from Ohio State University. Research interests include enhancing nutritional value of low quality forage, crop residues for beef cattle, bypass protein sources for growing beef cattle, and alternative feedstuffs.


Jerry Spears is professor of animal science at North Carolina State University, where he has concurrently served as nutrition coordinator since 1989. He received his Ph.D. degree in animal nutrition from the University of Illinois. Research interests include mineral bioavailability in ruminants, interactions between minerals and ionophores, and anion-cation balance in beef cattle.



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Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle: Seventh Revised Edition, 1996 About the Authors Jock Buchanan-Smith (Chair) is professor of animal science at the University of Guelph. He received his Ph.D. degree in animal science from Oklahoma State University. Research interests include utilization of silages by ruminants and digesta passage. Larry L.Berger is a professor of ruminant nutrition at the University of Illinois. He received his Ph.D. degree in ruminant nutrition from the University of Nebraska. Research interests include low quality roughages, feedlot-feed additives, and bypass proteins. Calvin Ferrell is research leader of the Nutrition Unit at the Roman L.Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center at Clay Center, Nebraska. He received his Ph.D. degree in nutrition from the University of California at Davis. Research interests include energy and protein requirements of ruminant animals. Danny G.Fox, since 1977, has been professor of animal science at Cornell University. He received his Ph.D. degree in ruminant nutrition from Ohio State University. Research interests include protein and energy requirements of feeding systems for various cattle types and development of computer models to predict nutrient requirements and performance under widely varying conditions. Michael Galyean currently is professor of animal nutrition at Clayton Research Center at New Mexico State University, where he has taught since 1977. He received his Ph.D. degree in animal nutrition from Oklahoma State University. Research interests include manipulation of rumen fermentation, metabolic profile of stressed ruminants, nonprotein nitrogen utilization, grain processing for livestock, and rate of passage of nutrients through the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants. David P.Hutcheson owns and operates Animal Agricultural Consulting, Inc., in Amarillo, Texas. He received his Ph.D. degree in animal husbandry from the University of Missouri at Columbia. Research interests include development of nutrient recommendations for transportation stress, respiratory diseased cattle, and the interaction of nutrition with immunology. Terry J.Klopfenstein is professor of beef cattle nutrition research at University of Nebraska. He received his Ph.D. degree in nutrition from Ohio State University. Research interests include enhancing nutritional value of low quality forage, crop residues for beef cattle, bypass protein sources for growing beef cattle, and alternative feedstuffs. Jerry Spears is professor of animal science at North Carolina State University, where he has concurrently served as nutrition coordinator since 1989. He received his Ph.D. degree in animal nutrition from the University of Illinois. Research interests include mineral bioavailability in ruminants, interactions between minerals and ionophores, and anion-cation balance in beef cattle.