G

Biographies of Committee Members

Daniel N. Baker, chair of the committee, is primarily interested in research into plasma physical and energetic particle phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres and in the Earth’s magnetosphere, and he also conducts research in space instrument design, space physics data analysis, and magnetospheric modeling. He was a research associate at the University of Iowa’s Department of Physics from 1974 to 1975 and a research fellow at the California Institute of Technology from 1975 to 1977. In 1977, he joined the physics research staff at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and he became leader of the Space Plasma Physics Group in 1981. From 1987 to 1994, he was the chief of the Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Baker is currently the director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences at the University of Colorado. He has served on several National Research Council (NRC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) committees.

Fran Bagenal is currently the associate chair of the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interests include the synthesis of data analysis and theory in the study of space plasmas. She specializes in the field of planetary magnetospheres, particularly Jovian magnetospheres, and solar corona. Dr. Bagenal received NASA Group Achievement Awards in 1981, 1986, 1990, and 1996. She is currently a member of the National Research Council’s Space Studies Board and the Committee on International Space Programs. She is also an interdisciplinary scientist for the Galileo Project, a coinvestigator for the Voyager Plasma Science Experiment of the Planetary Exploration Division of NASA, and an associate of the Laboratory for Space and Atmospheric Physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder. In addition, Dr. Bagenal is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the American Association of Physics Teachers.

Robert L. Carovillano is a member of the Boston College faculty. In space physics research, Dr. Carovillano has published on a broad spectrum of topics in pure theory and data analysis, including magnetospheric energy theorems and related topics. He has served on national advisory committees of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, NASA, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) and has chaired several such advisory committees. Dr. Carovillano has been a principal investigator on many research grants and contracts funded by the NSF, NASA, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force. He was a visiting senior scientist at NASA Headquarters Office of Space Science. At NASA he was responsible for the



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Assessment of Mission Size Trade-offs for NASA’s Earth and Space Science Missions G Biographies of Committee Members Daniel N. Baker, chair of the committee, is primarily interested in research into plasma physical and energetic particle phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres and in the Earth’s magnetosphere, and he also conducts research in space instrument design, space physics data analysis, and magnetospheric modeling. He was a research associate at the University of Iowa’s Department of Physics from 1974 to 1975 and a research fellow at the California Institute of Technology from 1975 to 1977. In 1977, he joined the physics research staff at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and he became leader of the Space Plasma Physics Group in 1981. From 1987 to 1994, he was the chief of the Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Baker is currently the director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences at the University of Colorado. He has served on several National Research Council (NRC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) committees. Fran Bagenal is currently the associate chair of the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interests include the synthesis of data analysis and theory in the study of space plasmas. She specializes in the field of planetary magnetospheres, particularly Jovian magnetospheres, and solar corona. Dr. Bagenal received NASA Group Achievement Awards in 1981, 1986, 1990, and 1996. She is currently a member of the National Research Council’s Space Studies Board and the Committee on International Space Programs. She is also an interdisciplinary scientist for the Galileo Project, a coinvestigator for the Voyager Plasma Science Experiment of the Planetary Exploration Division of NASA, and an associate of the Laboratory for Space and Atmospheric Physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder. In addition, Dr. Bagenal is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the American Association of Physics Teachers. Robert L. Carovillano is a member of the Boston College faculty. In space physics research, Dr. Carovillano has published on a broad spectrum of topics in pure theory and data analysis, including magnetospheric energy theorems and related topics. He has served on national advisory committees of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, NASA, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) and has chaired several such advisory committees. Dr. Carovillano has been a principal investigator on many research grants and contracts funded by the NSF, NASA, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force. He was a visiting senior scientist at NASA Headquarters Office of Space Science. At NASA he was responsible for the

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Assessment of Mission Size Trade-offs for NASA’s Earth and Space Science Missions supervision of several programs and research initiatives in space physics but was most deeply engaged in optimizing mission scientific accomplishments and opportunities. Richard G. Kron is a professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago, director of the Yerkes Observatory, and head of the Experimental Astrophysics Group, Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory. His research interests include optical studies of galaxies. Dr. Kron’s primary responsibility for the Experimental Astrophysics Group is data system development for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This group is also responsible for building a drift-scan charge coupled device camera that was commissioned at the Yerkes Observatory and then deployed to the ARC 3.5-m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. Dr. Kron’s prior NRC service includes membership on the Steering Committee for the Task Group on Space Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Panel on Cosmology. George A. Paulikas has been at the forefront of advances in space science and space systems, making innumerable technical contributions to national security space systems. He retired after 37 years at the Aerospace Corporation, having joined Aerospace in 1961 as a member of the technical staff, later becoming department head, laboratory director, vice president, and senior vice president. He became executive vice president in 1992. He received the company’s highest award, the Trustees’ Distinguished Achievement Award, in 1981 in recognition of research leading to a new understanding of the dynamics of space radiation and its effect on spacecraft. Dr. Paulikas’s other awards and honors include the Jimmy Doolittle Fellowship Award, the National Reconnaissance Office Gold Medal, the Air Force Space Division Award for Excellence, and the Air Force Meritorious Civilian Service medal, both in 1981 and 1996. R. Keith Raney, Jr., is principal professional staff scientist with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). He is on special assignment in the APL Space Department, where his responsibilities are for new initiatives in microwave remote sensing and satellite system configurations. Prior to his employment at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Raney was at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, where he was chief radar scientist and cofounder of RADARSAT, Canada’s first remote sensing satellite program. He participated in the conceptual design phase of several satellite programs. Pedro L. Rustan, Jr., is retired from the U.S. Air Force. He is experienced in the management of design and integration of advanced technologies. As director for Sensor Integration at the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) from 1989 to 1991, Col. Rustan managed the SPEAR and POAM programs. From 1991 to 1994, Col. Rustan was mission director for BMDO’s Clementine program from inception to full operational capability. He was the director of Small Satellite Development at the National Reconnaissance Office from 1994 to early 1997, where he was responsible for conceptualizing a constellation of smaller imaging spacecraft. Currently, Col. Rustan is a consultant. Among his most recent honors are the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal (1994), the Goddard Space Flight Center Nelson Jackson Award (1995), and the National Reconnaissance Office Medal of Superior Service (1996, 1997). Col. Rustan is a member of the Space Studies Board’s executive committee.