Methods

n = 17 healthy women, aged 18–35 y

Intake was analyzed based on three 4-d diet records.

There was no significant difference in milk content between the two groups.

Plasma vitamin C levels were significantly lower at 7 d pp in the unsupplemented group; at 6 weeks, there was no difference. Serum concentrations were lower in the supplemented group

n = 12 healthy women, aged 18–35 y

Intake based on 4-d diet records

n = 16 low-socioeconomic women; aged 18–32 y

Intake was analyzed based on two 4-d diet records.

There was no significant difference in milk content between the two groups.

Also measured plasma concentration of ascorbic acid—found no significant difference

n = 168 Gambian women

n = 200 healthy nonsmoking mothers and full-term infants

Infants were exclusively fed human milk for at least 3 mo (range 3–12 mo)

Intake based on 7-d food records kept by a subset of mothers

Milk volumes (mL/d) based on 3-d averages were calculated:

790 (510–1,120) at 4 mo lactation

800 (500–1,025) at 6 mo lactation

890 (655–1,100) at 9 mo lactation

n = 25 healthy women aged 20–36 yrs, and their infants

Milk concentration was calculated from estimates of the volume of milk intake of infants and infant intake of vitamin C

n = 12 healthy women; aged 21–35 y

Found significantly lower milk concentration on days 1–6 than on days 13–15 and 28–31

n = 55 women; aged 21–38 y

Found 8% decrease in Vit C milk levels between 7 and 12 mo lactation



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement