TABLE 6-5 Effect of Vitamin E Supplements on Subjects Who Had Been on Basal Diet for 54 Months

Subject

α-Tocopherol Intake (mg/d)

Plasma Tocopherol ± Standard Deviationb (µmol/L)

1

3.0

5.1 ± 1.1

2

7.6a

7.0 ± 0.6

3

9.8a

11.4 ± 1.5

4

12.1a

11.4 ± 1.7

5

16.7a

16.0 ± 0.7

6

39.4a

15.9 ± 4.0

7

57.7a

28.6 ± 1.2

a Intake was estimated from food and vitamin E supplements using conversion factors from Table 6-1.

b Plasma α-tocopherol concentrations were estimated for each individual by averaging the values on days 13, 21, 30, and 138.

SOURCE: Adapted from Horwitt (1960).

weights may be greater in men, women have larger fat masses as a percent of body weight, and thus may have similar requirements.

EAR for Men

 

19–30 years

12 mg (27.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

31–50 years

12 mg (27.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

EAR for Women

 

19–30 years

12 mg (27.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

31–50 years

12 mg (27.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

The RDA for vitamin E is set by assuming a coefficient of variation (CV) of 10 percent (see Chapter 1) because information is not available on the standard deviation of the requirement for vitamin E; the RDA is defined as equal to the EAR plus twice the CV to cover the needs of 97 to 98 percent of the individuals in the group (therefore, for vitamin E the RDA is 120 percent of the EAR). The calculated RDA in milligrams is rounded up.

RDA for Men

 

19–30 years

15 mg (34.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

31–50 years

15 mg (34.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

RDA for Women

 

19–30 years

15 mg (34.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

31–50 years

15 mg (34.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol



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