C

Committee Biographies

William C. Reynolds (Chair) is the Donald W. Whittier Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his BS, MS, and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from Stanford University in 1954, 1955, and 1957 and has been a member of the Stanford faculty of mechanical engineering since 1957. He served as the department chair in 1972-1982 and again in 1989-1993. His research has covered a broad range of experimental, analytical, and computational fluid dynamics and applied thermodynamics. He has played a key role in the establishment of several interdisciplinary research activities at Stanford. He was the founding director of the Institute for Energy Studies at Stanford in 1974-1980 and was co-director of the Stanford Integrated Manufacturing Association (SIMA) in 1990-1993. Dr. Reynolds has been a principal faculty leader in the NASA/Stanford Center for Turbulence Research and is the founding director of the new Center for Integrated Turbulence Simulations. His honors include two Stanford awards for teaching excellence, an American Society of Electrical Engineers (ASEE)/American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) award for contributions to teaching and research, the Fluids Engineering Award of the ASME (1989), the Otto Laporte Prize of the American Physical Society (APS) Division of Fluid Dynamics (1992), the Fluid Dynamics Prize of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics (1999), election as fellow of ASME and APS and associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and election to the National Academy of Engineering (1979) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1994).

Roger E.A. Arndt is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Minnesota. After working in industry on supercavitating underwater rockets and high-speed marine vehicles, he began his academic career at Pennsylvania State University in 1967 with a dual appointment in aerospace engineering and the Garfield Thomas water tunnel of the Applied Research Laboratory. He moved to the University of Minnesota in 1977 as the director of the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. He has also served as the chairman of the Fluid Mechanics Program in the Graduate School. While on loan to the National



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An Assessment of Naval Hydromechanics Science and Technology C Committee Biographies William C. Reynolds (Chair) is the Donald W. Whittier Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his BS, MS, and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from Stanford University in 1954, 1955, and 1957 and has been a member of the Stanford faculty of mechanical engineering since 1957. He served as the department chair in 1972-1982 and again in 1989-1993. His research has covered a broad range of experimental, analytical, and computational fluid dynamics and applied thermodynamics. He has played a key role in the establishment of several interdisciplinary research activities at Stanford. He was the founding director of the Institute for Energy Studies at Stanford in 1974-1980 and was co-director of the Stanford Integrated Manufacturing Association (SIMA) in 1990-1993. Dr. Reynolds has been a principal faculty leader in the NASA/Stanford Center for Turbulence Research and is the founding director of the new Center for Integrated Turbulence Simulations. His honors include two Stanford awards for teaching excellence, an American Society of Electrical Engineers (ASEE)/American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) award for contributions to teaching and research, the Fluids Engineering Award of the ASME (1989), the Otto Laporte Prize of the American Physical Society (APS) Division of Fluid Dynamics (1992), the Fluid Dynamics Prize of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics (1999), election as fellow of ASME and APS and associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and election to the National Academy of Engineering (1979) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1994). Roger E.A. Arndt is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Minnesota. After working in industry on supercavitating underwater rockets and high-speed marine vehicles, he began his academic career at Pennsylvania State University in 1967 with a dual appointment in aerospace engineering and the Garfield Thomas water tunnel of the Applied Research Laboratory. He moved to the University of Minnesota in 1977 as the director of the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. He has also served as the chairman of the Fluid Mechanics Program in the Graduate School. While on loan to the National

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An Assessment of Naval Hydromechanics Science and Technology Science Foundation from 1995 to 1998, he was director of the Fluid Dynamics and Hydraulics Program. His research experience is in aero-and hydroacoustics, cavitation, turbulent shear flows, and vortex flow. His awards include the ASME Fluids Engineering Award (1993) and the Alexander von Humboldt Senior Distinguished U.S. Scientist award. He is a fellow of the ASME and associate fellow of the AIAA. Dr. Arndt received his BCE degree from the City College of New York and his SM and PhD degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. James P. Brooks is director of Business Development for Litton/Ingalls Shipbuilding and is responsible for directing Ingalls marketing activities and bid and proposal efforts. He is also responsible for developing and implementing the Ingalls Strategic Plan and actively participates in the Ingalls internal research and development program. His background is in ship technology development and application and in electrical engineering. Mr. Brooks has been with Ingalls since 1982. He held positions in the Ingalls Aegis shipbuilding engineering and program office organizations in Mississippi and in Washington, D.C. He received two individual awards for excellence in shipbuilding during this time and holds one ship design patent. Previously he was an employee of the Space Physics Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan. Mr. Brooks received a BSEE from the University of Michigan in 1982. He is a member of the American Society of Naval Engineers, the Surface Navy Association, and the Naval Studies Board. Daniel S. Cieslowski has been a private consultant since retiring from the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, two and a half years ago. He earned his BME at Catholic University and has also taken postgraduate classes at American University, George Washington University, and Catholic University in engineering and management. He began his federal career at the Carderock Division as a naval architect, worked as the hydrofoil coordinator for hydromechanics, and then became branch head, Special Systems Branch. Mr. Cieslowski progressed to assistant to the department head for Exploratory Development and then to head of the Ship Dynamics Division. He retired as assistant to the directorate head for Operations at Carderock. Mr. Cieslowski's regular duties and areas of responsibility included seakeeping, maneuvering, stability, and control of naval surface ships, submarines, and craft. His programs addressed characterization of the ocean environment, dynamic evaluation of advanced ship types, design and evaluation of submarine control systems, and vehicle/control system integration. His technical efforts ranged from basic research into vehicle dynamic behavior to the design of trainers for full-scale implementation of control concepts. He was responsible for implementing Navy policies and for planning technical and managerial initiatives in his Division. He has served with ASME, the American Society of Naval Engineers, and the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and is a member of Tau Beta Pi. Donald M. Dix is a consultant to Center for Naval Analyses and the Institute for Defense Analyses. Previously he held positions at the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering, Department of Defense, first as staff specialist for Propulsion (1981-1990) and then as director (until 1999). He has received the Airbreathing Propulsion Award from the AIAA, the Exceptional Civilian Service Award from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and an OSD award for Excellence. Dr. Dix received his SB, SM, and ScD in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Thomas T. Huang is principal scientist-hydrodynamics (1998-present) for Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company. His professional interests are in ship hydrodynamic design, computational and experimental fluid engineering, viscous flow, cavitation, and hydroacoustics. Dr. Huang received his BS in agricultural engineering from the National Taiwan University, his MS in mechanics and hydraulics from the State University of Iowa, and his PhD in applied physics from the Catholic University of America. Dr. Huang has more than 35 years experience in various aspects of hydrodynamics, beginning with his work at the David Taylor Model Basin in 1968. He served as senior research

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An Assessment of Naval Hydromechanics Science and Technology scientist-hydrodynamics and chief hydrodynamist at NSWCCD (1990-1998) and as member and chairman of the Cavitation Committee of the International Towing Tank Conference (1980-1990). He has developed technology to improve the hydromechanical performance of naval ships and submarines. He received the Navy's David W. Taylor Award and is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Fazle Hussain is Cullen Distinguished Professor at the University of Houston, Department of Mechanical Engineering, and is director of the University 's Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Turbulence. His research is in turbulence, vortex dynamics, hydrodynamic stability, and measurement techniques. He is a fellow of the APS, a fellow of the ASME, and an associate fellow of the AIAA. He has received the Fluid Dynamics Prize from the APS and the Freeman Scholar (biennial) award of ASME and was inducted into the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars and the Third World Academy of Sciences, Trieste. Antony Jameson is Thomas V. Jones Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. His research interests are in computational fluid dynamics, optimal design and control, and shock waves, and he is the author of software that is widely used in the aeronautical industry. He received the NASA medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, the AIAA Fluid Dynamics Award, and the Spirit of St. Louis Award from the ASME. Dr. Jameson received his MA and PhD from Cambridge University, England. He is a foreign member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Royal Society, a fellow of the AIAA, and an honorary fellow of Trinity Hall, Cambridge. Reuven Leopold is president and chief executive officer of SYNTEK Technologies, Inc. His primary expertise is in ship design and construction. He received his BSc, MSc, MME, and PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his MBA from George Washington University. Dr. Leopold has served on several industrial advisory boards, and his government service includes having been the technical director of ship design for the U.S. Navy during the 1970s. He has also served as a member of the CNO Executive Panel and the Defense Science Board and as a committee member for various Naval Studies Board efforts. His awards include the Albert A. Michelson Award from the U.S. Navy League, the Harold E. Saunders Award from the American Society of Naval Engineers, and the U.S. Navy's Superior Civilian Service Award. He is a fellow of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and a member of the Royal Academy of Engineering. RADM Malcolm MacKinnon III, USN (retired), is president of MSCL, Inc. His primary interest is in ship design and construction. During his 35-year career in the Navy, he was responsible for the design of two new classes of nuclear submarines. Since then, he has turned to commercial shipbuilding and design, emphasizing the introduction of foreign technology and practices into U.S. shipyards to increase their competitiveness and productivity. He has studied advanced technologies for hull form, composite materials, coatings to reduce friction and marine fouling, electrical power generation, and waste remediation and management for application to new ship designs. He is also active in ocean engineering, especially deep ocean search and recovery, marine salvage, and unmanned undersea vehicles. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. W. Kendall Melville is professor of oceanography and chair of the Graduate Department at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego. He received his BS, BE, and MEngSc degrees from the University of Sydney and his PhD from the University of Southampton, England, where he was a Hawker Siddeley fellow. He came to the United States to the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institution in 1977, spent 11 years as a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1980-1991), and returned to Scripps in 1992. His research interests are in nonlinear surface and internal waves, air-sea interaction, surface wave breaking, and acoustic, optical, and microwave remote sensing. In 1986 he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim

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An Assessment of Naval Hydromechanics Science and Technology Memorial Fellowship for the study of ocean waves. Dr. Melville has served on various committees to review government laboratories and research programs. J. Nicholas Newman is professor emeritus of naval architecture, Department of Ocean Engineering, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His expertise is in marine hydrodynamics, especially theoretical and computational studies applicable to ship hydrodynamics, and he authored the textbook Marine Hydrodynamics. Dr. Newman received his BS and MS in naval architecture and marine engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and also his DSc in theoretical hydrodynamics. His awards include the Royal Institution of Naval Architects Bronze Medal and the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers Davidson Medal. Dr. Newman was the Georg Weinblum Memorial Lecturer (1988-1989) and is a foreign member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. He is a fellow of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. J. Randolph Paulling is professor emeritus of naval architecture, University of California at Berkeley. Previously, he served as chairman of the department and as chairman of the faculty at the College of Engineering. He is a member of the editorial committee of the Journal of Ship Research and a member of the U.S. Coast Guard Scientific Advisory Committee. His awards include the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers David W. Taylor Gold Medal for notable achievement in naval architecture, and he was named as one of four U.S. Eminent Ocean Engineers by the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He is a fellow of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (vice president from 1985 to 1988), a fellow of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Maurice M. Sevik retired from the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, in January 1999 and currently works there as a consultant for the University of Washington. His area of expertise is in quiet navy ships and submarines and in hydrodynamic phenomena yielding vibration and noise. Dr. Sevik received his BS in mechanical engineering from Robert College (Istanbul), his DIC in aeronautics from the Imperial College of Science and Technology (London), and his PhD in engineering mechanics from Pennsylvania State University. At Pennsylvania State University he became a member of the graduate faculty, professor of aerospace engineering, and director of the Garfield Thomas water tunnel. He was named overseas fellow, Churchill College, University of Cambridge, England. In 1972, he became associate technical director and head of the Ship Acoustics Department, David Taylor Model Basin, where he developed stealth technologies for Navy ships, especially submarines, established a new acoustic range in Alaska, implemented major upgrades of acoustic facilities on the East and West Coasts in support of submarine stealth, and developed a major research and test facility at Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. His awards include the American Society of Naval Engineers Gold Medal, the ONR Robert Conrad Dexter Award, the ASME Per Bruel Gold Medal for Noise Control and Acoustics, the Charles B. Martell Award from the National Security Industrial Association, l'Ordre du Mérite from the Government of France, the Presidential Rank award, and the Navy's Meritorious and Superior Civilian Service awards. He was named Distinguished Alumnus by the Pennsylvania chapter of the Acoustical Society of America, and the Acoustic Data Analysis Center building at Carderock bears his name. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Acoustical Society of America and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Robert E. Whitehead retired from federal service in 1997. He began his career in 1971 with the Navy as a research engineer in the Aviation Department of the David Taylor Naval Ship R&D Center at Carderock. He transferred to the Office of Naval Research in 1976 and held a number of positions before becoming director of the Mechanics Division from 1986 until 1989. He then transferred to

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An Assessment of Naval Hydromechanics Science and Technology NASA headquarters, eventually becoming the associate administrator for Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology in 1997. In this position, he led a Research and Technology Enterprise of over 6,000 civil service employees and a similar number of contractors at four research centers with an annual budget of approximately $1.5 billion. During his federal service career, he was awarded both the Presidential Meritorious and Distinguished Executive awards, and at NASA he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Dr. Whitehead earned his BS, MS, and PhD in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute.