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APPENDIX Biographies of Committee Members Eric Schmidt, Chair, joined Novell in April 1997 as chairman of the board of directors and chief executive officer. At Novell, Schmidt is in- volved in all significant operating and strategic decisions for the company and plays a central role in the technical development and management of the company. Dr. Schmidt came to Novell from Sun Microsystems, Inc., where he was chief technology officer and corporate executive officer. In his 14 years at Sun, Dr. Schmidt held a range of progressively more re- sponsible executive positions, earning international recognition as an Internet pioneer. He was also instrumental in the widespread acceptance of lava, Sun's platform-independent programming language. Prior to join- ing Sun, Dr. Schmidt was a member of the research staff at the Computer Science Lab at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). He also held positions at Bell Laboratories and Zilog. Dr. Schmidt has a B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Princeton University and an M.S. in electrical engineering and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Cali- fornia at Berkeley. Terrence McGarty, Vice Chair, is the chairman of the Telmarc Group, LLC, a company he founded in 1984 that invests in and manages several high-tech start-up ventures. He is currently chairman and CEO of Zephyr Telecommunications, an international record carrier, and managing di- rector of CROSSCONNECT, a venture capital company. Dr. McCarty has been active in the telecommunications industry for over 30 years. He was until 1992 a senior vice president at NYNEX and 217

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218 APPENDIX the chief operating officer of NYNEX Mobile, a cellular carrier. Prior to that he was the first head of R&D for NYNEX, during which time he created the organization and conceived and developed one of the first multimedia communications systems and the first network management system using the manager of managers concept. All developments were successfully commercialized. Dr. McGarty also spent 5 years in the CATV business, as group president at Warner Communications, and 6 years in the satellite communications business as a division director and general manager of COMSAT's first nonregulated businesses. While at Warner Communications, Dr. McGarty developed and implemented the first video-on-demand cable-telco videotex system in the United States, which is the predecessor of all interactive multimedia cable/telco systems. His early career was as a faculty member and research staff member at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was involved in research in communications and imaging systems as well as microeconomic policy development. Dr. McGarty is also very active in the ongoing development of tele- communications policy and is internationally known for his policy devel- opment work in this area. He has served in many government advisory roles, specifically as senior advisor to the U.S. negotiating team on the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty during the Carter Administration. He has also advised the Defense Department, the Energy Department, the State Department, and the Transportation Department. Dr. McGarty holds a Ph.D. from MIT in electrical engineering as well as his two other degrees and also studied medicine in the joint Harvard/ MIT program. He is the author of four books on random process theory, business planning, and telecommunications policy and over 75 profes- sional papers in areas from telecommunications to law to radiology and medical imaging. He sits on the boards of several companies, including MDSI, a publicly traded company. Anthony S. Acampora is a professor of electrical and computer engi- neering at the University of California at San Diego, which he joined in 1995. There he is involved in numerous research projects addressing various issues at the cutting edge of telecommunication networks, includ- ing the Internet, ATM, broadband wireless access, network management, and dense wavelength division multiplexing. From 1995 through 1999, he was director of UCSD's Center for Wireless Communications, respon- sible for an industrially funded research effort that included circuits, sig- nal processing, smart antennas, basic communication theory, wireless tele- communications networks, infrastructure for wireless communications, and software for mobility. Before that, Prof. Acampora taught electrical engineering at Colum-

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APPENDIX 219 bia University, which he joined in 1988, and was director of its Center for Telecommunications Research, a national engineering research facility. He was involved in research and education programs on broadband net- works, wireless access networks, network management, optical networks, and multimedia applications. For 20 years before that he was at AT&T Bell Laboratories, most of the time in basic research, where his interests included radio and satellite communications, local and metropolitan area networks, packet switch- ing, wireless access systems, and light-wave networks. His last position at Bell Labs was as director of the Transmission Technology Laboratory, where he was responsible for a wide range of projects, including broad- band networks, image communications, and digital signal processing. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a former member of the IEEE Communi- cation Society Board of Governors. Prof. Acampora has published over 160 papers, holds 30 patents, and has authored a textbook entitled "An Introduction to Broadband Networks: MANs, ATM, B-ISDN, Self Rout- ing Switches, Optical Networks, and Network Control for Voice, Data, Image and HDTV Telecommunications." He sits on numerous telecom- munications advisory committees and frequently serves as a consultant to government and industry. Walter S. Baer is a senior policy analyst at the RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California. He directs research on interactive media, tele- communications, and information infrastructure developments, as well as on the public policy and business implications of new communica- tions, information, and educational technologies. Dr. Baer was appointed in 1994 to the Governor's Council on Information Technology for the state of California. He currently chairs the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference and serves on the IEEE Committee on Communica- tions and Information Policy and the editorial board of Telecommunica- tions Policy, as well as on the advisory boards of the U.S. Committee for the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, the Columbia University Institute for Tele-Information, the Los Angeles Learning Cen- ter Network Project, and the Children's Partnership. He holds a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin. Fred Baker has worked in the telecommunications industry since 1978, building statistical multiplexors, terminal servers, bridges, and rout- ers. At Cisco Systems, his primary interest is the management of conges- tion for best-effort and real-time traffic. In addition to product develop- ment, as a Cisco fellow he advises senior management of industry

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220 APPENDIX directions and appropriate corporate strategies. His principal standards contributions have been to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), but he has contributed to the International Telecommunication Union's H.323 and to such industry consortia as WINSOCK II and the ATM Fo- rum. In the IETF, he has contributed to Network Management, Routing, PPP, and Frame Relay, the int-serv and diff-serv architectures, and the RSVP signaling protocol. In addition to being a technical contributor, he currently serves as the IETF chair. Andrew Blau is a program designer and strategist working with foun- dations and other organizations developing programs at the intersection of technology and society. Building on 15 years as a policy analyst fo- cused on the social and policy impacts of the Internet, telecommunica- tions networks, and digital media, he launched Flanerie Works in 2000 to help foundations better incorporate these technologies and their effects into their work. Current or recent clients include the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Paul G. Allen Foundation, the Surdna Foun- dation, and the Carnegie Corporation. Previously, Mr. Blau was program director at the Markle Foundation, and prior to that he directed the Benton Foundation's program in commu- nications policy and practice. He also analyzed federal and state telecom- munications and Internet policy for leading public interest groups includ- ing the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the United Church of Christ's communications policy program. In 1991, he spent a year as a senior member of the research staff at the Columbia Institute for Tele-Informa- tion (CITI). At the request of the Clinton Administration, Mr. Blau was the princi- pal organizer of the first national meeting to bring together leaders from nonprofits, foundations, and the White House to discuss public interest policies in communications. He has testified before Congress about the role of nonprofits in the information age, participated in scores of regula- tory proceedings before federal and state regulatory agencies, and pub- lished and lectured internationally on developments in U.S. telecommu- nications policy. He is a member of the Program Committee for the 2001 Telecommunications Policy Research Conference and has been an advi- sor on technology projects to many organizations, including the U.S. De- partment of Health and Human Services, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the City of Seattle, and the Microsoft Corporation. Deborah Estrin is a professor of computer science at the University of California at Los Angeles. From 1986 to 2000, she was on the faculty of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. In 1987, Dr. Estrin received the National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Presidential Young Investigator Award. She is a codesigner of the PIM and RSVP protocols,

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APPENDIX 221 and her current research interests include multicast, self-configuring sys- tems, and scaling issues in general. Dr. Estrin received her Ph.D. (1985) and M.S. (1982) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her B.S. (1980) from the University of California at Berkeley. She is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery, IEEE, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has served on several panels for the National Science Foundation, on the National Research Council's Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB), and as a member of DARPA's Information Science and Technology Study Group (ISAT). She currently chairs a CSTB study on networked embed- ded computing. Christian Huitema is the architect in the Windows Networking & Communications group at Microsoft, a group responsible for networking support for Windows. From 1996 to 2000, he was the chief scientist in Telcordia's Internet Architecture research laboratory, where he worked on Internet telephony and Internet quality of service. Before joining Telcordia, he was a senior scientist at INRIA in France, leading a network- ing research project that investigated innovative applications, such as video on the Internet, and innovative technologies, from directories to protocol compilers. He is the author of several books (among them, Rout- ing on the Internet and IPV6: The New Internet Protocol), a former member of the Internet Architecture Board, which he chaired from April 1993 to July 1995, and a trustee of the Internet Society. Edward lung is copresident of Intellectual Ventures. Prior to that he was general manager of the Web platforms group in the Interactive Me- dia Group and a Microsoft chief architect, serving as a technical strategy advisor to the executive staff on advanced technology. He also led object- oriented and end-user interface technologies in the Advanced Systems division for Microsoft's future-generation operating systems products, now part of Windows NT. He also served as software architect in Appli- cations Architecture, where he codeveloped COM and OLE, and as Infor- mation at Your Fingertips (IAYF) coordinator, where he developed and deployed the IAYF technical strategy. Before joining Microsoft in 1990, Dr. Jung ran several start-up com- panies and was a biophysicist investigating protein structure-function relationships. His research has been published in Proceedings of the Na- tional Academy of Sciences, Biophysics Journal, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry. David A. Kettler is vice president for BellSouth and is in charge of the Science & Technology organization and chief architect for the BellSouth Network. His responsibilities include applied research, systems engi-

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222 APPENDIX peering, software application development, network architecture, techni- cal analysis and support, technical standards, network fundamental plan- ning, technology deployment directives, and infrastructure planning. Dr. Kettler joined BellSouth in 1987 to form the new Science & Tech- nology organization. Prior to that he was employed by AT&T Bell Labo- ratories for over 15 years and managed departments in network architec- ture, signaling, and network management. In addition, he led system architecture activities in strategic planning at AT&T corporate headquar- ters. Dr. Kettler has led and continues to lead major technology thrusts, including data networking services, residential broadband, fiber-in-the- loop, advanced intelligent networks (AINs), and emerging wireless and video technologies. Dr. Kettler has been a world leader in the introduc- tion of AIN, high-speed packet switching (ATM) for information high- ways, ADSL for high-speed data access, and optical-fiber distribution systems such as fiber-to-the-home. Presently, Dr. Kettler is leading activi- ties in the transformation of BellSouth's Network to a data-centric archi- tecture. Dr. Kettler received his B.E.E., M.S.E.E.., and Ph.D.E.E. from the Uni- versity of Virginia. Dr. Kettler is an IEEE fellow. He has served on numerous technical and scientific committees, has organized and chaired conferences and technical sessions, and has presented talks at conferences around the world. John C. Klensin is vice president for Internet Architecture at AT&T. Prior to joining AT&T in 2000, he was Distinguished Engineering Fellow at MCI and then MCI WorldCom. Outside his corporate commitments, he has had significant responsibility for the present generation of Internet applications standards. His involvement with what is now the Internet began in 1969 and 1970, when he participated in the working group that created the file transfer protocol and that made the decision to include electronic mail capability in the network's design. Dr. Klensin was on the permanent research staff at MIT for about 25 years, participating in or directing a wide variety of projects, many of them involving the applica- tion or development of computer networking or related technologies. Dr. Klensin has also been involved with international development work with a United Nations University project on food composition data, archives of images in Islamic architecture, and the Network Startup Resource Center. Milo Medin is the chief technology officer of Excite@Home, where he oversees the development of the company's high-speed backbone. Home's performance-engineered scalable network removes Internet "traffic jams" and enables true end-to-end management. In addition, the network employs replication and caching technologies that dramatically improve network efficiency.

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APPENDIX 223 Prior to joining Excite@Home, Mr. Medin served as project manager at NASA Ames Research Center. During his tenure, he directed the NASA National Research and Education Network project that, in combination with partners at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, deployed a high-speed national ATM infrastructure connecting major supercom- puting and data archiving centers. He also supervised the primary West Coast Internet interconnect network. In addition, he pioneered the global NASA Science Internet project, providing network infrastructure for sci- ence at more than 200 sites in 16 countries and 5 continents, including Antarctica, and helped establish the TCP/IP protocol as an industry stan- dard. Before NASA, Mr. Medin held various positions at Science Applica- tions Inc., programming supercomputers for defense program activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Los Alamos Na- tional Laboratory, under contract to the Defense Nuclear Agency. He has a B.S. in computer science from the University of California at Berkeley. Craig Partridge is a chief scientist at BEN Technologies (a part of Verizon Communications), where he leads a variety of Internet-related research projects. His most recent major projects involved building an experimental multigigabit router and developing a next-generation rout- ing protocol. Dr. Partridge is the chairman of the Association for Com- puting Machinery's Special Interest Group in Data Communication (one of the two major professional societies in data communications) and a part-time professor at Stanford University. He is the former editor in chief of both ACM's Computer Communication Review and IEEE Network Magazine and a consulting editor for Addison-Wesley's professional com- puting series. He is a fellow of the IEEE and holds his A.B., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. Daniel Schutzer is vice president and Director of External Standards and Advanced Technology in the Advanced Development Group at Citibank. He is responsible for interfacing with external organizations and standards bodies and for representing Citibank. This includes coordi- nating technology with business goals and priorities and keeping Citibank up-to-date with the latest technology and standards advances. Projects include electronic banking and electronic commerce, bill presentment and payment, risk management, customer behavioral modeling and math- ematical marketing, and new product design. Advanced technologies under investigation include agent technology, machine learning, multi- media, biometrics, image and voice processing, and high-performance computing. His previous positions included Technical Director for Naval Intelli- gence; Technical Director for Navy Command, Control and Communica-

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224 APPENDIX lions; and program manager at Sperry Rand. He also worked at Bell Labs, Syracuse University, and IBM. He currently teaches part time at Iona College in New Rochelle, New York, and George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He is the author of over 65 publications and 7 books: Parallel and Distributed Processing, Application of Emerging Technologies in Business, Applied Artificial Intelligence, Military Communications, Command and Control, a chapter on financial risk management in a financial man- agement handbook, and a chapter in a book on electronic commerce. Forthcoming books are on electronic payment and electronic commerce. He is a board member of the Financial Services Technology Consortium Board and chairman of ISO Subcommittee 2. He received his B.S.E.E. from the College of the City of New York and M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. from Syracuse University.