TABLE 4-1 NIH and ADHRQ Comoeting Awards by Type of Research and Degree of Investigator, Fiscal Year 1997

 

M.D.

 

M.D.-Ph.D.

Ph.D.

 

Other a

 

Total

 

Type of Research

No.

Percent

No.

Percent

No.

Percent

No.

Percent

No.

Percent

Clinical

959

36.3

102

21.3

1,449

18.0

257

29.6

2,767

23.0

Nonclinical

1,682

63.7

376

78.7

6,593

82.0

611

70.4

9,262

77.0

Total

2,641

100.0

478

100.0

8,042

100.0

868

100.0

12,029

100.0

NOTE: NIH data exclude training grants and predoctoral fellowships. AHRQ data exclude training grants, predoctoral fellowships, innovation awards, and conference grants.

a This category includes dentists and veterinarians, as well as investigators for whom no degree information was available.

SOURCES: Data are from the NIH CRISP and IMPAC systems and the AHCPR State List of Active Grants.

perhaps reflecting the fact that dentists are included in this group), followed by M.D.-Ph.D.s (21.3 percent). As a group, Ph.D.s were least likely to conduct clinical research: only 18 percent did so.

DEFINING CLINICAL RESEARCH AND THE CLINICAL RESEARCH WORKFORCE

Previous NRC analyses of clinical research have generally assumed that Ph.D.s conducting clinical research were trained in the health science disciplines listed in Appendix E , including fields such as environmental health, epidemiology, health services, nursing, and pharmacy. Yet the data on federally funded clinical research collected over the last few years reveal a workforce that is much more complex than previously recognized. According to this new information, the pool of investigators conducting clinical research supported by the NIH and AHRQ includes many who were trained in the behavioral and social sciences and, to a lesser extent, the basic biomedical sciences.

Among those whose fields of study could be identified, more Ph.D.s conducting clinical research received their degrees in clinical psychology (13.4 percent) than in any other discipline. Other fields producing large numbers of clinical investigators (listed in Table 4-2 ) included such traditional disciplines as epidemiology and nursing, as well as those less commonly associated with clinical research, including sociology, biochemistry, and physiology.

By adopting a definition of clinical research that encompasses behavioral and social science studies, the

TABLE 4-2 Ph.D.s Receiving NIH Awards for Clinical Research, by Field of Degree, 1998

Field of degree

Number

Percent

Clinical psychology

142

13.4

Experimental psychology

60

5.7

Sociology

52

4.9

Epidemiology

42

4.0

Nursing

40

3.8

Biochemistry

36

3.4

Psychology, general

36

3.4

Social psychology

35

3.3

Developmental and child psychology

31

2.9

Physiology

26

2.5

Genetics (human and animal)

23

2.2

Molecular biology

23

2.2

Speech-language pathology and audiology

23

2.2

Physiological psychology/psychobiology

21

2.0

Bioengineering and biomedical engineering

21

2.0

Anthropology

19

1.8

Other Fields

437

41.4

Total identified

1,056

100.0

Unknown fields

347

 

Total

1,403

 

SOURCES: Principal investigators were identified from the NIH CRISPand IMPAC Systems and matched against data from the Survey of EarnedDoctorates to determine the fields in which they earned their doctoraldegrees.



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