Appendix B

Biographies of Committee Members

SAMUEL H. FULLER, Co-chair, is vice president for research and development at Analog Devices Corporation. He was formerly vice president for technical strategy and chief scientist at Digital Equipment Corporation, where he led the creation of the research laboratories for Digital focused on distributed computing, high-performance computing, Internetworking, and human-computer interfaces. He also initiated work that led to Digital's Ethernet, workstations, Unix, and Internet products. Before joining Digital in 1978, Dr. Fuller was an associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, where he was involved in the performance evaluation and design of several influential experimental multiprocessor computer systems. Dr. Fuller received his B.S. from the University of Michigan in 1968 and his M.S. (1969) and Ph.D. (1972) from Stanford University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. Dr. Fuller is a member of the National Research Council's Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and was a founding member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (1986-1992). He served on the steering committee for CSTB' s Competitiveness Colloquium on Systems Integration (1989-1991) and on the committee that wrote the CSTB report Cryptography's Role in Securing the Information Society.



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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS Appendix B Biographies of Committee Members SAMUEL H. FULLER, Co-chair, is vice president for research and development at Analog Devices Corporation. He was formerly vice president for technical strategy and chief scientist at Digital Equipment Corporation, where he led the creation of the research laboratories for Digital focused on distributed computing, high-performance computing, Internetworking, and human-computer interfaces. He also initiated work that led to Digital's Ethernet, workstations, Unix, and Internet products. Before joining Digital in 1978, Dr. Fuller was an associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, where he was involved in the performance evaluation and design of several influential experimental multiprocessor computer systems. Dr. Fuller received his B.S. from the University of Michigan in 1968 and his M.S. (1969) and Ph.D. (1972) from Stanford University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery. Dr. Fuller is a member of the National Research Council's Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and was a founding member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (1986-1992). He served on the steering committee for CSTB' s Competitiveness Colloquium on Systems Integration (1989-1991) and on the committee that wrote the CSTB report Cryptography's Role in Securing the Information Society.

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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS DAVID G. MESSERSCHMITT, Co-chair, is the Roger A. Strauch Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California at Berkeley and from 1993 to 1996 was department chair. Before 1977 Dr. Messerschmitt was at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey. His current research interests include issues overlapping signal processing (especially video and graphics coding) and transport in broadband networks with wireless access, network services and protocols for multimedia, wireless multimedia computing, and the economics of networks. Dr. Messerschmitt has served as a consultant to a number of companies and is a cofounder and director of TCSI Inc. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a member of the advisory committee for the National Science Foundation's Computer and Information Science and Engineering directorate. From 1993 to 1998, Dr. Messerschmitt was a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. He won the 1999 Alexander Graham Bell medal for exceptional contributions to the advancement of communication sciences and engineering. He received a B.S. degree from the University of Colorado and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. PAUL BARAN is generally regarded as the inventor of packet switching, based on his work at RAND in the 1960s. He is a founder of several Silicon Valley companies, including Com21, Inc., a provider of broadband cable modem technology for high-speed modem and data services, where he is chairman of the board. He also serves on the advisory board of Geocast, a digital data broadcasting company. Mr. Baran received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Drexel University in 1949 and the M.S. degree in engineering from UCLA in 1959. He was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science in Engineering degree by Drexel University in 1997. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a life fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE), an International Marconi Fellow, an American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow, and a trustee of the IEEE History Center. LINDA COHEN is professor of economics and chair of the Department of Economics at the University of California at Irvine. Her research interests concern political economy, government regulation, government policy for research and development, positive political theory, and law. Dr. Cohen previously worked as a research associate at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. She was a member of the Department of Energy Program Review Committee on Airborne Nuclear Waste Management, a member of the advisory panel in support of the congressional Office of Technology Assessment's study of magnetic fusion research and

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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS development, and a member of the Panel on the Study of Human Factors Research Needs in Nuclear Regulatory Research for the National Research Council. She is currently a member of the Public Interest Energy Research Advisory Panel for the California Energy Commission. Dr. Cohen is coauthor of The Technology Pork Barrel (Brookings Institution, 1991) and is a fellow of the California Council for Science and Technology. JOHN A. COPELAND is a professor in the school of electrical and computer engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He holds the John H. Weitnauer Chair and is currently director of the Communications Systems Center. He was director of the Georgia Center for Advanced Telecommunications Technology from June 1993 to November 1996. Before joining Georgia Tech in March 1993, Dr. Copeland was vice president of technology at Hayes Microcomputer Products (1985-1993), vice president of engineering technology at Sangamo Weston, Inc. (1982-1985), and a researcher at Bell Labs (1965-1982). He began his career at Bell Labs conducting research on semiconductor microwave and millimeter-wave devices. Later, he supervised a group that developed magnetic bubble computer memories. In 1974, he led a team that designed CMOS integrated circuits, including Bell Labs' first microprocessor, the BELLMAC-8. His last contributions at Bell Labs were in the area of lightwave communications and optical logic. At Sangamo Weston he was responsible for R&Dgroups at 10 divisions. At Hayes he was responsible for the development of modems with data compression and error control and for Hayes' representation on CCITT and ANSI standards committees. Dr. Copeland received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been awarded 37 patents and has published over 50 technical articles. In 1970 he was awarded IEEE's Morris N. Liebmann Award for his work on gallium arsenide microwave devices. He is a fellow of the IEEE and has served as editor of the IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices. He also served on the Board of Trustees for the Georgia Tech Research Corporation (1983-1993). ALBERT M. ERISMAN is director of Mathematics and Computing Technology for the Phantom Works within the Boeing Company. He leads a staff of 250 computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and engineers who provide leadership for Boeing in all areas of information technology and mathematics. Dr. Erisman has been with Boeing since 1969. His work has been in mathematical algorithms, mathematical software, and the application of these technical areas to the improvement of Boeing engineering and analysis codes. More recently he addressed the broader area of the application of advanced information technology to the transformation of business processes. Management focus has included the

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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS linking of research and development with business requirements, the delivery of technology for business benefit, and the management of an innovative environment. Dr. Erisman has published two books and more than 20 technical papers. In December 1989, he was named one of 11 inaugural technical fellows of the Boeing Company. The technical fellowship was established to recognize professional excellence among engineers and scientists who have made significant technical contributions to Boeing. He was a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Supercomputing, a member of a National Science Foundation panel to assess the state of mathematics education and research, and has held various offices in the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Dr. Erisman earned a B.A. in mathematics from Northern Illinois University in 1962 and both his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics from Iowa State University in 1967 and 1969, respectively. DANIEL T. LING is vice president of Microsoft Research, Redmond. He joined Microsoft Research in March 1992 as a senior researcher in the area of user interfaces and computer graphics. He has been particularly interested in the design of agent-based user interfaces, user interface architectures, intelligent and adaptive interfaces, and virtual worlds. He was later named director of research. Before to joining Microsoft, Dr. Ling was a senior manager at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center. He initially worked on special-purpose VLSI chips for displays and was a coinventor of the video-RAM dynamic memory. He subsequently managed departments that conducted research on advanced microsystems based on 370 and RISC architectures and the associated systems and VLSI design tools. One of these departments initiated work on a novel machine architecture, organization, and design known as America, which led to the IBM RS/6000 workstations. He subsequently managed the Veridical User Environments department that engaged in research into innovative user interfaces including multimodal interfaces, virtual worlds technology, and 3D visualization. Dr. Ling also served on the staff of the director of development in the General Technology Division overseeing the development of CMOS chip technologies and on special assignment to the vice president of systems research. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He was also a Fannie and John Hertz Foundation fellow. Dr. Ling holds seven patents and is the author of a variety of publications in solid state physics, systems, user interfaces, and holography. He was awarded an IBM Outstanding Innovation Award in 1986 for his coinvention of the video-RAM. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Physical Society, and the Association for Computing Machin-

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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS ery. He also serves on advisory committees for the University of Washington and the University of California at Berkeley. ROBERT L. MARTIN is the chief technology officer for Lucent Technologies. His expertise has been at Bell Laboratories and Bellcore, where he held a variety of positions related to systems development. He has been responsible for Unix, network management systems, intelligent network systems, packet switching, and broadband access systems developments. Dr. Martin received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Brown University in 1964 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1965 and 1967, respectively. In 1985, he attended the MIT Alfred P. Sloan School Senior Executive Program. A fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., Dr. Martin was a member and the first chair of the IEEE's Software Industrial Advisory Board. He has served on the National Research Council's Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and is now a member of the Federal Communication Commission's Technological Advisory Board. JOEL MOSES is institute professor, professor of engineering systems, and professor of computer science and engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He was previously head of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, dean of engineering, and provost of MIT. He led the development of the MACSYMA system, a forerunner of the major formula manipulation systems available today. He is a co-originator of the concept of knowledge-based systems. His current interests include the organization of large complex systems. Dr. Moses is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a former member of the academic advisory committee for SEMATECH, a former member of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy 's committee on High Performance Computing and Communications, a member of NAE's Committee on Engineering Education, a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Workforce Needs in Information Technology, and a former member of its Manufacturing Studies Board and its Board on Telecommunications and Computer Applications. He is a member of the advisory boards of the engineering schools at Columbia University and the University of Michigan. He received a B.A. (1962) and an M.A. (1963) from Columbia University and a Ph.D. (mathematics, 1967) from MIT.

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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS NORINE E. NOONAN is assistant administrator for research and development at the Environmental Protection Agency. She was formerly vice president for research and dean of the graduate school at Florida Institute of Technology and, before that, branch chief for science and space at the Office of Management and Budget. Dr. Noonan also held faculty appointments at the University of Florida and Georgetown University. From 1982 to 1983, she served as an American Chemical Society Congressional Science Fellow. Her areas of expertise are in research management, federal budgetary processes, and science and technology policy. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the American Society for Cell Biology. She has served on several other National Research Council committees, notably the Committee on Antarctic Policy and Science, the Task Force on Alternative Organizations for the Future of Space Science, and the Committee on Building an Environmental Management Science Program. Dr. Noonan received her B.A. in zoology summa cum laude from the University of Vermont and her M.A. and Ph.D. in cell biology from Princeton University. DAVID A. PATTERSON holds the E.H. and M.E. Pardee Chair of Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley and has taught computer architecture since joining the university's faculty in 1977. At Berkeley, he led the design and implementation of RISC I, probably the first VLSI Reduced Instruction Set Computer. This research became the foundation of the SPARC architecture currently used by Fujitsu and Sun Microsystems. As part of the celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the microprocessor in 1996, Microprocessor Report and COMDEX named SPARC one of the most significant microprocessors. Professor Patterson was also a leader of the Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks project, which led to high-performance storage systems from many companies. He was also involved in the Network of Workstations project, which led to cluster technology used by Internet companies such as Inktomi. These projects led to three distinguished dissertation awards from the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). His current research interests are in building novel microprocessors using intelligent DRAM (IRAM) for use in portable multimedia devices and in creating intelligent storage (ISTORE) to provide computers for Internet services that are highly available and easily maintained and that can be gracefully evolved. Dr. Patterson was a chair of the computer science division in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of California at Berkeley, the ACM Special Interest Group in Computer Architecture, and the Computing Research Association. He has consulted for many companies, including Digital Equipment Corporation, Hewlett Packard, Intel, and

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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS Sun Microsystems, and is also the coauthor of five books. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Computer Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and a fellow of the ACM. He is also a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. His teaching has been honored by the ACM with the Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award, by IEEE with the Undergraduate Teaching Award and the James H. Mulligan, Jr., Education Medal, and by the University of California with the Distinguished Teaching Award and the Diane S. McEntyre Award for Excellence in Teaching. He received the inaugural Outstanding Alumnus Award of the UCLA Computer Science Department as part of its twenty-fifth anniversary and has received the IEEE Technical Achievement Award, the IEEE Reynold B. Johnson Information Storage Award, and the IEEE John von Neumann Medal. STEWART PERSONICK is the E. Warren Colehower Chair Professor of Telecommunications at Drexel University and director of the Center for Telecommunications and Information Networking, also at Drexel. Until 1998, he was vice president of information networking at Bellcore. He began his career at Bell Laboratories in 1967 and spent 18 years as an individual researcher and an R&Dmanager focusing on fiber-optics technology and applications. Between 1985 and 1998, he managed organizations focusing on emerging telecommunications technology, systems, services, and applications and was heavily involved in industry and government activities related to the emerging national information infrastructure. Dr. Personick received his B.S. from City College of New York and his Sc.D. degree from MIT. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., a fellow of the Optical Society of America, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He was a member and former chair of the U.S. Federal Networking Council Advisory Committee, is a frequent lecturer on the national information infrastructure and related telecommunications subjects, and is the author of several books and numerous articles on telecommunications technology and applications. ROBERT SPROULL is vice president and fellow at Sun Microsystems Laboratories and leads its Application Technologies Center. Since his undergraduate days, he has been building hardware and software for computer graphics, such as clipping hardware, an early device-independent graphics package, page description languages, laser printing software, and window systems. He has also been involved in VLSI design, especially of asynchronous circuits and systems. Before joining Sun, he was a principal with Sutherland, Sproull & Associates, an associate professor at

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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS Carnegie Mellon University, and a member of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. He is a coauthor with William Newman of the early textbook Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics and author of the book Logical Effort, which deals with designing fast CMOS circuits. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. MARK WEISER (deceased) was the chief technologist at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). He joined Xerox PARC as a member of the technical staff in 1987 and later headed the Computer Science Laboratory. From 1979 to 1987, Dr. Weiser was assistant and associate professor and associate chair in the Computer Science Department at the University of Maryland. He started three companies, and his 75 plus technical publications are in such areas as the psychology of programming, program slicing, operating systems, programming environments, garbage collection, and technological ethics. Dr. Weiser's work since 1988 focused on ubiquitous computing, a program he initiated that envisions personal computers being replaced with invisible computers embedded in everyday objects. He believed that this would lead to an era of calm technology in which technology, rather than causing users to panic, would help them focus on what is really important. Weiser was also the drummer with the rock band Severe Tire Damage, the first live band on the Internet. Dr. Weiser had no bachelor's degree; his Ph.D. was in Computer and Communications Sciences from the University of Michigan (1979). PATRICK WINDHAM is a consultant on science and technology policy issues. He operates his own firm, Windham Consulting, and also serves as a senior associate with R. Wayne Sayer and Associates, a government relations company. In addition, he is a lecturer in the public policy program at Stanford University. From 1984 until 1997, Mr. Windham served as a senior professional staff member for the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the U.S. Senate. He helped senators oversee and draft legislation for several large civilian science and technology agencies and focused on issues of science, technology, and U.S. industrial competitiveness. From 1976 to 1978 he worked as a congressional fellow with the Senate Commerce Committee, and from 1982 to 1984 he served as a legislative aide in the personal office of Sen. Ernest Hollings. Mr. Windham received an A.B. from Stanford University and a Master's of Public Policy from the University of California at Berkeley. IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER is vice president of technology and strategy for the IBM enterprise systems group. He was formerly general

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MAKING IT BETTER: EXPANDING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH TO MEET SOCIETY'S NEEDS manager of the Internet Division at IBM, where he was responsible for IBM's Internet and e-business strategy and for coordinating its implementation across the company. He joined IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 1970, where he focused on organizing technology transfer programs to move the innovations of computer science from IBM's research labs into its product divisions. After joining IBM 's product development organization in 1985, Dr. Wladawsky-Berger continued his efforts to bring advanced technologies to the marketplace, leading IBM's initiatives in supercomputing and parallel computing, including the transformation of its large systems through the incorporation of parallel computing architectures. He has managed a number of IBM 's businesses, including the UNIX-based RS/6000 Division. Dr. Wladawsky-Berger is co-chair of the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. He was a founding member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council and a member of the NRC's Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. Dr. Wladawsky-Berger received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Chicago.