APPENDIX C

Study Committee Biographies

Alan G. Merten, Chair, became president of George Mason University on July 1, 1996. George Mason University, located in northern Virginia and within the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, is a doctorate-granting institution with an enrollment of over 24,000 students. Dr. Merten was previously the dean and professor of information systems at the Johnson Graduate School of Management of Cornell University. He was dean of the College of Business Administration at the University of Florida and associate dean for executive education and computing services at the University of Michigan. Dr. Merten has an undergraduate degree in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin, a master's degree in computer science from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. degree in computer science from Wisconsin. He has held academic appointments in both engineering and business, and academic and business positions in Hungary and France. Dr. Merten is a member of the board of directors of the Center for Innovative Technology. He serves on the board of directors of the Greater Washington Board of Trade, INOVA Health System, three information technology companies, and a mutual trust fund. Dr. Merten was a member of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Commission on Higher Education and served as program chairman of the 1998 World Congress on Information Technology, held at George Mason University.

Burt Barnow, Vice Chair, is associate director for research and principal research scientist at the Institute for Policy Studies of Johns Hopkins University. Much of his work focuses on the operation of labor markets and



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Building a Workforce for the Information Economy APPENDIX C Study Committee Biographies Alan G. Merten, Chair, became president of George Mason University on July 1, 1996. George Mason University, located in northern Virginia and within the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, is a doctorate-granting institution with an enrollment of over 24,000 students. Dr. Merten was previously the dean and professor of information systems at the Johnson Graduate School of Management of Cornell University. He was dean of the College of Business Administration at the University of Florida and associate dean for executive education and computing services at the University of Michigan. Dr. Merten has an undergraduate degree in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin, a master's degree in computer science from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. degree in computer science from Wisconsin. He has held academic appointments in both engineering and business, and academic and business positions in Hungary and France. Dr. Merten is a member of the board of directors of the Center for Innovative Technology. He serves on the board of directors of the Greater Washington Board of Trade, INOVA Health System, three information technology companies, and a mutual trust fund. Dr. Merten was a member of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Commission on Higher Education and served as program chairman of the 1998 World Congress on Information Technology, held at George Mason University. Burt Barnow, Vice Chair, is associate director for research and principal research scientist at the Institute for Policy Studies of Johns Hopkins University. Much of his work focuses on the operation of labor markets and

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Building a Workforce for the Information Economy evaluating social programs. He teaches the evaluation course in the Institute's graduate public policy program and a course in labor economics for the Department of Economics. His current research includes an evaluation of the welfare-to-work program, a project to help states design programs to enhance job retention and advancement for welfare recipients, and an evaluation of New Hampshire's welfare reforms. Dr. Barnow received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and a B.S. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before coming to Johns Hopkins, he was vice president of a consulting firm in Washington, D.C. He served 9 years in the Department of Labor, most recently as director of the Office of Research and Evaluation for the Employment and Training Administration. Eileen Appelbaum is the research director at the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., where she has been employed since 1991. Formerly she was professor of economics at Temple University and spent several summers as a guest research fellow in the Labor Markets and Employment section of the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin (WZB). In 1995 Dr. Appelbaum was elected to the Executive Board of the Industrial Relations Research Association and in 1996 was appointed to a 4-year term on the Advisory Council of the WZB. She has acted as consultant to the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) of the U.S. Congress on several volumes, including Programmable Automation Technologies in Manufacturing (1985) and Trade in Services (1988), and is coeditor of Labor Market Adjustments to Structural Change and Technological Progress (1990). More recently she served on an OTA panel that reviewed modernization plans of the Social Security Administration. She has studied and written about employee participation and is coauthor of Job Saving Strategies: Worker Buyouts and QWL (1988); The New American Workplace (1994); and Manufacturing Advantage: Why High Performance Work Systems Pay Off (2000), on high-performance work systems in the United States. She has published numerous articles on employment and labor market issues and on developments in the service sector of the economy. She has also published extensively on the labor market experiences of women, including the effects of technology on women's jobs and the reasons for the expansion of part-time and contingent work arrangements in the United States. She is the author of Back to Work: Determinants of Women's Successful Reentry (1981). Her current research focuses on organizations and employment. Current projects include studies of high-performance work systems and an international comparison of working time arrangements in companies in the industrialized economies. Recent articles on these topics have appeared in Industrial Relations, British Journal of Industrial Relations, Inter-

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Building a Workforce for the Information Economy national Labour Review, and Labour and Society. Dr. Appelbaum received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1973. Sarah Kuhn is an associate professor in the Department of Regional Economic and Social Development at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. Her research area is the use and design of information technology, using social science methods to study work processes, and the impact of computer technology in the workplace. These interests have led her also to study the processes by which information technology is designed and technical specialists are educated. She received her Ph.D. in 1987 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Department of Urban Studies and Planning, and she has worked with labor unions on technology-related concerns and with community groups on community development issues. Dr. Kuhn will be a fellow at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard during the 2000-2001 academic year. Joel Moses is an institute professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well as professor of computer science and engineering and professor of engineering systems. He was previously provost at MIT, dean of engineering, and head of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department. He received a B.A. (1962) and an M.A. (1963) from Columbia University and a Ph.D. (mathematics, 1967) from MIT. He led the development of the MACSYMA system for formula manipulation. Other areas of interest include organization of large complex systems, software production, knowledge-based systems, and symbolic manipulation. Dr. Moses is a fellow of the IEEE and AAAS, as well as a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member of NAE's Committee on Engineering Education and a member of the advisory boards of Columbia University, Hebrew University, and the University of Michigan's Engineering School. He is also a member of the board of Analog Devices Inc. Patricia Murray is vice president and director of human resources for Intel Corporation. She is responsible for ensuring that on a global basis the corporation hires, develops, and retains the best and the brightest employees in the industry. She is also responsible for providing world-class technology-based support and service to Intel's more than 70,000 employees around the world. Ms. Murray first joined Intel in 1990, as an attorney on the company's Human Resources legal staff. She was promoted to manager of the Human Resources legal staff in 1992, a position she held until her promotion to vice president and director of Human Resources in 1996. She has been a corporate vice president since 1997. Prior to joining Intel, Ms. Murray was an attorney at the law firm of

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Building a Workforce for the Information Economy Morrison and Foerster in Palo Alto, California, where she specialized in employment litigation and counseling. Prior to her legal career, she was also in the medical profession as an ICU nurse and nursing administrator at the University of Michigan Hospitals. Ms. Murray has a B.A from Michigan State University, a B.S. from Saint Louis University, and a J.D. from the University of Michigan (1986). James L. Outtz has been an industrial and organizational psychologist in private practice for more than 20 years. His area of specialization is employment selection. Dr. Outtz received his doctorate in industrial/organizational psychology from the University of Maryland in 1976. He is a fellow in the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. An active member of professional organizations, he served for 3 years as a member of the National Research Council's Board on Testing and Assessment and for 2 years on the Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessment of the American Psychological Association. He has published works on a variety of topics, including implementing fair selection strategies, the effect of testing media on validity and subgroup performance, and the use of test score banding as a referral method. Dr. Outtz is a nationally recognized expert in the area of employment selection. The focus of his work reflects a strong interest in the factors that influence the effect of employment tests and other selection devices on racial and ethnic minorities. Roy Radner has been a Stern School professor of business at New York University since 1996. He teaches microeconomics, including the economics of information and organization. His research interests include decentralization of information, decisions, and incentives in large firms; bounded rationality and the managerial theory of the firm; demand and supply in higher education; and strategic analysis of global warming. A few of his selected publications are “Hierarchy: The Economics of Managing,” Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. 30, 1992; Economic Theory of Teams (with J. Marschak), Yale University Press, 1972; Demand and Supply in U.S. Higher Education (with L.S. Miller), Carnegie Commission on Higher Education and McGraw-Hill, New York, 1975; and “Economic Survival,” in D.P. Jacobs et al., Frontiers of Research in Economic Theory, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1998, pp. 183-209. Dr. Radner has a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the University of Chicago (1956) and an M.S. and a B.S. in mathematics (1951 and 1950, respectively). He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Cecilia E. Rouse is associate professor of economics and public affairs and research associate of the Industrial Relations Section at Princeton University. She is also a faculty research associate in the National Bureau

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Building a Workforce for the Information Economy of Economic Research Labor Studies Program, as well as a member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Panel for the Doctorate Data and of the National Charter School Advisory Committee. Dr. Rouse currently has a Mellon Foundation Grant to study the roles of community colleges in postsecondary education. She also currently has grants from foundations such as Annie E. Casey, Smith Richardson, and Spencer to evaluate Florida's new school voucher program. She has published research on the effects of workplace education on earnings, turnover, and job performance; the underrepresentation of women in economics; labor market returns to postsecondary education; the achievement effects of the Milwaukee Parental Choice program; and the existence of discrimination in symphony orchestras. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. Ira Rubinstein is associate general counsel at Microsoft. Previously, he was an associate at MacDonald, Hoague, and Bayless in Seattle. Mr. Rubinstein received his J.D. in 1985 from Yale Law School. He received his M.A. in 1978 in philosophy from SUNY at Stony Brook and his B.A. in 1974 from Clark University, in Worcester, Massachusetts. Mr. Rubinstein is an expert on legal dimensions of electronic commerce and employment issues in the software industry. He was a member of both the U.S. delegation to the Ad Hoc Group of Experts on Cryptography Policy in Paris and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, International Migration Policy Program, Study Group on Labor Certification, and he currently serves on the President's Export Council, Subcommittee on Encryption, and on the Board of Trustees of the American Immigration Law Foundation. Peter Saflund is the associate director of the Northwest Center for Emerging Technologies, whose mission is to advance information technology (IT) education by advancing the quality, quantity, and diversity of the IT workforce. Mr. Saflund was a key player in a recent Center effort to develop skill standards, curriculum, online and traditional courseware, and development models for IT education. He has been a tenured full-time professor of electronics engineering, an associate dean of science technology programs, and technology officer for Puget Sound community and technical colleges. He also has over 20 years of experience in industry, holding engineering and management positions in several major high-technology companies, including Harris Corporation and General Electric, and has owned his own business specializing in voice and data. Mr. Saflund has completed doctoral coursework in community college leadership at Oregon State University. He holds a master's degree in education with a concentration in curriculum and development and holds undergraduate degrees in engineering and education.

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Building a Workforce for the Information Economy Jan Schultz is an experienced executive, software entrepreneur, and software designer. He has had extensive experience in all aspects of software analysis, design, and development, as well as extensive business planning and execution experience. He has started two software businesses and one computer consulting business and has done pioneering medical informatics work in the University of Vermont's Department of Medicine. He is the director of reuse and the team leader of the Reuse Group at IDX Corporation. Mr. Schultz's background includes, most recently, being senior vice president for engineering, president, and founder of StepSoft Inc. Prior to forming StepSoft, he was the director of information services and a member of the executive staff at the University of Vermont Health Center, where he managed operations, application support, the help desk, and production. Mr. Schultz was principal and owner of JRS Computer Consultants in Burlington. He provided product design and implementation in the medical and financial service software industries. He was also principal systems engineer and a founder of Second Foundation Inc., a spin-off from PROMIS Laboratory. While at Second Foundation, he designed and implemented an object-oriented database management system tailored to manage electronic medical records. He also designed and implemented a 4GL with a C-like syntax to operate in the UNIX environment to replace PPL, and he converted 400,000 lines of PPL code to the new language. Mr. Schultz was director of systems development for PROMIS Laboratory and a research associate in the Department of Medicine as well as an assistant professor of computer science in the Engineering, Mathematics and Business Administration College of the University of Vermont. He planned, coordinated, and implemented the evolution of the PROMIS system through four generations of hardware and software. The PROMIS system was a highly interactive, touch-screen system that allowed users to manipulate an electronic medical record within the context of a large body of medical knowledge. He has a B.S. in mathematics and physics and an M.S. in mathematics from the University of Illinois. He developed a very early computer-based teaching machine called Socrates while a graduate student. Eric Tomlinson is chief executive officer and cofounder of TheScientificWorld, an e-science Internet company providing high-value information products and business services to the scientific, technical, and medical communities. Previously he was the chief executive officer and president of GeneMedicine, Inc., a publicly traded gene therapy company. He is a visiting professor at the School of Pharmacy of London University and has held several academic appointments. He has B.Pharm., Ph.D., and D.Sc. degrees from London University and an honorary D.Sc. from Liverpool's John Moores University.

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Building a Workforce for the Information Economy Ernst Volgenau is the president and CEO of SRA International Inc., a company that he founded in 1978. SRA provides computer, communications, and management consulting services and software to business and government organizations. Since its founding, SRA has sustained rapid growth and now totals about 1,800 people. Dr. Volgenau has 30 years of experience analyzing, designing, and developing large technological systems of all types. He received a Ph.D. in engineering in 1966 from the University of California at Los Angeles. Dr. Volgenau also holds a master's degree in electrical engineering and is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. Helen M. Wood is the director of the Office of Satellite Data Processing and Distribution, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). She directs the real-time collection, processing, analysis, and dissemination of data gathered from environmental satellites operated by NOAA and other agencies. This operation aids the protection of lives and property through improved weather and climate forecasting and provides support for U.S. search-and-rescue operations. Ms. Wood is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and has held numerous positions in computer science and engineering societies, including president of the IEEE Computer Society. She was elected IEEE Engineering Manager of the Year and received the Richard E. Merwin Award for distinguished service to the computing profession. She was awarded the Meritorious Service Award of the American National Standards Institute, the U.S. Department of Commerce Gold Medal, and the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award. She holds a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Maryland and an M.S. in computer science from the American University.