Appendix A—
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

H.M. (Hub) Hubbard (chair) is retired president and chief executive officer of the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR). Previously, he was the Spark M. Matsunaga Distinguished Fellow in Energy and Environment at the University of Hawaii, chair of the National Research Council (NRC) Energy Engineering Board, and chair of the NRC Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. He has also been director of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and executive vice president of SERI's parent company, Midwest Research Institute. Dr. Hubbard had an adjunct appointment at the East-West Center and is a former member of the boards of directors of PICHTR, the American Solar Energy Society, the Consortium for Pacific Education, and the Guaranty State Bank and Trust Company (Beloit, Kansas). He has also been a consultant to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, the Congressional Research Service, and the Secretary of Energy's Advisory Board. Dr. Hubbard' s expertise is in management of renewable energy research and development (R&D), technology assessment, and energy policy. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry, with a minor in chemical engineering, from the University of Kansas.

R. Brent Alderfer has just opened a utility consulting practice specializing in distributed and green power markets and regulatory strategies. Most recently, he was a commissioner on the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC) and chair of the Energy Resources and the Environment Committee of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). In that role, he championed the initiation of several distributed-power-related projects and sponsored the NARUC resolutions supporting open markets for distributed-power



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Renewable Power Pathways: A Review of the U.S. Department of Energy's Renewable Energy Programs Appendix A— Biographical Sketches of Committee Members H.M. (Hub) Hubbard (chair) is retired president and chief executive officer of the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR). Previously, he was the Spark M. Matsunaga Distinguished Fellow in Energy and Environment at the University of Hawaii, chair of the National Research Council (NRC) Energy Engineering Board, and chair of the NRC Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. He has also been director of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and executive vice president of SERI's parent company, Midwest Research Institute. Dr. Hubbard had an adjunct appointment at the East-West Center and is a former member of the boards of directors of PICHTR, the American Solar Energy Society, the Consortium for Pacific Education, and the Guaranty State Bank and Trust Company (Beloit, Kansas). He has also been a consultant to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, the Congressional Research Service, and the Secretary of Energy's Advisory Board. Dr. Hubbard' s expertise is in management of renewable energy research and development (R&D), technology assessment, and energy policy. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry, with a minor in chemical engineering, from the University of Kansas. R. Brent Alderfer has just opened a utility consulting practice specializing in distributed and green power markets and regulatory strategies. Most recently, he was a commissioner on the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC) and chair of the Energy Resources and the Environment Committee of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). In that role, he championed the initiation of several distributed-power-related projects and sponsored the NARUC resolutions supporting open markets for distributed-power

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Renewable Power Pathways: A Review of the U.S. Department of Energy's Renewable Energy Programs technologies. Commissioner Alderfer also chaired the Market Power Resolution Drafting Committee for NARUC and has been a leading spokesman for competitive markets and regulatory innovation in the electricity industry. Before his appointment to the Colorado PUC, Commissioner Alderfer was in private law practice handling commercial and natural resource matters. He is also an electrical engineer and has served as a commissioner on the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission, as an arbitrator and mediator, and as a panel member of the American Arbitration Association. He graduated from Georgetown University Law Center in 1977 and has a B.S. in electrical engineering, with honors, from Northeastern University. Dan E. Arvizu is group vice president for energy and environment and systems, CH2M HILL. He has been director of the Materials and Process Sciences Center; director of the Advanced Energy Technology and Policy Center; director of the Technology Transfer Center; manager of the Technology Transfer and Industrial Relations Department; supervisor of the Photovoltaic Cell Research Division; supervisor of the Photovoltaic Concentrator Systems Division; and a member of the technical staff for solar programs at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). He has also been a member of the technical staff for customer switching systems at Bell Laboratories. He has extensive experience in materials science applications for nuclear weapons and energy systems and the development of renewable energy systems, including solar thermal systems, photovoltaic systems, and concentrating solar collectors. Dr. Arvizu was awarded the 1996 Hispanic Engineers' National Achievement Award for Executive Excellence, and he is a member of several advisory groups, including the Commercialization Advisory Board for the Solar II Central Receiver Pilot Plant. He received his B.S. from New Mexico State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University, all in mechanical engineering. Everett H. Beckner is the deputy chief executive, Atomic Weapons Establishment, and the former vice president, Technical Operations and Environmental Safety and Health, Lockheed Martin Corporation Energy and Environment Sector. His previous positions include principal deputy assistant secretary, Defense Programs, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); science advisor to Admiral James Watkins, Secretary of Energy; vice president for energy programs, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); director of energy programs, SNL; and director of Waste Management Programs, SNL. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a former member of the NRC Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. Dr. Beckner has broad experience in a variety of solar energy, fossil energy, advanced nuclear fission, fusion, and waste management technologies, as well as in the management of large R&D programs. He also has experience in defense and defense technology issues, technology transfer programs, and nuclear safety. He has a Ph.D. in physics from Rice University.

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Renewable Power Pathways: A Review of the U.S. Department of Energy's Renewable Energy Programs Peter D. Blair is executive director of Sigma Xi, a scientific research society. He has held a number of positions related to energy technology, energy policy, and energy economics. At the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), he was assistant director and director of the Division of Industry, Commerce and International Security. Formerly, he was program manager of energy and materials. In these positions, he was responsible for OTA's research on energy and materials, transportation, infrastructure, international security and space, industry, and commerce. Dr. Blair was a cofounder and principal of Technecon Consulting Group, Inc., specializing in investment decisions related to, and management of, independent power projects, as well as contract research in the area of energy and environmental systems. His primary areas of interest are energy management, systems engineering, and energy policy analysis. He has a Ph.D. in energy management and policy from the University of Pennsylvania. Charles H. Goodman is vice president, Research and Environmental Affairs, Southern Company. In this capacity, he is responsible for the customer technologies, power technologies, economic analysis, environmental assessment, and the clean air compliance departments, as well as the Power Systems Development Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. He has chaired the Environmental Staff Committee of the Business Roundtable and is a member of the Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Act Advisory Committee a member of the Research Advisory Committee of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and chairman of the EPRI Environment and Health Business Unit. Dr. Goodman is also involved in a number of activities related to the electric power industry that address the ability of technologies to meet existing and emerging regulatory constraints. He is a spokesman on research, environmental and coal utilization issues for the Southern Company. He has a B.S. from the University of Texas at Arlington and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Tulane University in mechanical engineering. Nathanael Greene, an energy policy analyst with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), is actively involved in implementation and coordination to spur the development and adoption of fuel cells and solar photovoltaics in the northeastern United States and has worked with the utility industry in a number of states to implement demand-side management programs, He also worked with the Metropolitan Transit Authority in New York to develop models of air quality and the impact of alternative-fueled vehicles and has held positions and been a consultant with the Pace Energy Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Energy Foundation, and Brown University. He has a B.A. in public policy from Brown University and an M.S. in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley. Jeffrey M. Peterson, program manager, Energy Resources Group, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, oversees a diverse research

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Renewable Power Pathways: A Review of the U.S. Department of Energy's Renewable Energy Programs program for renewable (photovoltaics, wind, and biofuels) and fossil energy resource development that includes cooperative initiatives to introduce new energy and environmental technologies into the marketplace. He is also currently working with the Center for Clean Air Policy on a World Bank project to determine the potential role of biomass to meet economic and environmental needs in Hungary. He is a member of the Technical Advisory Board, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Center for Forestry Research and Development and the Steering Committee, U.S. Department of Energy Northeast Regional Biomass Program. He was a member of the Technical Advisory Board, Cornell University Center for Advanced Biotechnology, and the External Review Panel, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Terrestrial Biomass Project. He has extensive experience in biomass energy and the development of other renewable energy technologies. He received a B.S. and M.S. in wood science and technology from the University of Massachusetts, and an M.S. in industrial administration from Union College. T.W. Fraser Russell (NAE), the Allan P. Colburn Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware, has also been chairman and professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, acting dean and associate dean in the College of Engineering, and director of the Institute of Energy Conversion, all at the University of Delaware. He has also been a design engineer for Union Carbide Canada; a research engineer for the Research Council of Alberta; a chemist at the British American Oil Company; and a consultant to a number of industries, including E.I. Du Pont de Nemours. He has been extensively involved in the engineering development of semiconductor materials for photovoltaic modules, including manufacture and commercial-scale designs. Dr. Russell has received a number of awards, including the Francis Alison Award, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Award in Chemical Engineering Practice, the AIChE Wilmington Section Thomas H. Chilton Award, and the American Chemical Society Leo Friend Award. He has a B.S. and M.S. from the University of Alberta and a Ph.D. from the University of Delaware in chemical engineering. Richard E. Schuler, who currently directs the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs, holds a joint faculty appointment as professor of economics in the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of civil and environmental engineering in the College of Engineering. While on leave from Cornell, Dr. Schuler served as commissioner and deputy chairman of the New York State Public Service Commission from 1981 to 1983, where he was instrumental in implementing structural changes in the regulation of utilities. Prior to that, Dr. Schuler was director of the New York State Public Service Commission's Office of Research. Before returning to graduate school, he was senior fuels and energy economist with Battelle Memorial Institute for two years, and from 1959 to 1968 he was an engineer and manager with the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company. He currently serves on the

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Renewable Power Pathways: A Review of the U.S. Department of Energy's Renewable Energy Programs board of directors of the New York State Independent System Operator. Dr. Schuler received his Ph.D. and M.A. in economics from Brown University. He also earned an M.B.A. from Lehigh University and a B.E. in electrical engineering from Yale University. Jefferson W. Tester is director of the Energy Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and H.P. Meissner Professor of Chemical Engineering. He has also held the position of director, MIT School of Chemical Engineering Practice, and was a staff member and group leader for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project, Los Alamos National Laboratory. He has been involved in various areas of research on energy production and environmental control technologies and on energy conversion and extraction technologies and has written or co-authored more than 125 papers and eight books. Dr. Tester is involved in a number of research collaborations, including the Alliance for Global Sustain-ability project on energy options for a greenhouse gas constrained world. In his capacity as director of the MIT Energy Laboratory, he is responsible for oversight of a wide variety of energy-related technology developments and policy-related studies. He has served on numerous advisory committees, including the Energy R&D Panel of the 1997 President' s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, the NRC Committee on Energy Conservation in the Processing of Industrial Materials, and the NRC Committee on Geothermal Energy Technology. He has a B.S. and M.S. from Cornell University and a Ph.D. from MIT, all in chemical engineering.