F

Biographical Information

Daniel J. Fink, Chair

President

D.J. Fink Associates, Inc.

Potomac, MD

Mr. Fink received his B.S. and M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was deputy director of defense research and engineering for strategic and space systems and assistant director for defensive systems at the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) from 1963 to 1967. Mr. Fink joined General Electric in 1967 as vice president and general manager of the Space Division (1967-1977), vice president and group executive of the Aerospace Group (1977-1979), and finally as senior vice president of corporate planning and development (1979-1982). He formed his own consulting firm in 1982. Mr. Fink's honors include DOD's Distinguished Public Service Medal (1967), election to the National Academy of Engineering (1974), the National Aeronautics Association's Collier Trophy (1976), NASA's Distinguished Public Service Medal (1986), NASA's Medal for Outstanding Leadership (1988), and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics von Karman Lecturer (1980).

Robert S. Cooper

President

Atlantic Aerospace Electronic Corporation

Greenbelt, MD

Dr. Cooper received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and then joined the MIT staff as assistant professor of electrical engineering and staff member of the Research Laboratory for Electronics (1963-1968) and staff member, group leader, and division director at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory (1968-1972). He was assistant director of defense research engineering at the U.S. Department of Defense from 1972 to 1975. From 1975 to 1979, Dr. Cooper was director of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He was vice president for engineering at Satellite Business Systems from 1979 to 1981. Dr. Cooper was director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency from 1981 to 1985 and assistant secretary of defense for research and technology from 1984 to 1985. Dr. Cooper is currently the president of Atlantic Aerospace Electronics Corporation.

Anthony W. England

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Associate Dean, Rackham School of Graduate Studies

University of Michigan

Ann Arbor, MI



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 51
Assessment of Technology Development in NASA's Office of Space Science F Biographical Information Daniel J. Fink, Chair President D.J. Fink Associates, Inc. Potomac, MD Mr. Fink received his B.S. and M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was deputy director of defense research and engineering for strategic and space systems and assistant director for defensive systems at the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) from 1963 to 1967. Mr. Fink joined General Electric in 1967 as vice president and general manager of the Space Division (1967-1977), vice president and group executive of the Aerospace Group (1977-1979), and finally as senior vice president of corporate planning and development (1979-1982). He formed his own consulting firm in 1982. Mr. Fink's honors include DOD's Distinguished Public Service Medal (1967), election to the National Academy of Engineering (1974), the National Aeronautics Association's Collier Trophy (1976), NASA's Distinguished Public Service Medal (1986), NASA's Medal for Outstanding Leadership (1988), and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics von Karman Lecturer (1980). Robert S. Cooper President Atlantic Aerospace Electronic Corporation Greenbelt, MD Dr. Cooper received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and then joined the MIT staff as assistant professor of electrical engineering and staff member of the Research Laboratory for Electronics (1963-1968) and staff member, group leader, and division director at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory (1968-1972). He was assistant director of defense research engineering at the U.S. Department of Defense from 1972 to 1975. From 1975 to 1979, Dr. Cooper was director of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He was vice president for engineering at Satellite Business Systems from 1979 to 1981. Dr. Cooper was director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency from 1981 to 1985 and assistant secretary of defense for research and technology from 1984 to 1985. Dr. Cooper is currently the president of Atlantic Aerospace Electronics Corporation. Anthony W. England Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Associate Dean, Rackham School of Graduate Studies University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI

OCR for page 51
Assessment of Technology Development in NASA's Office of Space Science Dr. England received his Ph.D. in geophysics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served as scientist-astronaut for NASA 's Manned Spacecraft Center from 1967 to 1972 and again as a senior scientist-astronaut from 1979 to 1988. He was mission scientist for Apollo 13 and 16, and he flew as a mission specialist on space shuttle Challenger's Spacelab 2 in 1985. He served as program scientist for the space station during 1986 and 1987. Between 1972 and 1979, he was a research geophysicist and the deputy chief of the Office of Geochemistry and Geophysics with the U.S. Geological Survey. Dr. England has been at the University of Michigan since 1988, where he is professor of electrical engineering and computer science; professor of atmospheric, oceanic, and space science; and associate dean of the H.H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. He has received several honors from NASA: the Outstanding Science Achievement Medal (1973), the Space Flight Medal (1985), and the Exceptional Achievement Medal (1988). Dr. England has also received the U.S. Antarctic Medal (1979) and the Flight Achievement Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Donald C. Fraser Director, Center for Photonics Research Boston University Boston, MA Dr. Fraser received his B.S. and M.S. in aeronautics and astronautics and his Sc.D. in instrumentation from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Fraser joined MIT's Instrumentation Laboratory (which became the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory in 1973) as a member of the technical staff (1962-1969), advanced to director of the Control and Flight Dynamics Division (1969-1981) and vice president of technical operations (1981-1988), and became executive vice president of the Laboratory in 1988. From 1990 to 1991, Dr. Fraser was deputy director of Operational Test and Evaluation for Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence at the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD). He was the appointed principal deputy under secretary of defense (acquisition) from 1991 to 1993. Since 1993, Dr. Fraser has been the director of Boston University's Center for Photonics Research and a professor of engineering and physics. Dr. Fraser's honors include DOD's Defense Distinguished Service Medal and election to the National Academy of Engineering (1990). Aram M. Mika Vice President Business Development, Advanced Programs and Technology Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Sunnyvale, CA Mr. Mika received his M.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. His responsibilities as vice president of business development for advanced programs and technology at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space encompass strategy formulation, business acquisition, and advanced programs for the Missiles and Space business portfolio, including remote sensing, telecommunications, defensive systems, and strategic missile programs. These responsibilities

OCR for page 51
Assessment of Technology Development in NASA's Office of Space Science also include technology development for all of these product lines at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center. Prior to his career at Lockheed Martin, he was vice president of Hughes Aircraft Company and president of its Space Electro-Optics Business Unit, where he directed the design, development, and production of spaceborne electro-optical sensors and associated signal/data processing systems for civil space and U.S. Department of Defense applications. Mr. Mika served as vice president of Hughes's Santa Barbara Research Center and manager of its Systems Division (now Santa Barbara Remote Sensing), where he led the development of civil-space instruments for NASA, NOAA, and international customers. Irwin I. Shapiro Director Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Cambridge, MA Dr. Shapiro received his Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. His current research interests include precollege science education and applications of radio and radar techniques to astrophysics, geophysics, and tests of theories of gravitation. Dr. Shapiro was a staff member at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) Lincoln Laboratory (1954-1970) and a professor of geophysics and physics at MIT (1967-1985). He has been the director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics since 1983, as well as a University professor at Harvard (1997-present) and a senior scientist of the Smithsonian Institution (1982-present). Dr. Shapiro has won various awards and prizes from professional societies in the United States and abroad. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Oswald Siegmund Associate Director Space Sciences Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA Dr. Siegmund is an adjunct professor at the University of California at Berkeley's Astronomy Department. He is also an associate director of Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory and the experimental astrophysics group leader. Dr. Siegmund has participated in the development and application of a number of rocket, shuttle, and satellite instruments, and technology programs, including instruments for the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission, the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) ultraviolet imager, and others. His instrumentation systems experience encompasses scintillators, phosphors, proportional counters, image intensifiers, photocathodes, microchannel plates, electronic readout systems, charge and time encoding electronics, and supporting analysis tools. His honors include the H.S.W. Massey Research

OCR for page 51
Assessment of Technology Development in NASA's Office of Space Science Prize, University College London (1979-1980) and NASA group and individual awards (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, and 1998). Dr. Siegmund received his Ph.D. in physics and astronomy from University College London.