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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS RICHARD C. ALKIRE is Alumni Professor and Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign' where he has been on the faculty since 1969. He received the Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests are in mass transfer, fluid flow, and potential distribution phenomena in electrochemical processing operations, including plasma processing. He was president of The Electrochemical Society during 1985-1986, and is currently a member of the National Materials Advisory Board. ALLEN J. BARD holds the Norman Hackerman/Welch Chair in Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin, is editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Chemical Society, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He attended the City College of New York (B.S., summa cum laude, 1955) and completed his graduate work (A.M., 1956; Ph.D., 1958) at Harvard University. In 1958 he joined the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests have included investigations in electro-organic chemistry, photoelectrochemistry, electrogenerated chemiluminescence, and electroanalytical chemistry, and he has published about 400 papers and several books arid holds six patents in these areas. ELTON I. CAIRNS is Associate Director of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He received B.S. degrees in chemistry and chemical engineering from Michigan Technological University and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He has conducted electrochemical research in industrial laboratories and national laboratories. His current research emphasizes batteries and fuel cells. He has published over 120 papers and patents and is active in a number of professional societies. He is vice president of both the International Society of Electrochemistry and the Electrochemical Society. DANIEL D. CUBICCIOTTI is a scientific specialist in the Nuclear Power Division of the Electric Power Research Institute. He obtained a B.S. (1942) and a Ph.D. (1946) in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. For 40 years he has pursued a career of research 145

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146 in the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions of materials at elevated temperatures, most recently in the fields of chemical behavior of fission products in nuclear power systems. LARRY R. FAULKNER is Professor and Head of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his B.S. degree from Southern Methodist University in 1966 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin in 1969. He has served since that time as a member of the chemistry faculty at Harvard University, at the University of Texas at Austin, and at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has been a member of the Materials Research Laboratory of the University of Illinois since 1978. He served as U.S. Regional Editor of the Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry from 1980 to 1985. His research activities focus on electron, energy, and mass transfer processes in systems of controlled chemical architecture. ADAM HELLER heads the Electronic Materials Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories. He holds a Ph.D. from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. He authored 102 papers and holds 30 patents in semiconductor electro- chemistry, lithium batteries, liquid lasers, and electronic materials. His current research interests include transparent metals, inter- connection of microelectronic components, materials for microelectronic devices and their processing, and hydrogen-evolving solar cells. NOEL JARRETT received his M.S. degree from the University of Michigan. At present he holds the position of Technical Director, Chemical Engineering R&D, Alcoa Laboratories, Aluminum Company of America, and is active in a number of professional societies. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the American Society of Metals, and holds 15 patents in the extraction and purification of metals. RONALD LATANISION is Director of the School of Engineering's Materials Processing Center and of the H. H. Uhlig Corrosion Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his B.S. in metallurgy from Pennsylvania State University in 1964 and Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1968. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he served as a Science Advisor to the Committee on Science and Technology of the U.S. House of Representatives during a sabbatical in 1982-1983. He is author of 100 papers and books in the field of corrosion science and engineering. DIGBY D. MACDONALD is currently Director, Chemistry Laboratory, SRI International, in Menlo Park, California. Prior to joining SRI in 1984, he served as Professor of Metallurgical Engineering and Director of the Fontana Corrosion Center at Ohio State University. He is the author or

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147 coauthor of more than 160 research papers in electrochemistry, corrosion science, thermodynamics, and reaction kinetics as well as of a book on transient techniques in electrochemistry. WILLIAM H. SMYRL is Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Sciences and Associate Director of the Center for Corrosion Research at the University of Minnesota. He received his Ph.D. (chemistry) at the University of California, Berkeley, and spent 3 years at the Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories and 11 years at Sandia National Laboratories. He joined the faculty of the University of Minnesota in 1984. His research interests are modeling of corrosion processes, in situ techniques for metal-metal oxide interface studies, digital impedance for faradaic analysis, stress corrosion cracking, polymer- metal interfaces, and electrochemical processes. CHARLES W. TOBIAS is Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1947. He has been a Faculty Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory since 1954. He received his Diploma in Chemical Engineering and his Ph.D. at the University of Technical Sciences in Budapest, Hungary. His main research interests are in transport phenomena in electrolysis and galvanic cells, electrolytic gas evolution, and nonaqueous ionizing solvents. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a past president of The Electrochemical Society and the International Society of Electrochemistry. ERNEST B. YEAGER is Hovorka Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Chemical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University and is Director of the Case Center for Electrochemical Sciences. His research interests are in the field of physical electrochemistry and particularly electro- catalysis, electrode kinetics, and electrolytes. He is a past president of The Electrochemical Society and of the International Society of Electrochemistry.