C

Biographies of Committee Members

Albert J. Baciocco, Jr., Chair, retired from the U.S. Navy as Vice Admiral in 1987 after 34 years of distinguished service, principally in the nuclear submarine force and directing the Department of the Navy research and technology development enterprise. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1953, receiving a B.S. in engineering, and subsequently pursued graduate level studies in nuclear engineering as part of his training for the U.S. Navy nuclear propulsion program. In 1998, Admiral Baciocco received an honorary doctorate in engineering from Florida Atlantic University. Upon retirement from the Navy, Admiral Baciocco formed The Baciocco Group, Inc., a technical and management consulting practice, and has since been engaged in a variety of business and pro bono activities with industry, government, and academe, most of them related to technology planning, investment, management, and implementation. Admiral Baciocco is a director of the American Superconductor Corporation. He serves on several boards and committees of government, industry, and academe. He is a member of the Naval Studies Board and of the Board of Trustees of the South Carolina Research Authority, a state-chartered, not-for-profit advanced technology and management enterprise. In addition, he is a director of its affiliated Advanced Technology Institute. Admiral Baciocco serves on the boards of directors of the University of South Carolina Research Institute, the Foundation for Research Development at the Medical University of South Carolina, and the Institute for Ocean and Systems Engineering at Florida Atlantic University. He currently serves as chair of the Southeastern Universities Research Association's Maritime Technical Advisory Committee to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. In addition, he is a member emeritus and past chairman of the Advisory Board to the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, and he is currently a member of the Naval Studies Board.

Arthur B. Baggeroer is Ford Professor of Engineering and Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Chair for Ocean Science in the Departments of Ocean and Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and the Acoustical Society of America. He has been the director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)-Woods Hole Joint Program in Oceanography and ceanographic Engineering. During sabbatical leaves he was a consultant



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An Assessment of Undersea Weapons Science and Technology C Biographies of Committee Members Albert J. Baciocco, Jr., Chair, retired from the U.S. Navy as Vice Admiral in 1987 after 34 years of distinguished service, principally in the nuclear submarine force and directing the Department of the Navy research and technology development enterprise. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1953, receiving a B.S. in engineering, and subsequently pursued graduate level studies in nuclear engineering as part of his training for the U.S. Navy nuclear propulsion program. In 1998, Admiral Baciocco received an honorary doctorate in engineering from Florida Atlantic University. Upon retirement from the Navy, Admiral Baciocco formed The Baciocco Group, Inc., a technical and management consulting practice, and has since been engaged in a variety of business and pro bono activities with industry, government, and academe, most of them related to technology planning, investment, management, and implementation. Admiral Baciocco is a director of the American Superconductor Corporation. He serves on several boards and committees of government, industry, and academe. He is a member of the Naval Studies Board and of the Board of Trustees of the South Carolina Research Authority, a state-chartered, not-for-profit advanced technology and management enterprise. In addition, he is a director of its affiliated Advanced Technology Institute. Admiral Baciocco serves on the boards of directors of the University of South Carolina Research Institute, the Foundation for Research Development at the Medical University of South Carolina, and the Institute for Ocean and Systems Engineering at Florida Atlantic University. He currently serves as chair of the Southeastern Universities Research Association's Maritime Technical Advisory Committee to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. In addition, he is a member emeritus and past chairman of the Advisory Board to the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, and he is currently a member of the Naval Studies Board. Arthur B. Baggeroer is Ford Professor of Engineering and Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Chair for Ocean Science in the Departments of Ocean and Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and the Acoustical Society of America. He has been the director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)-Woods Hole Joint Program in Oceanography and ceanographic Engineering. During sabbatical leaves he was a consultant

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An Assessment of Undersea Weapons Science and Technology to the Chief of Naval Research at the Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic (SACLANT) Center in La Spezia, Italy, and a Green Scholar at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Baggeroer's research is primarily related to advanced signal processing methods applied to sonar, ocean acoustics, and geophysics. Alan Berman, an independent consultant, currently consults for the Center for Naval Analyses, where he assists with analyses of Navy research and development (R&D) investment programs, space operation capabilities, and information operations. He also consults for the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University, where he provides general management support and program appraisal. Dr. Berman's background is in defense research and technology, particularly in regard to advanced weapon and combat systems. He is regarded as a leading expert on combat systems. He was at one time dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami and at another, director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Berman has served on numerous government advisory and scientific boards. He is currently a member of the Naval Studies Board. He is also a member of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) oversight board that advises the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory of the Department of Energy on its FEL program. Gerald A. Cann, an independent consultant, currently consults for the Raytheon Company. He recently retired as senior advisor to the Raytheon Executive Office. Mr. Cann's background is in system development from the viewpoints of both industry and government. Mr. Cann is a former vice president of the General Dynamics Company, where he created a new business unit that formed alliances with both internal divisions of the company and major outside participants in undersea warfare. He has held several government positions, including Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition (responsible for acquisition policy, procedure, and execution of all research, development, production, shipbuilding, and logistics programs); Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Engineering, and Systems; and Director of Naval Warfare in the Department of Defense for Research and Engineering. He completed his term as a member of the Naval Studies Board in 1999. A. Douglas Carmichael is professor (emeritus) of power engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His background is in naval propulsion systems. He joined the Department of Ocean Engineering at MIT in 1970, where submarine propulsion was his primary research interest. Prior to joining MIT, Dr. Carmichael was research fellow at the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London, England. He is the author of a very large number of publications on naval propulsion, including the design impacts of alternative technologies. He is a fellow of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. Thomas A. Clare is a senior consultant to Techmatics, Inc., an Anteon Company. He has more than 30 years of diversified management and senior executive experience in the research and development of large, complex systems, software development, science and technology management, human resources management, and R&D laboratory management. As the former executive director of the Navy's largest R&D laboratory, Dr. Clare made major contributions to the research and development of undersea weapons systems, surface combatants, aircraft carriers, Navy and Marine Corps systems, including Aegis, the submarine-launched ballistic missile Tomahawk, and theater ballistic missile defense weapon and combat systems. He has also been a key advisor and leader in the Navy and the Department of Defense scientific and technology community, particularly in systems engineering and weapon system concepts. He has served on numerous government advisory and scientific boards, addressing the need for systems engineering and management policies and practices across the services in an era of reduced

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An Assessment of Undersea Weapons Science and Technology budgets. He is a member of the American Society of Naval Engineers, the Surface Navy Association, and Mary Washington College President 's Roundtable. Dennis F. Colin is vice president and general manager of Navigation and Gravity Systems at Lockheed Martin Systems. His expertise is in the integration of complex electronics systems on submarines, integrated undersea surveillance systems, and surface, and air platforms. At Lockheed Martin, Mr. Colin has responsibility for all fleet support, training systems, equipment design and procurement, and program management for Trident Navigation and Gravity Systems. Prior to this assignment, he had overall responsibility for Lockheed Martin's Navy submarine programs, as well as for interfacing with Lockheed Martin facilities dealing with the coordination of U.S. Navy nonpropulsion requirements on submarines. Mr. Colin is a member of many professional organizations, including the Navy League. Alec D. Gallimore is associate professor of aerospace engineering and director of the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory at the University of Michigan. His background is in electric propulsion. An experimental plasma physicist, his current research interests include electric propulsion engine diagnostic tools for plume characterization. Dr. Gallimore is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Astronautics and Aeronautics and a member of the American Society for Engineering Education. He recently served on the Defense Science Board's Task Force on Force Modernization. Ernest L. Holmboe currently works for the Applied Physics Laboratory/Johns Hopkins University (APL/JHU) as a part-time special assistant. His background is in systems engineering, particularly in connection with submarine technology. Until June 1998, Dr. Holmboe served as the head of the Submarine Technology Department (STD). The STD concentrates on submarine security and undersea surveillance and is also applying its technical knowledge to such projects as special operations and technologies to reduce manpower on ships and submarines. Before joining APL/JHU, Dr. Holmboe was head of AT&T Bell Laboratories' Navy Systems Engineering Department. He is a member of the U.S. Naval Institute, the Naval Submarine League, and the National Defense Industrial Association. Alfred I. Kaufman is a research staff member for the System Evaluation Division at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). His background is in undersea warfare, particularly acoustic detection. A physicist by training, Dr. Kaufman's research interests include the analyses of sonar and acoustic processing systems, as well as wave propagation in turbulent mediums. He was also a leading expert on national security issues relating to the Soviet threat to NATO sea lines of communication. Before joining IDA, Dr. Kaufman was an analyst at the Center for Naval Analyses and head of the Physics Department at Manhattanville College. He is a member of the American Physical Society. David W. McCall is a retired director of the Chemical Research Laboratory at AT&T Bell Laboratories (now Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies). A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has a background in materials science and chemistry. As director of the Chemical Research Laboratory at AT&T Bell Laboratories, he was responsible for research, development, and engineering of materials and processes employed in t;e production of communications systems. The materials included a variety of insulating materials and advanced structural materials that were essential to the long-term integrity of the equipment produced. During his career at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Dr. McCall served in a number of capacities, including head of the Physical Chemistry Department. There he led programs expanding the bandwidth of coaxial submarine cable systems and programs to advance the understanding of atmospheric chemistry as it relates to detection and tracking of intercontinental ballistic missiles. Dr. McCall has served on numerous government advisory committees and was appointed by the President as chair of the National Commission on Superconductivity. In 1999 he completed three terms as a member of the Naval Studies Board.

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An Assessment of Undersea Weapons Science and Technology L. David Montague, an independent consultant, is retired president of the Missile Systems Division at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has a background in military weapon systems, particularly the guidance and control of submarine-launched weapons. In addition to his expertise in both tactical and strategic strike systems, his experience has focused on the requirements, development, and policy issues of defense systems to protect against weapons of mass destruction. Mr. Montague is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards, including task forces for both the U.S. Army Science Board and the Defense Science Board. He is a former member of the Steering Task Group of the Navy's Directorate for Strategic Systems Programs. Douglas R. Mook is director of Advanced Systems at Sanders. His background is in acoustic processing and sensor fusion. Trained in both electrical and ocean engineering, Dr. Mook is responsible for several key Department of Defense programs, including the U.S. Navy's Advanced Acoustics Communications Advanced Technology Demonstration, the U.S. Army' s Federated Laboratories digital battlefield programs for communications and sensors, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's unattended ground sensors programs. He is a member of the Navy's fleet ballistic missile submarine security review committee and has been a member of the Army Research Laboratory Restructuring Committee and the Army Digital Battlefield Definition Committee. Richard F. Pittenger, retired from the Navy as a Rear Admiral and is currently associate director for marine operations at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Admiral Pittenger's background is in antisubmarine warfare and oceanography. During his naval career, he was oceanographer of the Navy and also director of the Antisubmarine Warfare Program. At WHOI, Admiral Pittenger oversees the operations of three large research ships, the WHOI research submarine, and remotely operated vehicles. Daniel Savitsky is professor emeritus of ocean engineering and retired director of the Davidson Laboratory at the Stevens Institute of Technology. His background is in naval architecture, particularly in hydromechanics. Throughout his career, Dr. Savitsky has been a leader in research focused on hydrodynamics, as well as other ocean engineering concerns associated with naval architecture design. He is a fellow and honorary member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and a member of the American Society of Naval Engineers.