APPENDIX B

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS

John Armstrong is a retired Vice President of Science and Technology at International Business Machines. He has held several positions for IBM, including manager of materials and technology development at the IBM East Fishkill laboratory, and Director of Research. In 1989 he was elected a member of the Corporate Management Board and named Vice President of Science and Technology. Dr. Armstrong's research focused on nuclear resonance, nonlinear optics, the photon statistics of lasers, picosecond pulse measurements, the multiphoton spectroscopy of atoms, the management of research in industry, and issues of science and technology policy. He received an A.B. (summa cum laude) in Physics from Harvard College in 1956 and a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1961.

Burt S. Barnow is Principal Research Scientist at the Institute for Policy Studies at the Johns Hopkins University where he teaches courses in program evaluation and labor economics. Dr. Barnow has 25 years of experience as an economist in the fields of employment and training, labor economics, and program evaluation. Dr. Barnow joined the Institute for Policy Studies in 1992 after working for eight years at the Lewin Group (formerly ICF Incorporated, Lewin/ICF, and Lewin-VHI) and nearly nine years of



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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS John Armstrong is a retired Vice President of Science and Technology at International Business Machines. He has held several positions for IBM, including manager of materials and technology development at the IBM East Fishkill laboratory, and Director of Research. In 1989 he was elected a member of the Corporate Management Board and named Vice President of Science and Technology. Dr. Armstrong's research focused on nuclear resonance, nonlinear optics, the photon statistics of lasers, picosecond pulse measurements, the multiphoton spectroscopy of atoms, the management of research in industry, and issues of science and technology policy. He received an A.B. (summa cum laude) in Physics from Harvard College in 1956 and a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1961. Burt S. Barnow is Principal Research Scientist at the Institute for Policy Studies at the Johns Hopkins University where he teaches courses in program evaluation and labor economics. Dr. Barnow has 25 years of experience as an economist in the fields of employment and training, labor economics, and program evaluation. Dr. Barnow joined the Institute for Policy Studies in 1992 after working for eight years at the Lewin Group (formerly ICF Incorporated, Lewin/ICF, and Lewin-VHI) and nearly nine years of

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology experience in the U.S. Department of Labor. Prior to working in the Department of Labor, Dr. Barnow taught economics at the University of Pittsburgh. He has a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Geoff Davis is a researcher with the Signal Processing Group at Microsoft Research. Previously he was an assistant professor of mathematics at Dartmouth College. His research interests include: image compression using wavelet-based methods, adaptive signal and image representations, joint source/channel coding, and fast medical imaging acquisition. Dr. Davis has a continuing interest in labor market issues for science and engineering Ph.D.s. He is the creator of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation sponsored website (www. phds.org) that serves as a repository of information on science career issues. He was the co-organizer of a recent CPST workshop on graduate outcomes in the sciences and engineering. He received his Ph.D. in applied mathematics form the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University in 1994. Robert Dauffenbach is a professor of business administration and economics and Director, Center for Economic and Management Research, College of Business Administration, University of Oklahoma. He served on the faculties of Wayne State University and the University of Illinois prior to coming to Oklahoma. Dr. Dauffenbach's research focuses on human resource economics and quantitative methods. He has served on various study panels for the National Academy of Sciences that investigated science and engineering personnel research and data needs. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in 1973. Ronald G. Ehrenberg is Vice President for Academic Programs, Planning, and Budgeting at Cornell University. In addition he serves as a Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research interests are concentrated in analyses

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology of labor markets and the educational sector. Dr. Ehrenberg received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1970. Michael G. Finn is a senior economist at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, a U.S. Department of Energy facility operated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities. He worked at the Center for Human Resource Research at The Ohio State University before moving to Oak Ridge in 1976. From 1988 through 1990, Dr. Finn took leave to serve as director of studies and surveys at the National Research Council 's Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel. In all three of these jobs he has been involved in government-sponsored studies that attempt to assess future supply/ demand balance of scientists and engineers. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1972. Alexander H. Flax is a consultant and is affiliated with The Washington Advisory Group. Previously he worked as an aerodynamics and structural engineer in aircraft and helicopter firms, including The Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory where he served as Vice President and Technical Director. He served as Chief Scientist of the Air Force, was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Research and Development, and took on the additional position of Director of the National Reconnaissance Office. After leaving his government positions, Dr. Flax was President of the Institute for Defense Analyses. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was its Home Secretary from 1984 to 1992. He received a B.A. in aeronautical engineering from New York University in 1940 and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Buffalo in 1957. Daniel S. Greenberg has specialized in coverage of science and health policy in the United States and other countries for many years. His currently a Visiting Scholar in the Johns Hopkins University Department of History of Science, Medicine and Technology,

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology where he is writing a book on contemporary science politics. The book project is supported by a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He also writes a syndicated newspaper column on science policy and related matters for the Washington Post and other newspapers, and he is a correspondent for The Lancet. In addition, he is editor-at-large of Science & Government Report, a newsletter he founded in 1971. He formerly was a reporter on the Washington Post, a Congressional Fellow of the American Political Science Association, founding editor of the News and Comment Section of Science journal of the AAAS, and Washington correspondent of the New England Journal of Medicine. Charles A. Goldman is an economist at RAND, specializing in the economics of education and international technology transfer. He is currently leading an effort to assist the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in improving the research partnership between the federal government and higher education. This work builds on a multi-year examination of strategy and competition in U.S. higher education, with Dominic Brewer and Susan Gates. He has also completed (with William Massy) a major study of the production of science and engineering Ph.D.s in the United States. His international research examines the impact of technology and economics on U.S.-Asia relations. Prior to joining RAND, Dr. Goldman worked at the Stanford Institute for Higher Education Research and Graduate School of Business. He received his Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and also holds a B.S. in computer science and engineering from MIT. Daniel S. Hamermesh is the Edward Everett Hale Professor of Economics at the University of Texas, Austin and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Previously he has held faculty positions at Princeton and Michigan State Universities, and has held visiting professorships at numerous universities in the United States, Europe, Australia, and Asia. He authored Labor

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology Demand, The Economics of Work and Play, and a wide variety of articles in labor economics and the leading general and specialized economics journals. Dr. Hamermesh's research concentrates on labor demand, social insurance programs (particularly unemployment insurance), and unusual applications of labor economics (e.g., suicide, sleep, and beauty). He received a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1969. P. Brett Hammond is Director of Strategic Planning at the Teachers Insurance Annuity Association-College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF). Prior to joining TIAA-CREF, he was Director of Academy Studies at the National Academy of Public Administration. Dr. Hammond served as Acting Executive Director and Associate Executive Director of the Commission of Behavioral and Social Sciences of the National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the faculty of the University of California, both Berkeley and Los Angeles. Dr. Hammond's research and writings focus on pension economics, higher education economics, science and technology, finance, and policy analysis. He received his Ph.D. in public policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980. Caroline M. Hoxby is an Associate Professor of Economics at Harvard University, where she has been on the faculty since 1994. In addition, she is a research fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Dr. Hoxby's teaching and research are concerned with the economics of education, the labor market, and local governments. Her current research interests include a study of how market forces shape American colleges and universities. In other recent work, she has studied the growth of teachers' unionization in U.S. schools. Dr. Hoxby received her Ph.D. from MIT and also has a graduate degree in economics from Oxford, where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar.

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology George Johnson has served on the faculty of the University of Michigan since 1966. Previously he worked with the Department of Labor and was President of the Council of Economic Advisors. He is a specialist in labor market economics. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1966. Nancy Kirkendall is a mathematical statistician in the Statistical Policy Office, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and Vice President of the American Statistical Association. Previously, she worked at the Energy Information Administration, which provides forecasts of energy supply and demand as part of its mission. At OMB she is desk officer for the Census Bureau and the chair of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology. She is also an adjunct professor at the George Washington University, where she teaches forecasting in the Operations Research Department. She received her Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the George Washington University in 1973. Charles F. Manski is a Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His current research focuses on identification of problems in the social sciences. Dr. Manski received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973. Daniel L. McFadden is Director of the Department of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. His university experience includes E. Morris Cox Chair and Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, Fairchild Distinguished Scholar at California Institute of Technology, and Director of the Statistics Center and Economics Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. McFadden 's memberships include the Economic Advisory Panel of the National Science Foundation, the Executive Committee of TRB, the President of the Economet-

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology ric Society, the Executive Committee and Vice President of the American Economic Association. He was the recipient of the John Bates Clark Medal from the AEA and the Frish Medal, and is a National Academy of Sciences member. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1962. Ronald L. Oaxaca is a Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics and a Senior Associate in the Economic Research Laboratory of the University of Arizona. His research focuses on laboratory experiments with job search models and on the accuracy and usefulness of supply estimates of scientists and engineers. Dr. Oaxaca received a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University in 1971. Cornelius J. Pings is president of the Association of American Universities (AAU). Previously he held faculty positions at Stanford University and California Institute of Technology and was Provost at the University of Southern California. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has chaired the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). Dr. Pings also served as a member of the National Commission on Research, was President of the Association of Graduate Schools, and a member of the Boards of Directors of the Council on Government Relations and Council of Graduate Schools. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 1955. Sherwin Rosen is the Edward L. and Betty B. Bergman Distinguished Service Professor of Economics and editor of the Journal of Political Economy at the University of Chicago, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institute, and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Dr. Rosen was a member of the economics department at the University of Rochester from 1964 to 1976 before moving to Chicago. He is known for his research contributions in

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology the microeconomic fields of labor economics, industrial organization, and agricultural economics on problems of product differentiation and pricing, income distribution, agricultural commodity cycles, human capital, and the economics of organizations. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1966. Neal H. Rosenthal is Associate Commissioner for Employment Projections and, since 1962, has worked for the Bureau of Labor Statistics on programs concerned with developing current and projected occupational employment. He is the author of numerous articles and reports dealing with current and projected supply and demand in a variety of occupational fields. He currently directs the Bureau's work on developing national labor force, industry employment, and occupational employment projections and career guidance information, including the Occupational Outlook Handbook and Occupational Outlook Quarterly. Jack H. Schuster is professor of education and public policy at the Claremont Graduate School. Previously he served as Assistant Director of Admissions at Tulane University, Assistant to the Chancellor at the University of California, Berkeley, and as a lecturer in political science. He has held the positions of Visiting Scholar at the University of Michigan's Center for the Study of Higher Education, Guest Scholar in the Governmental Studies Program at the Brookings Institution, and Visiting Fellow and Research Associate at the University of Oxford. Dr. Schuster's research activities are centered on the academic labor market and accreditation activities. He received a J.D. degree from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Paula E. Stephan is Associate Dean of the School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. Her research is centered on the distribution of rewards to scientific research, an examination of

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology scientists as entrepreneurs, and variations in labor supply. Dr. Stephan received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan in 1971. William A. (Skip) Stiles, Jr. is the Democratic Legislative Director for the House Committee on Science, a position he has held since 1991. Mr. Stiles' current job responsibilities include working with the democratic congressional leadership and the committee's democratic members to coordinate the legislative agenda. His specific responsibilities have included: lead committee staffer for the Energy Policy Act of 1992, work on defense conversion technology programs, environmental technology legislation, and alternative transportation technologies. Prior to his current position, Mr. Stiles was staff director for the Department Operations, Research, and Foreign Agriculture Subcommittee on the House Agriculture Committee, a position he held since 1985. Mr. Stiles is a 1971 graduate of the College of William and Mary. Sarah Turner is an assistant professor of education and economics at the University of Virginia. Previously she worked for the Mellon Foundation. Her recent research focuses on the impact of changes in financial aid programs on institutional tuition and aid policies, gender differences in the choice of major and occupational outcomes, the assessment of changes in the return to college quality over time, and the relationship between schools of education and the labor market for teachers. She received her B.A. from Princeton and did her doctoral study in economics at the University of Michigan. George E. Walker is Vice President of Research and Dean of the Graduate School at Indiana University, Bloomington. Previously he was a research associate in physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, a research associate at Stanford University, and a member of the physics faculty at Indiana University, Bloomington.

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FORECASTING DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF DOCTORAL SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS: Report of a Workshop on Methodology He serves as a visiting staff member at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Dr. Walker's research activities are focused on nuclear theory, electron scattering, meson-nucleus interactions, nucleon-nucleus interactions, and heavy ion scattering. He received his Ph.D. in physics from Case Western Reserve University in 1966. Eric Weinstein is currently conducting postdoctoral research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previously he served as a Lady Davis Fellow at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. In his current research he is collaborating with Pia Malaney of the Harvard Institute for International Development on a program which uses geometry and mathematical models to solve problems in intertemporal economics (e.g., changing preferences and index number problems). Dr. Weinstein is continuing his analysis of scientific and engineering supply and demand theory, and is beginning collaboration with Richard Freeman on a framework for analyzing the scientific labor market. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University.