Appendix C
Program Participants

JEAN-CHRISTOPHE BUREAU is an economist and research director with the French Institute for Agricultural Research in Thiverval-Grignon, France. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from University Paris-Sorbonne. His research focus is on agricultural productivity and consumer concerns with trade.

JULIE CASWELL is a professor at the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Massachusetts. Her research areas include food quality and safety, strategic decision making, industrial organization, risk assessment and benefit/cost analysis. Her research focuses on understanding the operation of domestic and international food systems, with particular interest in the economics of food quality, especially the quality attributes of safety and nutrition, and international trade. Caswell received her Ph.D. in agricultural economics and economics from the University of Wisconsin.

WALTHER ENKERLIN HOEFLICH is currently working as a Technical Officer for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria. He worked for the Mexican Dirección General de Sanidad Vegetal, Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería y Desarrollo Rural (DGSV/SAGAR), in Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) based area-wide fruit fly control programs for 11 years. He has been a consultant for the FAO/IAEA joint division in SIT feasibility



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Incorporating Science, Economics, and Sociology in Developing Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards in International Trade: Proceedings of a Conference Appendix C Program Participants JEAN-CHRISTOPHE BUREAU is an economist and research director with the French Institute for Agricultural Research in Thiverval-Grignon, France. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from University Paris-Sorbonne. His research focus is on agricultural productivity and consumer concerns with trade. JULIE CASWELL is a professor at the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Massachusetts. Her research areas include food quality and safety, strategic decision making, industrial organization, risk assessment and benefit/cost analysis. Her research focuses on understanding the operation of domestic and international food systems, with particular interest in the economics of food quality, especially the quality attributes of safety and nutrition, and international trade. Caswell received her Ph.D. in agricultural economics and economics from the University of Wisconsin. WALTHER ENKERLIN HOEFLICH is currently working as a Technical Officer for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria. He worked for the Mexican Dirección General de Sanidad Vegetal, Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería y Desarrollo Rural (DGSV/SAGAR), in Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) based area-wide fruit fly control programs for 11 years. He has been a consultant for the FAO/IAEA joint division in SIT feasibility

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Incorporating Science, Economics, and Sociology in Developing Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards in International Trade: Proceedings of a Conference assessments, technology transfer and program implementation. Hoeflich holds a Ph.D. degree in applied entomology from the University of London. KAREN GOODELL is a Ph.D. student and teaching assistant in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The recipient of numerous grants, fellowships, and awards, Goodell's primary research focus is on the effects of introduced honeybees on native solitary bees. SHEILA JASANOFF is professor of science and public policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and School of Public Health at Harvard University. A lawyer by training, her research career has been devoted to the interaction of law, science, and politics in democratic societies and she has pioneered the integration of perspectives from the social studies of science with legal and policy analysis. She holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University and a J.D. degree from Harvard Law School. TIMOTHY JOSLING is an agricultural economist and professor in the Food Research Institute at Stanford University. Josling's research interests center on industrial country agricultural policies, international trade in agricultural products, and the process of economic integration. He is currently involved in studies of the reform of the agricultural trading system and agriculture trade policies in the World Trade Organization, North American Free Trade Agreement, and MERCOSUR, countries of the Caribbean Basin, and the European Union (EU). Josling received a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Michigan State University. RAYMOND A. JUSSAUME, JR., is a rural sociologist and currently holds a joint appointment in research, extension, and teaching at the Department of Rural Sociology at Washington State University. Jussaume's primary emphases include international agricultural marketing and trade; community and development studies; and he specializes in cross-cultural issues of markets, consumer preferences, and values for multiple crops and animal products. Jussaume received his Ph.D. in development sociology from Cornell University. He also has an M.A. in political science (with a certificate in global policy studies) from the University of Georgia. PETER KAREIVA is an ecologist in the Department of Zoology at the University of Washington. Kareiva's research is focused on spatial heterogeneity influences on species interactions and building of ecological models that can be scaled up to address multispecies interactions and environmental issues. He also is examining ecological theory of biocontrol, population biology of herbivorous insects, impacts of nonindigenous organisms, and cross-fertilization between transgenic crops and wild relatives. Kareiva received his Ph.D. in ecology and evolution from Cornell University.

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Incorporating Science, Economics, and Sociology in Developing Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards in International Trade: Proceedings of a Conference JAMES H. McDONALD is assistant professor of anthropology, University of Texas at San Antonio. His areas of specialization include economic and political/legal anthropology, political economy and agricultural development in Mexico, Latin America, and the United States. He holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from Arizona State University. BENT NIELSEN is head of Section for Zoonotic Diseases, Veterinary and Food Safety Service at the Federation of Danish Pig Producers and Slaughterhouses in Copenhagen, Denmark. His research efforts have focused on food safety issues related to microbial contamination of meat and he has been instrumental in developing serological testing strategies for controlling Salmonella in swine herds and Salmonella contamination of pork. He holds a D.V.M. from The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in Denmark and a Ph.D. in veterinary microbiology and immunology from The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Denmark. D. WARNER NORTH is president and principal scientist of NorthWorks, Inc., a consulting firm in Belmont, California, and a consulting professor in the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems and Operations Research at Stanford University. He has participated in more than a dozen National Research Council studies on environmental risk, most recently Understanding Risk: Informing Decisions in a Democratic Society (1996). He has carried out a variety of applications of decision analysis and risk analysis, from quarantine policy for the exploration of Mars to management of toxic substances and nuclear waste. North received his Ph.D. in operations research from Stanford. DONNA ROBERTS is an economist with the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She is currently working at the U.S. Trade Representative's mission to the World Trade Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. G. EDWARD SCHUH is the Orville and Jane Freeman Chair in International Trade and Investment Policy at the University of Minnesota. Prior to assuming the Freeman Chair, he was dean of the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs for 10 years. Dr. Schuh's expertise includes international teaching, consulting, and advising experience in Latin America and India, and with the U.S. government. Schuh is a member of the National Research Council Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. BRUCE A. SILVERGLADE, Esq., is legal affairs director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) in Washington, D.C. CSPI is an international nonprofit consumer advocacy organization with approximately 1,000,000 members. Silverglade coordinates CSPI's advocacy activities in a variety of areas involving food and dietary supplement regulation, supervises court litigation involving consumer health issues, and leads CSPI's participation in matters before the Codex Alimentarius Commission. He received his law

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Incorporating Science, Economics, and Sociology in Developing Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards in International Trade: Proceedings of a Conference degree from Boston College and a B.A. in political science from the University of Illinois. V. KERRY SMITH is director of Center for Environmental and Resource Economic Policy, and University Distinguished Professor at the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, North Carolina State University. His current research interests include the conceptual and empirical issues in valuing nonmarket environmental resources such as clean air and water, the use of computable general equilibrium models to understand how environment policies influence international trade, and public policies involving environmental risks. Smith received his Ph.D. in economics from Rutgers University. JOHN D. STARK is an exocologist and entomologist at Washington State University. His research interests involve estimating the fate of pesticides and other xenobiotics in the environment and estimating their effects on populations, communities, and food webs, with particular emphasis on demographic toxicology and modeling. He holds a Ph.D. in pesticide toxicology and entomology from the University of Hawaii. PAUL B. THOMPSON is a professor of philosophy at Purdue University. His focus is on ethics in research and public policy in diverse areas such as food biotechnology, environment, and agriculture. He has a Ph.D. in philosophy from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. DAVID G. VICTOR currently is the Robert W. Johnson, Jr., Fellow for Science and Technology at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. His research focuses on how science and technology affect U.S. foreign policy. Victor received his Ph.D. in political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. DAVID VOGEL is a political scientist and currently holds the George Quist Chair in Business Ethics at the University of California, Berkeley. His current research interests integrate environmental, consumer, and trade policy and explicitly challenges the conventional wisdom that trade liberalization and agreements to promote free trade invariably undermine national health, safety, and environmental standards. Vogel received his Ph.D. in political science from Princeton University. He is the author of Trading Up: Consumer and Environmental Regulation in a Global Economy, Harvard University Press, 1995.