Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Robert E. Deemer (chair) has 25 years of industry experience in the fields of simulation, modeling, virtual proto-typing, collaborative engineering, computer design, onboard spacecraft processor design, and integrated network systems design. He has master's degrees in computer science, management science, business administration, history, and philosophy from California State University, Colorado Technical College, Pepperdine University, University of Southern California, and California State University, respectively. He also has undergraduate degrees in engineering, software design, economics, business management, and English literature. Currently, Mr. Deemer is the vice president of business development/marketing for Catalina Research, Incorporated, and an adjunct faculty member at Regis University, the University of Colorado, and Colorado State University, where he teaches graduate classes in future technology, international science and technology, operations management, and managing change. He also teaches Internet distance learning classes to graduate students from all over the world.

Tora K. Bikson, a senior behavioral scientist at RAND Corporation since 1976, is recognized for her research on the introduction of advanced communication and information technologies and their effects in varied contexts. She recently completed a project to define organizational needs and best practices for creating, managing, and distributing electronic documents (including compound, multimedia, and interactive documents) among United Nations organizations based in Europe, North America, and South America. In projects for other clients, such as the National Science Foundation, the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the Markle Foundation, she has addressed factors that affect the successful institutionalization of new interactive technologies in ongoing communities of practice, how these innovative media influence intra- and interorganizational structures and group processes, their impact on task performance and social outcomes, and their policy implications. Dr. Bikson has co-authored three recent books addressing these issues: Teams and Technology (Harvard Business School Press, 1996), Universal Access to E-mail: Feasibility and Societal Implications (RAND, 1995), and Preserving the Present (Sdu Publishers, 1993). Her work has also appeared in numerous journals and book chapters. Dr. Bikson holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Missouri and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Robert A. Davis is the retired corporate vice president of engineering for The Boeing Company. Since his 41-year career began in 1958 with the introduction of the commercial 707 series of aircraft, he has been associated with all Boeing jet transports in both engineering and management capacities. He led the modernization program for the 747 in 1985 as chief project engineer and became engineering vice president for all commercial airplanes in 1991. He participated in the 777 program, which worked exclusively with computer-aided design and has become an industry benchmark. Mr. Davis became corporate vice president of engineering in 1994, reporting directly to the president. He is a registered professional engineer with a B.S. from the University of British Columbia and an M.S. from the University of Washington. Mr. Davis is a fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Royal Aeronautical Society and president of the International Federation of Airworthiness, which is headquartered in the United Kingdom; a member of General Motors Science Advisory Committee; and a member of the National Research Council Board on Engineering and Manufacturing Design.

Richard T. Kouzes is a senior staff scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), where he works in the area of disarmament and nonproliferation. Formerly, as the director of



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Design in the New Millennium: ADVANCED ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENTS Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Robert E. Deemer (chair) has 25 years of industry experience in the fields of simulation, modeling, virtual proto-typing, collaborative engineering, computer design, onboard spacecraft processor design, and integrated network systems design. He has master's degrees in computer science, management science, business administration, history, and philosophy from California State University, Colorado Technical College, Pepperdine University, University of Southern California, and California State University, respectively. He also has undergraduate degrees in engineering, software design, economics, business management, and English literature. Currently, Mr. Deemer is the vice president of business development/marketing for Catalina Research, Incorporated, and an adjunct faculty member at Regis University, the University of Colorado, and Colorado State University, where he teaches graduate classes in future technology, international science and technology, operations management, and managing change. He also teaches Internet distance learning classes to graduate students from all over the world. Tora K. Bikson, a senior behavioral scientist at RAND Corporation since 1976, is recognized for her research on the introduction of advanced communication and information technologies and their effects in varied contexts. She recently completed a project to define organizational needs and best practices for creating, managing, and distributing electronic documents (including compound, multimedia, and interactive documents) among United Nations organizations based in Europe, North America, and South America. In projects for other clients, such as the National Science Foundation, the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the Markle Foundation, she has addressed factors that affect the successful institutionalization of new interactive technologies in ongoing communities of practice, how these innovative media influence intra- and interorganizational structures and group processes, their impact on task performance and social outcomes, and their policy implications. Dr. Bikson has co-authored three recent books addressing these issues: Teams and Technology (Harvard Business School Press, 1996), Universal Access to E-mail: Feasibility and Societal Implications (RAND, 1995), and Preserving the Present (Sdu Publishers, 1993). Her work has also appeared in numerous journals and book chapters. Dr. Bikson holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Missouri and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Robert A. Davis is the retired corporate vice president of engineering for The Boeing Company. Since his 41-year career began in 1958 with the introduction of the commercial 707 series of aircraft, he has been associated with all Boeing jet transports in both engineering and management capacities. He led the modernization program for the 747 in 1985 as chief project engineer and became engineering vice president for all commercial airplanes in 1991. He participated in the 777 program, which worked exclusively with computer-aided design and has become an industry benchmark. Mr. Davis became corporate vice president of engineering in 1994, reporting directly to the president. He is a registered professional engineer with a B.S. from the University of British Columbia and an M.S. from the University of Washington. Mr. Davis is a fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Royal Aeronautical Society and president of the International Federation of Airworthiness, which is headquartered in the United Kingdom; a member of General Motors Science Advisory Committee; and a member of the National Research Council Board on Engineering and Manufacturing Design. Richard T. Kouzes is a senior staff scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), where he works in the area of disarmament and nonproliferation. Formerly, as the director of

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Design in the New Millennium: ADVANCED ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENTS program development for science and engineering and professor of physics at West Virginia University (WVU), he was responsible for promoting the growth of research and economic development programs in the physical and biological sciences and engineering. His current research is in the field of collaborative computing for the enabling of scientific research independent of geographical location and nuclear physics for disarmament verification. Before moving to WVU, Dr. Kouzes was a staff scientist at PNNL and a principle investigator for DOE 's Distributed Collaboratory Experimental Program. His research program at PNNL was in computer-assisted cooperative work, advanced data acquisition system development, neural network applications, and precision atomic mass measurements. Previously, Dr. Kouzes was a senior research physicist and lecturer at Princeton University, where for 15 years he was a leading researcher in solar neutrino and nuclear structure experimentation. Dr. Kouzes earned his Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University and did postdoctoral work at Indiana University. He is a founder and past chair of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Committee for Computer Applications in Nuclear and Plasma Sciences and the author of more than 70 refereed papers. R. Bowen Loftin has a B.S. in physics from Texas A&M University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in physics from Rice University. He is a professor of computer science and the director of the Virtual Environment Technology Laboratory at the University of Houston and a professor of physics at the University of Houston-Downtown. Dr. Loftin was previously on the faculty of Texas A&M University at Galveston and held a postdoctoral appointment in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Rice University. Since 1983, Dr. Loftin, his students, and coworkers have been exploring the application of advanced software technologies, such as artificial intelligence and interactive, three-dimensional computer graphics, to the development of training systems. Dr. Loftin is a consultant to both industry and government in the areas of advanced training technologies and scientific/ engineering data visualization. He serves on advisory committees and panels sponsored by numerous government and professional organizations. Awards received by Dr. Loftin include the University of Houston-Downtown Award for Excellence in Teaching and Service, the American Association of Artificial Intelligence Award for an innovative application of artificial intelligence, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Public Service Medal, the NASA Space Act Award, and the 1995 NASA Invention of the Year Award. He is the author or coauthor of more than 100 technical publications. James A. Maniscalco has more than 25 years of experience in the energy, aerospace, and automotive industries. Currently, he is a general director of engineering of Delphi Automotive Systems, where he is responsible for the global engineering of Delphi's occupant protection and interior products. To increase Delphi's productivity and reduce its manufacturing costs, Dr. Maniscalco's work focuses on advanced engineering environments and lean engineering initiatives. In the past decade, he has focused primarily on using aerospace capabilities to solve automotive challenges. Key accomplishments include the development of new automotive products, such as electrically powered steering and active controlled suspension. Dr. Maniscalco began his professional career in the U.S. Navy, where he reached the rank of lieutenant commander, and he holds a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy. He was selected as a Fulbright Scholar and earned an M.S. in physics from the University of Turin in Italy. Dr. Maniscalco also has an M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering from Purdue University. He has been a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers since 1991 and is a past member of the American Nuclear Society. He has authored more than 40 technical publications on many topics, including lasers, fusion energy, and accelerators. Robert J. Santoro is the director of the Propulsion Engineering Research Center and a distinguished professor of mechanical engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. He received a Ph.D. in physics from Boston College, where he also held a one-year position as a lecturer. He then joined the Fuels Research Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University as a research engineer. His research there emphasized the study of hydrocarbon oxidation and flame spread over liquids and solids. He left Princeton University to join the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology) in Washington, D.C., where he conducted combustion research until his departure in August 1986. Dr. Santoro was awarded the U.S. Department of Commerce Silver Medal in 1986 for his research on particle diagnostics and soot formation. He is a member of the Combustion Institute, the American Chemical Society, the American Institute of Aeronautical and Astronautics, and the American Physical Society. His research interests include rocket and gas turbine engines, soot formation in flames, liquid spray combustion, laser diagnostics, diesel engine combustion, combustion instability, chemical kinetics, and materials processing. Dr. Santoro collaborates with NASA and the rocket industry on the development of advanced space transportation technology. Daniel P. Schrage has been a professor in the School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology since 1984, director of the Center of Excellence in Rotorcraft Technology (CERT) since 1986, and codirector of the Center for Aerospace Systems Analysis (CASA) since 1998. Dr. Schrage has served as a member of the Army Science Board, the National Research Council Air Force Studies Board, and NASA's Aeronautics Research and Technology Committees. He has also served on the Industry

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Design in the New Millennium: ADVANCED ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENTS Affordability Executive Committee/Task Force of the National Center for Advanced Technologies, which has been industry's voice to the Office of the Secretary of Defense on affordability issues. Dr. Schrage has led much of the executive committee's work on integrated product and process development (IPPD), and the IPPD methodology he developed is being used by the Navy Acquisition Reform Office in much of its IPPD training. Prior to joining the faculty of Georgia Tech, Dr. Schrage served for 10 years as an engineer, manager, and senior executive with the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command. He was the chief of the Structures and Aeromechanics Division and served on the source selection evaluation boards for the AH-64 Apache, UH-60 Black Hawk, and OH-58D Kiowa helicopters. He led the concept development of the LHX, which is now the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter. From 1967 to 1978, Dr. Schrage was on active duty as a U.S. Army field artillery officer and aviator. His service included tours of duty as a battery commander in Europe and as an aviation company platoon leader and battalion operations officer (S-3) in combat in Southeast Asia. Allan Sherman is the chief technologist for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company in Sunnyvale, California. He has 37 years of aerospace experience, particularly in technology development and the design, development, and testing of space systems. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin in 1997, Dr. Sherman was the director of engineering at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. During his 30 years with NASA, he was awarded the Exceptional Engineering Achievement, Outstanding Leadership, and Distinguished Service awards. Prior to his career in NASA, he held engineering positions with Pratt and Whitney and Aerojet-General corporations. Dr. Sherman earned a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Maryland. He chairs the Industrial Advisory Board for the Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Maryland. John Sullivan has been on the faculty of Purdue University since 1975, where he is currently a professor and the head of the School of Astronautics and Aeronautics. His research interests include laser instrumentation (e.g., laser Doppler velocimeters and particle image velocimeters), luminescent sensors for temperature and pressure measurements, and experimental aerodynamics, especially with regard to the comparison of experimental data and the results of computational analysis. Dr. Sullivan has received the John Fluke Award for Excellence in Laboratory Instruction. He holds a B.S. in mechanical and aerospace sciences from the University of Rochester and an M.S. and Sc.D. in aeronautical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Gordon Willis is president of Gordon Willis Associates, a consulting firm specializing in the development and support of AEEs. Mr. Willis retired from Ford in 1999 as chief engineer of automatic transmissions, powertrain operations. He joined Ford in 1976and served in a number of research positions related to computer-aided engineering (CAE) and powertrain control. In 1987, he was named North American automotive operations CAE manager, a position he held for two years before becoming the director of product and manufacturing systems. He was the chassis chief engineer from 1992 to 1994, and then became vehicle chief engineer in Europe. He holds a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.B.A. from the University of Michigan. Michael J. Zyda is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Monterey, California, and chair of the NPS Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation Academic Group. His research interests include computer graphics; large-scale, networked, three-dimensional virtual environments; computer-generated characters; video production; entertainment-defense collaboration; and modeling and simulation. Dr. Zyda was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Virtual Reality Research and Development and the chair of the Committee on Modeling and Simulation: Linking Entertainment and Defense. He is a senior editor for virtual environments for the MIT Press quarterly, Presence, a journal of teleoperation and virtual environments. Dr. Zyda is also a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Computers & Graphics and a member of the Technical Advisory Board of the Fraunhofer Center for Research in Computer Graphics, Providence, Rhode Island. He received a B.A. in bioengineering from the University of California, San Diego, an M.S. in computer science from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a D.Sc. in computer science from Washington University, St. Louis. Dianne S. Wiley, Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board liaison to the Advanced Engineering Environments Committee, recently joined The Boeing Company Phantom Works, where she is responsible for transfer of advanced structures and materials technology to next-generation reusable launch vehicles. Previously, she was with Northrop Grumman for 20 years, where her last position was manager of materials and processes technology in the Integrated Systems and Aerostructures Sector. In that position, Dr. Wiley was responsible for research and development in materials and processes and technology transition to production. While at Northrop Grumman, Dr. Wiley also served as manager of airframe technology in the Business and Advanced Systems Development Group, where she directed five departments performing advanced development and technology transition in structural engineering, materials and processes, and manufacturing technology. During this time, she was responsible for transitioning airframe core technologies into three new business areas (space, biomedicine, and surface ships) to offset declines in traditional business. Previously, as a

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Design in the New Millennium: ADVANCED ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENTS senior technical specialist on the B-2 program, Dr. Wiley was responsible for developing and implementing innovative structural solutions to ensure the structural integrity of the B-2 aircraft. Dr. Wiley's 25 years of technical experience have involved durability and damage tolerance, advanced composites (organic and ceramic), high-temperature structures, smart structures, low-observable structures, concurrent engineering, and rapid prototyping.