Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Jonathan H.Fink (Chair) is vice provost for research and professor of geology at Arizona State University. His research focuses on the rheology, geochemistry, hazards, and emplacement of magma in environments ranging from the sea floor to the surfaces of other planets. He was Director of the Petrology and Geochemistry Program at NSF (1992–1993) and has served on several NSF review panels. He has been an editor of Bulletin of Volcanology, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, and Journal of Geophysical Research, and is a fellow of the Geological Society of America. In 1985, to expand the use of electronic communication among the volcanological community, Fink started Volcano Listserv, which now has more than 2,000 subscribers and is the principal source of volcanic information for scientists, journalists, policy makers, and other interested observers around the world.

Charles B.Connor is a principal scientist at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses at Southwest Research Institute. His research interests include probabilistic analysis of volcanic hazards, geophysics of volcanoes, and mass and heat transfer processes on active volcanoes. His previous positions include associate professor of geology at Florida International University. Currently, he is a consultant on volcanic hazards to the International Atomic Energy Agency for development of agency guidelines on volcanic hazards and analysis of volcanic hazards at nuclear facilities in Armenia and Indonesia. He is member of the Science Committee for Colima Volcano, Mexico, and a member of the American Geophysical Union.

W.Gary Ernst is a professor of geological and environmental sciences at Stanford University, where he has been teaching for 10 years. During the previous 30 years he was professor of geology and geophysics at the UCLA. Ernst studies the deep-seated cores of Circumpacific and Alpline mountain belts as well as intracontinental suture zones in east-central China, the south Urals, and northern Kazakhstan. He investigates the



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Review of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Jonathan H.Fink (Chair) is vice provost for research and professor of geology at Arizona State University. His research focuses on the rheology, geochemistry, hazards, and emplacement of magma in environments ranging from the sea floor to the surfaces of other planets. He was Director of the Petrology and Geochemistry Program at NSF (1992–1993) and has served on several NSF review panels. He has been an editor of Bulletin of Volcanology, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, and Journal of Geophysical Research, and is a fellow of the Geological Society of America. In 1985, to expand the use of electronic communication among the volcanological community, Fink started Volcano Listserv, which now has more than 2,000 subscribers and is the principal source of volcanic information for scientists, journalists, policy makers, and other interested observers around the world. Charles B.Connor is a principal scientist at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses at Southwest Research Institute. His research interests include probabilistic analysis of volcanic hazards, geophysics of volcanoes, and mass and heat transfer processes on active volcanoes. His previous positions include associate professor of geology at Florida International University. Currently, he is a consultant on volcanic hazards to the International Atomic Energy Agency for development of agency guidelines on volcanic hazards and analysis of volcanic hazards at nuclear facilities in Armenia and Indonesia. He is member of the Science Committee for Colima Volcano, Mexico, and a member of the American Geophysical Union. W.Gary Ernst is a professor of geological and environmental sciences at Stanford University, where he has been teaching for 10 years. During the previous 30 years he was professor of geology and geophysics at the UCLA. Ernst studies the deep-seated cores of Circumpacific and Alpline mountain belts as well as intracontinental suture zones in east-central China, the south Urals, and northern Kazakhstan. He investigates the

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Review of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program subsolidus recrystallization of rocks during subduction-zone metamorphism and subsequent exhumation. A trustee of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Ernst is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He served as president of the Mineralogical Society of America (1980–1981) and the Geological Society of America (1985–1986). Richard S.Fiske is a geologist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. His research interests include submarine pyroclastic volcanism south of Japan and the history of explosive eruptions at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. His previous positions include terms as director of the National Museum of Natural History and chief of the USGS Office of Geochemistry and Geophysics. He is fellow of the Geological Society of America and the American Advancement for the Association of Science and is a member of the American Geophysical Union. Catherine J.Hickson is subdivision head of the Geological Survey of Canada’s Vancouver office, Vancouver British Columbia, Canada. Additionally she manages a large multinational geoscience project in South America on behalf of the Canadian government. Her research interests include volcanism (especially subglacial volcanism), geological hazards, regional mapping, and emergency preparedness. She has a strong interest in scientific administration, international relations, and public education. She is a fellow of the Geological Association of Canada and the Geological Society of America in addition to membership in a number of other learned societies. Harry Kim is administrator of the County of Hawaii Civil Defense Agency. A social scientist by training, his current duties are to administrate civil defense responsibilities as defined by the requirements of federal, state, and local governments. He has broad background and practical experience in emergency planning, emergency response, liability issues in emergency management, and risk communication. In the 1980s, he collaborated in the development of a volcanic emergency management handbook for the Office of the United Nations Disaster Relief. In recent years, he has played a major role in enhancing public awareness of the hazard of volcanic air pollution in Hawaii. Stuart A.Rojstaczer is director of the Center for Hydrologic Science and associate professor of geology, environment and engineering at Duke

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Review of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program University. His research interest is to examine a wide range of hydrologic issues—some societally relevant, others of pure intellectual value—in which groundwater plays an essential role. He has held positions at the U.S. Geological Survey, Venice International University and is a visiting scientist at the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Paul Segall is a professor of geophysics at Stanford University. His research interests include earthquake and volcano deformation, inversion of crustal deformation data, the mechanics of faulting, and the global positioning system. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and Geological Society of America. He is presently using GPS to monitor deformation of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii and precise gravity changes to bound the density of magma intruding beneath Long Valley caldera, California. He is currently a member of the USGS Science Advisory Team for Long Valley caldera, the Southern California Integrated GPS Network Advisory Board, and the NSF Instruments and Facilities Program Panel. John Stix is an associate professor of volcanology at McGill University. His research includes the investigation of shallow magmatic processes beneath active volcanoes by geological, geochemical, and geophysical means. He currently has projects at Long Valley caldera in California, Masaya volcano in Nicaragua, and Guagua Pichincha volcano in Ecuador. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the Geological Association of Canada, and the Geological Society of America. Frederick J.Swanson is a research geologist with the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service and Professor (Courtesy) in the Departments of Forest Science and Geoscience, Oregon State University. His research interests include interactions of forest and stream ecosystems with geophysical processes, such as those associated with volcanoes, floods, earthquakes, and wind storms. He also is involved in translation of findings from ecosystem research to management of forest lands and watersheds. For 12 years, he has been principal investigator for the Andrews Experimental Forest’s Long-Term Ecological Research Program, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Tamara L.Dickinson (staff) is a senior program officer for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council. She has served as program director for the Petrology and Geochemistry

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Review of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program Program in the Division of Earth Sciences at the National Science Foundation. She has also served as discipline scientist for the Planetary Materials and Geochemistry Program at NASA Headquarters. As a postdoctoral fellow at the NASA Johnson Space Center, she conducted experiments on the origin and evolution of lunar rocks and highly reduced igneous meteorites. She holds a Ph.D. and a M.S. in geology from the University of New Mexico and a B.A. in geology from the University of Northern Iowa. Rebecca E.Shapack (staff) is a research assistant for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council. She holds a B.S. in mathematical sciences engineering with a concentration in biology from the Johns Hopkins University, and is currently working on her M.S. in public health at the George Washington University.