C

Committee Biographies

Bruce Wald is an adjunct member of the research staff of the Center for Naval Analyses, as well as the founder of Arlington Education Consultants, an independent consulting organization serving both government and industry. Dr. Wald has an extensive background in electronic warfare, communications, space surveillance, and computer architecture, particularly in regard to their implications for naval and national security issues. Following college graduation at the age of 18, Dr. Wald joined the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in 1953, where he spent the next 33 years in positions of progressively increasing line responsibility in system and technology development, in project and group leadership, and in senior management. In his last position at NRL, Dr. Wald served as associate director of research and director of space and communications technology. Previously, he was superintendent of NRL’s Communications Sciences Division, and before that the founding head of its Computer Science Branch. Dr. Wald has served on numerous panels of government advisory and scientific advisory boards, including the Army Science Board, the Defense Science Board, and the Naval Research Advisory Committee. Dr. Wald is currently a member of the NSB.

Alan Berman, an independent consultant, currently consults for the Center for Naval Analyses, where he assists with analyses of Navy R&D investment programs, space operation capabilities, and information operations. He also consults for the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU), where he provides general management support and program appraisal. Dr. Berman’s background is in defense science and technology, particularly in regard to advanced weapon and combat systems. His previous positions include dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami and director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Berman has served on numerous government advisory and scientific boards. He is currently a member of the NSB. He is also a member of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) oversight board that advises Jefferson National Laboratory of the Department of Energy on its FEL program.

A. Douglas Carmichael is professor of power engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Carmichael’s background is in naval propulsion systems. He joined the Department of Ocean Engineering at MIT in 1970, where submarine propulsion was his primary research interest. Prior to joining MIT, Dr. Carmichael was a research fellow at the Imperial College of Science and



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2000 Assessment of the Office of Naval Research’s Marine Corps Science and Technology Program C Committee Biographies Bruce Wald is an adjunct member of the research staff of the Center for Naval Analyses, as well as the founder of Arlington Education Consultants, an independent consulting organization serving both government and industry. Dr. Wald has an extensive background in electronic warfare, communications, space surveillance, and computer architecture, particularly in regard to their implications for naval and national security issues. Following college graduation at the age of 18, Dr. Wald joined the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in 1953, where he spent the next 33 years in positions of progressively increasing line responsibility in system and technology development, in project and group leadership, and in senior management. In his last position at NRL, Dr. Wald served as associate director of research and director of space and communications technology. Previously, he was superintendent of NRL’s Communications Sciences Division, and before that the founding head of its Computer Science Branch. Dr. Wald has served on numerous panels of government advisory and scientific advisory boards, including the Army Science Board, the Defense Science Board, and the Naval Research Advisory Committee. Dr. Wald is currently a member of the NSB. Alan Berman, an independent consultant, currently consults for the Center for Naval Analyses, where he assists with analyses of Navy R&D investment programs, space operation capabilities, and information operations. He also consults for the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU), where he provides general management support and program appraisal. Dr. Berman’s background is in defense science and technology, particularly in regard to advanced weapon and combat systems. His previous positions include dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami and director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Berman has served on numerous government advisory and scientific boards. He is currently a member of the NSB. He is also a member of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) oversight board that advises Jefferson National Laboratory of the Department of Energy on its FEL program. A. Douglas Carmichael is professor of power engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Carmichael’s background is in naval propulsion systems. He joined the Department of Ocean Engineering at MIT in 1970, where submarine propulsion was his primary research interest. Prior to joining MIT, Dr. Carmichael was a research fellow at the Imperial College of Science and

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2000 Assessment of the Office of Naval Research’s Marine Corps Science and Technology Program Technology, London. He is the author of numerous publications on naval propulsion, including design impacts on alternative technologies. He is a fellow of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. Sabrina R. Edlow is research team leader of the Mine Warfare Systems Team at the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA), where she develops and executes the mine warfare program and other mine-warfare related projects. Ms. Edlow recently led an assessment of war plans and executed operations for Desert Thunder and Desert Fox. Her research interests encompass a wide-range of areas, including naval force structure planning, mine warfare, and underwater acoustical systems. A nuclear engineer by training, Ms. Edlow began her career as a design engineer at Duke Power Company, where she coordinated the nuclear fuel supply for seven nuclear reactors. Brig “Chip” Elliott is principal scientist at BBN Technologies. Mr. Elliott’s background is in Internet and wireless network technologies, tactical communications systems, and space-based surveillance and communications. As the technical lead scientist at BBN, he uses Internet technology to build networks for international corporations and U.S. government agencies. He was the chief architect for the networking component of the U.S. Army’s Near-Term Digital Radio Program, which forms the backbone of the Army’s Tactical Internet, for the British Army’s High Capacity Data Radio network, and for the Canadian Army’s IRIS network. He has also acted as lead for a number of low Earth orbit satellite systems (Discoverer II, SBIRS Low, Celestri) as well as a proposed undersea network. Charles A. Fowler, an independent consultant, is retired senior vice president at Mitre Corporation, a federally funded research and development center serving the government on issues relating to national security. Mr. Fowler, a member of the NAE, has an extensive background in military systems, particularly those systems combining sensors, platforms, and command, control, and communications. Mr. Fowler began his career in 1942 as a staff member of the Radiation Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he participated in the development and testing of the GCA radar landing system. He later went on to engineering and management positions at the Raytheon Systems Company before joining Mitre in 1976. Mr. Fowler is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, as well as the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Ray “M” Franklin, a retired Major General, U.S. Marine Corps, is an independent consultant. General Franklin once headed the Marine Corps research and development effort. Today, he serves as an independent consultant on matters related mainly to amphibious warfare and force projection. He is particularly knowledgeable about research and development, systems acquisition, and military operations and training. A naval aviator, General Franklin has experience in both rotary and fixed-wing aircraft. He has participated in numerous government advisory and scientific boards, including that on littoral warfare for the Naval Research Advisory Committee. David B. Kassing is associate corporate research manager for Defense Planning and Analysis at RAND. Mr. Kassing’s background is in military logistics and deployment systems. He recently led an analysis of reception, staging, onward movement, and integration for the U.S. Army and directed a study of future materiel distribution systems for the Department of Defense. Mr. Kassing also reviewed the methodologies used by the Armed Services to set conventional munitions requirements and programs. He is a past president of the Center for Naval Analyses at the University of Rochester. R. Kenneth Lobb is a senior scientist at the Applied Research Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU). Dr. Lobb is an aeronautical engineer whose expertise includes aircraft design, advanced structures, navigation systems, underwater acoustics, underwater vehicles, and systems engineering. Over the course of his career, Dr. Lobb has served in a number of progressively increasing line responsibility positions, including aeronautical engineer at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, technical

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2000 Assessment of the Office of Naval Research’s Marine Corps Science and Technology Program director at the Naval Air Development Center of the Department of Defense, and vice president at the Center for Naval Analyses. Irwin Mendelson is retired president of the Engineering Division of Pratt & Whitney. A mechanical engineer by training, Mr. Mendelson’s background relates primarily to commercial and military aircraft engine design. As president of the Engineering Division at Pratt & Whitney, with a total staff of 8,000 and an annual budget of $900 million, Mr. Mendelson was responsible for the total operation of the division, including the design, development, and assembly of all aircraft engine systems. During his career, Mr. Mendelson has been directly responsible for the design and development of turbofan engines, jet engine fuel controls, pyrophoric ignition systems, and thrust controls for rockets. Herbert Rabin is interim dean of the School of Engineering and director of the Engineering Research Center at the University of Maryland (UMD). A solid-state physicist, Dr. Rabin has an extensive background in applied technology; his research interests include quantum optics and space science. Prior to joining UMD, Dr. Rabin served in a variety of senior positions for the Department of the Navy, including deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for research applications and space technology. Dr. Rabin is a fellow of the American Physical Society. David A. Richwine, a retired Major General, U.S. Marine Corps, is executive vice president of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA), a nonprofit organization whose goals are to provide a forum for government and industry leaders to exchange ideas and concepts, discuss current problems and solutions, and identify future requirements in the technical disciplines of communications, electronics, intelligence, and information systems. General Richwine’s military background is in C4I systems, primarily the interface of these systems with military operations. Before his retirement in 1997 from the Marine Corps, General Richwine served as assistant chief of staff for C4I and director of intelligence for headquarters. Charles H. Sinex is logistics program manager for the Joint Warfare Analysis Department at the Applied Physics Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University (APL/JHU). Dr. Sinex’s background is in operations and systems analyses, with an emphasis on logistics and environmental issues relating to military operations. He recently led a major logistics effort for the deputy under secretary of defense for logistics on technologies for improvement of linkage models between military forces and logistics systems. Prior to this assignment at APL/JHU, Dr. Sinex served as supervisor of the Environmental Group, where he was responsible for numerous environmental survey design efforts. Michael G. Sovereign is professor emeritus of command, control, and communications (C3) at the Naval Postgraduate School. Dr. Sovereign’s background is in C3, joint warfare analysis, and acquisition cost-cycle analysis. He was formerly the director of the Institute of Joint Warfare and served as a visiting research professor for headquarters, U.S. Commander-in-Chief Pacific Fleet, where his responsibilities included conducting research on the Navy’s Virtual Information Center workshops and other experiments aimed at addressing joint C4ISR issues. Dr. Sovereign was also senior principal scientist at SHAPE Technical Center (now NATO C3 Agency), where he participated in major re-planning of NATO C3 systems, and once served as director of special projects in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), where he directed the revision of DOD’s planning, programming, and budgeting system and instituted methods for measuring and budgeting for inflation in weapon systems. Dr. Sovereign has authored numerous articles on instructional media, defense logistics, and economics. Joseph Zeidner is professor emeritus of administrative sciences and psychology at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, George Washington University (GWU). Dr. Zeidner’s background is in

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2000 Assessment of the Office of Naval Research’s Marine Corps Science and Technology Program human resources and the factors involved in learning, training, decision making, and job performance. He has written several books on the economic benefits of predicting job performance and estimating the gains of alternative policies in affecting human performance. He has been influential in personnel classification issues and contributed to the Encyclopedia of Human Intelligence. Prior to joining GWU in 1982, Dr. Zeidner served as the technical director of the U.S. Army Research Institute and as chief psychologist of the U.S. Army.