Board Members' Biographies

Eric J. Barron (Co-chair) is Director of the EMS Environment Institute and Distinguished Professor of Geosciences at Pennsylvania State University. He received his Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Miami. His professional experience encompasses fellow and scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, associate professor of marine geology and geophysics at the University of Miami, and director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State. His specialty is paleoclimatology/paleoceanography. His research emphasizes global change, specifically numerical models of the climate system and the study of climate change throughout Earth history. Dr. Barron is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society.

James R. Mahoney (Co-chair) is the principal of Mahoney Environmental Consultants in McLean, Virginia. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served on the faculty at Harvard University School of Public Health and as senior vice president of the I T Group, Inc., co-founder and senior vice president of Environmental Research and Technology, Inc., and manager of the Environmental Services Group at the Bechtel Group, Inc. Dr. Mahoney was also director of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (1988-1990), coordinating the completion and reporting of the 10-year $550 million federal research and assessment program, and



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FROM RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS IN WEATHER SATELLITES AND NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION: CROSSING THE VALLEY OF DEATH Board Members' Biographies Eric J. Barron (Co-chair) is Director of the EMS Environment Institute and Distinguished Professor of Geosciences at Pennsylvania State University. He received his Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Miami. His professional experience encompasses fellow and scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, associate professor of marine geology and geophysics at the University of Miami, and director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State. His specialty is paleoclimatology/paleoceanography. His research emphasizes global change, specifically numerical models of the climate system and the study of climate change throughout Earth history. Dr. Barron is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society. James R. Mahoney (Co-chair) is the principal of Mahoney Environmental Consultants in McLean, Virginia. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served on the faculty at Harvard University School of Public Health and as senior vice president of the I T Group, Inc., co-founder and senior vice president of Environmental Research and Technology, Inc., and manager of the Environmental Services Group at the Bechtel Group, Inc. Dr. Mahoney was also director of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (1988-1990), coordinating the completion and reporting of the 10-year $550 million federal research and assessment program, and

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FROM RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS IN WEATHER SATELLITES AND NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION: CROSSING THE VALLEY OF DEATH was awarded the Gold Medal for his accomplishments by the Secretary of Commerce. He served as president of the American Meteorological Society from 1990-1991. Susan K. Avery is Director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She received her Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Illinois. She has served on the faculty in the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Illinois, and as associate dean of research and graduate education, College of Engineering, University of Colorado. Her specialty is atmospheric dynamics; her fields of research are wave dynamics, including the coupling of atmospheric regions and interactions between scales of motion, precipitation studies using ground-based radar; and the use of ground-based Doppler radar techniques for observing the neutral atmosphere. Dr. Avery is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, as well as a member of the American Geophysical Union. She is the past chair of the United States Committee to the International Union of Radio Science and a past officer of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. Howard B. Bluestein is Professor of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma, where he has served since 1976. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are the observation and physical understanding of weather phenomena on convective, mesoscale, and synoptic scales. Dr. Bluestein is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies. He is past chair of the NSF Observing Facilities Advisory Panel, the AMS Committee on Severe Local Storms, and UCAR's Scientific Program Evaluation Committee, and a past member of the AMS Board of Meteorological and Oceanographic Education in Universities. He is also the author of a textbook on synoptic-dynamic meteorology and Tornado Alley, a book for the scientific layperson on severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. Lance F. Bosart is a professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the University at Albany/State University of New York, where he has served since 1969. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research

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FROM RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS IN WEATHER SATELLITES AND NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION: CROSSING THE VALLEY OF DEATH specialty is synoptic-dynamic meteorology. He works on a variety of observational problems in the tropics and middle latitudes from the large scale to the mesoscale and on operationally oriented research problems through cooperative research projects with staff members of the National Weather Service under the auspices of the Cooperative Meteorology Education and Training (COMET) program. Dr. Bosart is a member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the Royal Meteorological Society. He was the recipient of the Jule Charney award (AMS). He is a past editor of the journal Monthly Weather Review and presently an associate editor of the journal Weather and Forecasting. Currently he holds an affiliate scientist appointment at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Steven F. Clifford is director of the Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA). He received his Ph.D. in engineering science from Dartmouth College. One of his research goals is to develop a global observing system using ground-based, airborne, and satellite remote sensing systems to better observe and monitor the global environment and use these observations as input to global air-sea circulation models for improving forecasts of weather and climate change. Dr. Clifford is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is also a fellow of the Optical and Acoustical Societies of America, a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a member of the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society. He was the recipient of the 1998 Meritorious Presidential Rank Award. George L. Frederick is Business Development Manager, Meteorological Systems and Services, Radian Electronic Systems, and Principal Scientist/Senior Project Manager, Radian International LLC. He received his M.S. in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Mr. Frederick is responsible for managing atmospheric projects which include design, installation, and data processing of atmospheric measurement systems employing both in-situ and remote sensing techniques. He is working with government, state, and private industry to better employ remote sensing technology for the enhanced monitoring of atmospheric pollutants. Mr. Frederick is a fellow and past president (1999-2000) of the American Meteorological Society.

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FROM RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS IN WEATHER SATELLITES AND NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION: CROSSING THE VALLEY OF DEATH Marvin Geller is a Professor of Atmospheric Science and the Dean and Director of Stony Brook's Marine Sciences Research Center (State University of New York). He received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Geller is a well-known researcher in atmospheric dynamics and serves on several important national and international committees. He is co-chair of the World Climate Research Programme 's SPARC (Stratospheric Processes and Their Role in Climate) project, president of the American Geophysical Union's Atmospheric Sciences section, chair-elect of NASULGC's Board on the Oceans and Atmosphere, president of ICSU's SCOSTEP (Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics), and a fellow of the American Meteorological Society. He has also served on and chaired several NRC panels and committees, including the BASC Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research. Charles E. Kolb is President and Chief Executive Officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University and joined Aerodyne as a senior research scientist in 1971. His research interests have included atmospheric and environmental chemistry, combustion chemistry, materials science, and the chemistry and physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes. Dr. Kolb is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Geophysical Union, where he served as the atmospheric sciences editor of Geophysics Research Letters (1996-1999). He is also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Chemical Society, which honored him with its Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology in 1997. He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the BASC Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry. Judith L. Lean is a research physicist at the Naval Research Laboratory. She received her Ph.D. in Atmospheric Physics from the University of Adelaide, Australia. She specializes in the study of the variability of solar radiation. The focus of her current research is the mechanisms, models, and measurements of variation in the sun's radiative output, and the effects of this variability on the earth's global climate and space weather. Dr. Lean is a member of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society.

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FROM RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS IN WEATHER SATELLITES AND NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION: CROSSING THE VALLEY OF DEATH Roger A. Pielke, Jr. is a scientist at the Environmental and Societal Impacts Group at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. With a B.A. in mathematics and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Colorado, he focuses his research on the relation of scientific information and public and private sector decision making. His current areas of research are societal responses to extreme weather events, domestic and international policy responses to climate change, and United States science policy. In 2000, he received the Sigma Xi Distinguished Lectureship Award. He currently chairs the American Meteorological Society's Committee on Societal Impacts and serves on the Science Steering Committee of the World Meteorological Organization's World Weather Research Programme among other advisory committees. He is a co-author or co-editor of three books, most recently (with D. Sarewitz and R. Byerly) Prediction: Decision making and the future of nature (2000). Michael J. Prather is a professor in the Earth System Science Department at the University of California, Irvine. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from Yale University. His research interests include the simulation of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine atmospheric composition, specifically ozone and other trace gases. Dr. Prather has authored chapters in the World Meteorological Organization's Ozone Assessments (1985-1994) and the IPCC's assessments of climate and aviation effects (1995-2000). He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a foreign member of the Norwegian Academy, and has served on several NRC committees, including the BASC Panel on Climate Variability on Decade-to-Century Time Scales. Robert T. Ryan is Chief Meteorologist at WRC-TV (NBC 4) in Washington, D.C. He received his Masters in atmospheric sciences from the State University of New York, Albany. Prior to his career in broadcasting, he was a research associate in the Physics Section at Arthur D. Little, where his work involved various cloud physics projects with the Department of Defense. He was also involved in various meteorological field experiments for NASA and the U.S. Army. Mr. Ryan is nationally and internationally recognized for his outreach and educational activities in meteorology and atmospheric sciences. He was the first broadcast meteorologist elected to serve as president of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). He has also served the AMS as Councilor, Commissioner of Professional Affairs, and Chairman of the Board of

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FROM RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS IN WEATHER SATELLITES AND NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION: CROSSING THE VALLEY OF DEATH Broadcast Meteorology. In 1997, Mr. Ryan received the Charles Franklin Brooks Award for service to the Society. He has also served on various AMS, NASA, and NOAA study groups, testified a number of times before Congress, and is the winner of nine Emmy awards for his television productions and service to the community. He is a fellow of the AMS and a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Mark R. Schoeberl is a senior atmospheric scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Illinois. He has also served as a scientist at Science Applications, Inc., and at the Naval Research Laboratory. His fields of research include atmospheric dynamics, stratospheric physics and chemistry, and numerical modeling. He is the EOS-Aura Project Scientist. Dr. Schoeberl has received many NASA awards, including the Group Achievement Award in 1988, 1989, 1991, 1994, 1995, and 1998, and the Education and Outreach Award in 1999. In addition he was awarded the Scientific Achievement Medal in 1991, the Distinguished Service Medal in 2000, and the William Nordberg Award for Earth Sciences in 1998. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the past president of the AGU's Atmospheric Sciences section. He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Meteorological Society. Joanne Simpson is Chief Scientist for Meteorology and Senior Fellow at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and an honorary D.Sc. from the State University of New York, Albany. She has served on the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles, and at the University of Virginia. She was also head of the atmospheric physics and chemistry laboratory at ESSA, director of NOAA's Experimental Laboratory, and head of the severe storms branch at NASA Goddard. Her areas of research include atmospheric convection, tropical meteorology, weather modification, and satellite meteorology. Dr. Simpson was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1988. She is a fellow and honorary member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). She has received many awards, including the Charles Franklin Brooks Award and the Meisinger Award from the AMS, the Rossby Research Medal, the Silver and Gold Medals from the Department of Commerce, and NASA's Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal and William Nordberg Award. She has

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FROM RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS IN WEATHER SATELLITES AND NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION: CROSSING THE VALLEY OF DEATH served on several NRC committees and is currently a member of the BASC Committee on Climate, Ecosystems, Infectious Diseases, and Human Health. Nien Dak Sze is Chairman and Founder of Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER), in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Sze received his doctorate from Harvard University. He is one of the original developers of 1- and 2-D stratospheric models that simulated ozone depletions and enabled industry/government to assess the environmental acceptability of alternative CFCs. Dr. Sze predicted the increase in global methane concentration in the mid 1970s before its upward trend was observed. He was among the few theorists who participated in the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) that provided the unprecedented data set relating the Antarctic Ozone Hole to CFCs emissions. Dr. Sze has served as a panel member of the U.S. EPA's Science Advisory Board. He has also served on a panel of the National Academy of Sciences Committee for Scholarly Communication with the People's Republic of China. Other recent appointments include membership on the Harvard University Committee on Environment and the Central Policy Unit of the Government of Hong Kong. He has received three NASA Group Achievement Awards. Thomas F. Tascione is Vice President, Weather Systems Operations, Sterling Software (U.S.), Inc. In this position he oversees the development of a state-of-the-art weather forecasting technology for the Defense Department. In addition, he manages a commercial space weather forecasting service to support the commercial satellite and electric power industries. Another focus area is advanced weather visualization technology for aviation including a patented system to extract and apply weather information along a route a flight using a simple web-browser. His prior professional experience was with the Department of Defense (1972-1993), during which he held numerous weather and space weather forecasting positions. He was the architect of the Air Force space weather forecast models program, and he co-chaired the interagency committee that initiated and developed the National Space Weather Program (NSWP). Dr. Tascione received his Ph.D. in space physics from Rice University. Robert A. Weller is a Senior Scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he holds the Secretary of the Navy/CNO Chair in

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FROM RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS IN WEATHER SATELLITES AND NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION: CROSSING THE VALLEY OF DEATH Oceanography and is Director of the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Ocean Research. He received his Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from the University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research interests include wind-forced motion in the upper ocean; mixed layer dynamics; upper ocean velocity structure studies; air-sea interaction; the role of the ocean in climate; and the development of upper ocean and surface meteorological instrumentation and platforms for air/sea experiments. Dr. Weller received the James B. Macelwane Award from the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in 1986. He is a fellow of the AGU and president of the Ocean Sciences section. He is also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Meteorological Society, and the Oceanographic Society. Eric F. Wood is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University, where he has taught since 1976. He received his Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His areas of research include hydroclimatology with an emphasis on land-atmospheric interaction, hydrological remote sensing, modeling the terrestrial water and energy budgets over a range of scales and hydrologic impact of climate change. Dr. Wood is a member of the NRC Board on Water Science and Technology and the BASC Climate Research Committee. He is a member of the Council and a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). He has received the AGU Robert E. Horton Award, the AMS Horton Lectureship, and the Princeton Rheinstein Award.