Appendix E
Biographies of Committee Members

Mary Jane Osborn, Chair, is professor and head of microbiology at the University of Connecticut Health Center. Dr. Osborn’s specialties are biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and her current research interests include the biogenesis of bacterial membranes. Dr. Osborn has served on numerous distinguished committees, including the National Science Board (1980-1986), the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Sciences (1981-1982), the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health’s Division of Research Grants (1989-1994; chair, 1992-1994), the Advisory Council of the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology (1974-1978), the Board of Scientific Advisors for the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology (1981-1985; chair, 1983-1985), and the Governing Board of the National Research Council (1990-1993). Dr. Osborn is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (President, 1981-1982), the American Chemical Society (chair, Division of Biological Chemistry, 1975-1976), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (fellow; Council, 1988-1992), the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (president, 1982-1983), the American Society for Microbiololgy, and the American Academy of Microbiology.

Norma M. Allewell is associate vice president for sponsored programs and technology transfer at Harvard University. She has expertise in the fields of molecular biophysics, structural biology, and biochemistry, and her research interests include protein structure, function, and design; macromolecular interactions; and computer modeling. Dr. Allewell is a member of the Biophysical Society (president, 1993-1994), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (fellow), the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Sigma Xi.

Jay C. Buckey, Jr, is a research associate professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical School and staff physician at the White River Junction Veteran’s Administration Medical Center. He was coinvestigator on cardiovascular adaptation experiments on the SLS-1 space shuttle mission and, more recently, was payload specialist astronaut on the Neurolab space mission, STS-90, where the experiments focused on the effects of microgravity on the brain and nervous system.



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Review of NASA’s Biomedical Research Program Appendix E Biographies of Committee Members Mary Jane Osborn, Chair, is professor and head of microbiology at the University of Connecticut Health Center. Dr. Osborn’s specialties are biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and her current research interests include the biogenesis of bacterial membranes. Dr. Osborn has served on numerous distinguished committees, including the National Science Board (1980-1986), the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Sciences (1981-1982), the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health’s Division of Research Grants (1989-1994; chair, 1992-1994), the Advisory Council of the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology (1974-1978), the Board of Scientific Advisors for the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology (1981-1985; chair, 1983-1985), and the Governing Board of the National Research Council (1990-1993). Dr. Osborn is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (President, 1981-1982), the American Chemical Society (chair, Division of Biological Chemistry, 1975-1976), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (fellow; Council, 1988-1992), the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (president, 1982-1983), the American Society for Microbiololgy, and the American Academy of Microbiology. Norma M. Allewell is associate vice president for sponsored programs and technology transfer at Harvard University. She has expertise in the fields of molecular biophysics, structural biology, and biochemistry, and her research interests include protein structure, function, and design; macromolecular interactions; and computer modeling. Dr. Allewell is a member of the Biophysical Society (president, 1993-1994), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (fellow), the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Sigma Xi. Jay C. Buckey, Jr, is a research associate professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical School and staff physician at the White River Junction Veteran’s Administration Medical Center. He was coinvestigator on cardiovascular adaptation experiments on the SLS-1 space shuttle mission and, more recently, was payload specialist astronaut on the Neurolab space mission, STS-90, where the experiments focused on the effects of microgravity on the brain and nervous system.

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Review of NASA’s Biomedical Research Program Lynette Jones is a principal research scientist in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Research Laboratory of Electronics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her primary research is on the human proprioceptive system and the role of muscle and cutaneous mechanoreceptors in sensory processes. This research has led to studies of haptic interfaces that are used to interact with computer-generated virtual environments and teleoperated robots. She also does research on the development of wearable health monitoring devices, and she is involved in developing a portable system to evaluate the visual-vestibular system and a non-invasive method to measure glucose levels in people with diabetes. Dr. Jones is a member of the International Society for Psychophysics and the Society for Neuroscience. Robert A. Marcus is director of a program in clinical disorders of bone and mineral metabolism at Stanford University. His primary research interests are acquisition, maintenance, and regulation of bone mass in humans. His laboratory studies hormonal nutrition and physical activity determinants of bone mass. Lawrence A. Palinkas is a professor in the Division of International Health and Cross-Cultural Medicine, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. He is also the director of the UCSD Immigrant/Refugee Health Studies Program and a faculty member of the UCSD/San Diego State University Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology. A medical anthropologist with expertise in behavioral and cross-cultural medicine, he counts as his primary research interests behavior and performance in isolated and confined extreme environments and the cultural context of stress, coping, and illness. He has served on numerous NASA and U.S. Navy advisory groups on behavior and performance. He is a member of the American Public Health Association, the American Anthropological Association (fellow), the Society for Medical Anthropology, the Aerospace Medical Association, the Society for Behavioral Medicine, and the American Psychosomatic Society. Kenna D. Peusner is a professor of anatomy and cell biology at the George Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Peusner is a neurobiologist specializing in intracellular electrophysiological and microscopic techniques to investigate neural structure and function. Her research is focused on characterizing synaptic transmission and ionic conductances and their role in the emergence of excit-ability in the developing and damaged central vestibular system. She is a member of the Neuroscience Society, the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, the New York Academy of Science, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Peusner received the Lindback Foundation award for distinguished teaching in the basic medical sciences, Jefferson Medical College. She is a grantee of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders, National Institutes of Health. Steven E. Pfeiffer is a professor of microbiology at the University of Connecticut Medical School. He has expertise in molecular cell biology and neurobiology, and his research interests are in molecular, cell, and developmental biology of the nervous system and myelinogenesis. Organizations of which he is a member include the American Association of Cell Biologists, the American Society for Neurochemistry, the International Society for Developmental Biology (president, 1996-1998), the International Society for Neurochemistry, and the Society for Neuroscience. Danny A. Riley is a professor of anatomy and cell biology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Riley’s expertise is in the mechanisms of muscle atrophy and nerve regeneration in animal models

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Review of NASA’s Biomedical Research Program and humans, with an emphasis on space biology. He was a recipient of the American Institute of Aviation and Astronautics Jeffries Medical Research Award in 1992 for outstanding contributions to the advancement of aerospace medical research and two NASA Group Achievement awards—for the Cosmos 2044 Biosatellite Team (91) and the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 Team (93). He is an elected member of the Board of Directors of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology (1989-1993, 1997-present). His other memberships include the American Association of Anatomists, the International Society of Electromyographic Kinesiology, the Society for Neuroscience, the American Society for Cell Biology, the Aerospace Medical Association, and the American Institute of Biological Sciences. Richard Setlow is associate director for life sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Setlow is an expert in the fields of radiation biophysics and molecular biology and his research interests include far ultraviolet spectroscopy; ionizing and nonionizing radiation; molecular biophysics; action of light on proteins viruses and cells; nucleic acids; repair mechanisms; and environmental carcinogenesis. Dr. Setlow received the Finsen Medal in 1980 for “outstanding contribution to photobiology and repair of nucleic acids” and the Enrico Fermi Award in 1989 from the U.S. Department of Energy for “pioneering and far-reaching contributions to the fields of radiation biophysics and molecular biology.” His memberships include the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Biophysical Society, the American Society for Photobiology, the Environmental Mutagen Society, and the American Association for Cancer Research. Gerald Sonnenfeld is professor and chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and associate dean for basic sciences and graduate studies at the Morehouse School of Medicine. His expertise in the field of immunology is in interferon and cytokine research. Dr. Sonnenfeld has served on numerous peer review and advisory groups for NASA’s and other agencies’ immunology research programs and as program director of NASA’s Space Biology Research Associates Program. Dr. Sonnenfeld is past president of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology. His other memberships include the American Association of Immunologists, the American Society for Microbiology, the American Society for Virology, the International Cytokine Society, the International Society for Interferon Research (charter member), the International Society for Antiviral Research, Sigma Xi, the Society for Leukocyte Biology, and the Tissue Engineering Society (founding board member). T. Peter Stein is a professor of surgery and nutrition at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. His expertise is in the areas of clinical nutrition and protein and energy metabolism during spacelift; lipid metabolism; clinical nutrition; nutritional assessment; and lung biochemistry. Dr. Stein was a co-winner of the American Institute of Aviation and Astronautics Jeffries Medical Research Award in 1992 for his work on Spacelab Life Sciences-1. His memberships include the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Nutrition, the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, the American Physiological Society, the Society for Parenatal and Enteral Nutrition, the American Chemical Society, the American College of Nutrition, and the American Society for Gravitational Physiology. Judith L. Swain is chair of the Department of Medicine and professor of medicine at Stanford University. Before joining the staff at Stanford, Dr. Swain was the Herbert C. Rorer Professor of Medical Science, professor of genetics, and director of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research expertise includes the study of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular developmental biology, and angiogenesis. Dr. Swain is a member of the Institute of Medicine.