Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$34.95



View/Hide Left Panel

TABLE B-5 Estimates of Within-Subject Variation in Intake, Expressed as Standard Deviation (SD)a and Coefficient of Variation (CV) for Macronutrients and Cholesterol in Adolescents and Children

Nutrientb

Adolescents Ages 9–18 y

Children Ages 4–8 y

 

Females

(n = 1,002)

Males

(n = 998)

Females

(n = 817)

Males

(n = 833)

   

CV

 

CV

 

CV

 

CV

 

SD

(%)

SD

(%)

SD

(%)

SD

(%)

Energy (kcal)

628

34

800

33

427

27

478

27

Fat (total, g)

29.8

45

38.2

42

21.3

37

23.9

37

Fat (saturated, g)

11.3

48

15.3

48

8.5

40

9.6

40

Fat (mono-unsaturated, g)

12.4

48

15.5

44

8.6

39

9.9

41

Fat (poly-unsaturated, g)

7.3

60

8.7

55

5.1

52

5.5

52

Carbohydrate (g)

88.1

35

113

35

61.7

29

70.8

30

Protein (g)

26.2

42

33.9

39

19.2

34

20.4

33

Fiber (g)

6.2

51

8.7

56

4.6

43

5.3

45

Cholesterol (mg)

145

72

199

71

129

70

137

66

NOTE: When the CV is larger than 60 to 70 percent the distribution of daily intakes is nonnormal and the methods presented here are unreliable.

a Square root of the residual variance after accounting for subject, and sequence of observation (gender and age controlled by classifications).

b Nutrient intakes are for food only, data does not include intake from supplements.

SOURCE: Data from Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals1994–1996.

  • , the mean of n days of intake for the individual;

  • SDwithin, the day-to-day standard deviation of the individual's intake for the nutrient;

  • EAR, the median nutrient requirement; and

  • SDr, the standard deviation of requirements in the group.

For nutrients that do not have an EAR, this approach cannot be used. (Guidance on how to assess an individual's usual intake by comparing it to the Adequate Intake [AI] is provided later in this appendix.) When an EAR for the nutrient is provided in a DRI report, the standard deviation of requirements is also available in the form of a coefficient of variation of requirement or percentage of the EAR. In most cases, it is assumed to be 10 percent.

The day-to-day standard deviation in intakes is harder to deter-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement