G
Biographies

HARVEY V. FINEBERG, M.D., M.P.P., Ph.D. (Cochair), became Provost of Harvard University in 1997, following 13 years as Dean of Harvard’s Faculty of Public Health. He has devoted most of his academic career to the fields of health policy and medical decision making. His past research has focused on the process of policy development and implementation, assessment of medical technology, evaluation and use of vaccines, and dissemination of medical innovations. Dr. Fineberg helped found and has served as president of the Society for Medical Decision Making and also served as consultant to the World Health Organization. As a member of the Institute of Medicine, he has chaired and served on numerous panels on health policy issues, ranging from AIDS to new medical technology. He has also served as a member of the Public Health Council of Massachusetts, as chairman of the Health Care Technology Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research, and as president of the Association of Schools of Public Health. He is the author, coauthor, and coeditor of numerous books and articles on such diverse topics as AIDS prevention, vaccine safety and understanding risk in society. In 1988, he received the Joseph W. Mountain Prize from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Wade Hampton Frost Prize from the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Fineberg earned his degrees from Harvard University.

JAMES TRUSSELL, Ph.D. (Cochair), is Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Faculty Associate of the Office of Population Research, and Asso-



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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention G Biographies HARVEY V. FINEBERG, M.D., M.P.P., Ph.D. (Cochair), became Provost of Harvard University in 1997, following 13 years as Dean of Harvard’s Faculty of Public Health. He has devoted most of his academic career to the fields of health policy and medical decision making. His past research has focused on the process of policy development and implementation, assessment of medical technology, evaluation and use of vaccines, and dissemination of medical innovations. Dr. Fineberg helped found and has served as president of the Society for Medical Decision Making and also served as consultant to the World Health Organization. As a member of the Institute of Medicine, he has chaired and served on numerous panels on health policy issues, ranging from AIDS to new medical technology. He has also served as a member of the Public Health Council of Massachusetts, as chairman of the Health Care Technology Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research, and as president of the Association of Schools of Public Health. He is the author, coauthor, and coeditor of numerous books and articles on such diverse topics as AIDS prevention, vaccine safety and understanding risk in society. In 1988, he received the Joseph W. Mountain Prize from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Wade Hampton Frost Prize from the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Fineberg earned his degrees from Harvard University. JAMES TRUSSELL, Ph.D. (Cochair), is Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Faculty Associate of the Office of Population Research, and Asso-

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention ciate Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Dr. Trussell is the author or coauthor of more than 175 scientific publications, primarily in the areas of reproductive health and demographic methodology. His recent research has been focused in three areas: emergency contraception, contraceptive failure, and the cost-effectiveness of contraception. Dr. Trussell received his Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. Dr. Trussell currently serves as a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research; as a member of the board of directors of The Alan Guttmacher Institute, the NARAL Foundation, and the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals; and as a member of the Council of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population and the technical advisory committee of Family Health International. He also serves on the editorial advisory committee of Contraception, Family Planning Perspectives, Contraceptive Technology Update, and the Journal of the Australian Population Association. RAYMOND BAXTER, Ph.D., is Executive Vice President of The Lewin Group and heads the firm’s national research, policy, and management practice. His research and consulting focus on community health, health systems reform, policy development, organizational change and strategic planning. He has worked with government and the private sector at the state, local and national level, and has over 20 years of experience in public health management, including heading the San Francisco Department of Public Health and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Dr. Baxter currently leads an evaluation of the nation’s disease surveillance capacity for the Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services. For the past four years he has assisted General Motors, Chrysler, Ford and the United Auto Workers in a national initiative to assess local health system performance and to organize collaborative planning among purchasers, providers and consumers to reduce costs and improve quality. Dr. Baxter has headed the 12-site community tracking initiative of the Center for Studying Health System Change, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He is completing a multiyear goal-level evaluation of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s community health grant-making and has led evaluation initiatives for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the California Endowment, the David & Lucile Packard Foundation, and the federal government. Dr. Baxter has assisted numerous public, not-for-profit and private organizations in strategic plans, reorganizations and special projects. Dr. Baxter holds a Ph.D. from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. WILLARD CATES, JR., M.D., M.P.H., is President of the Family Health Institute of Family Health International (FHI) in North Carolina. He received

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention a combined M.D.-M.P.H. degree from Yale School of Medicine, and trained clinically in Internal Medicine at the University of Virginia Hospital. He is board certified in Preventive Medicine. He is currently Principal Investigator of the Leadership Core of the HIV Prevention Trials Network, funded by NIH. He also is a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention. Prior to joining FHI, Dr. Cates was at CDC for two decades, where he served as Director of the Division of STD/HIV Prevention for half that time. Dr. Cates is a Member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, the American College of Epidemiology, and past President of the Society for Epidemiologic Research. He is coauthor of two major reproductive health textbooks, and has authored or co-authored over 400 scientific publications. He is a Visiting Professor of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health, the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, and the University of Michigan School of Public Health. MYRON S. COHEN, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology at University of North Carolina (UNC), Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, and Director of the UNC Center for HIV/ STDs and Infectious Diseases. Dr. Cohen is on the Board of Directors of the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Disease Research and has served on a number of advisory committees for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Cohen is Director of the NIH Sexually Transmitted Diseases Clinical Trials Network, the UNC U.S. Agency for International Development IMPACT (AIDS Prevention) Program, and the Johns Hopkins/UNC HIVNET Program. He is chair of the NIH HIV Prevention Treatment Network Antiretroviral Working Group. He is also codirector of the UNC/NIH Fogarty Center and Associate Director of the UNC/NIH Center for AIDS Research and UNC/NIH STD Cooperative Research Center. Dr. Cohen’s research interests focus on the transmission and prevention of STDs and HIV. He received his M.D. from Rush Medical College, and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Michigan and postdoctoral fellowship in infectious diseases at Yale University. ANKE A. EHRHARDT, Ph.D., is the Director of the HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and is a Professor of Medical Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University. Dr. Ehrhardt came to Columbia University from the State University of New York at Buffalo where she codirected the Program of Psychoendocrinology at Children’s Hospital. She was also formerly the President of the International Academy of Sex Research. Dr.

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention Ehrhardt is an internationally known researcher in the field of sexual and gender development of children, adolescents, and adults. For the past 25 years, her research has included a wide range of studies on determinants of sexual risk behavior among children, adolescents, heterosexual women and men, and the gay population, and on comprehensive approaches to preventing HIV and STD infection. In recognition of this work, she was presented with the Research Award “For Excellence in Research” from the State of New York Office of Mental Health in 1990 and the Award for Distinguished Scientific Achievement for 1991, from the Society for the Scientific Study of Sex. She has more than 160 scientific publications and has co-authored several books. Dr. Ehrhardt received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Düsseldorf, Germany and completed a postgraduate fellowship in the Psychohormonal Research Unit at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. BRIAN FLAY, D.Phil., is the founding director of the Prevention Research Center in the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and currently serves as the Director of the Health Research and Policy Centers and Professor of Community Health Sciences and Psychology. Dr. Flay’s research interests include smoking and drug abuse etiology and prevention, HIV/AIDS and violence prevention, risk-taking behaviors among adolescents, and school- and community-based interventions. Dr. Flay has served on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention committees for HIV/AIDS prevention research, and the development of comprehensive school health guidelines. He served on the Expert Panel on the Evaluation of AIDS Interventions for the Committee on AIDS Research in Behavioral, Social and Statistical Sciences of the National Academy of Sciences. He was also an advisor to OSAP/CSAP on high-risk youth, media interventions and school-based interventions. In 1993, Dr. Flay received recognition for outstanding research from the Research Council of the American School Health Association. From 1994 to 1998, Dr. Flay served on several CDC and National Institutes of Health National Advisory Committees on prevention or behavioral research (NIMH, NIDA, NIAAA, NIAID, and NCI). Dr. Flay has published more than 140 peer-reviewed publications and 25 book chapters. He is a fellow of the Society for Behavioral Medicine and the Society for Community Research and Action and is a member of the Robert Wood Johnson Funded Research Network on the Etiology of Tobacco Dependence. Dr. Flay received his D.Phil. in Social Psychology from Waikato University in New Zealand and completed postdoctoral training in evaluation research and social psychology at Northwestern University under a Fulbright/Hays Fellowship.

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention LORETTA JEMMOTT, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., is Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Urban Health Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, and holds a secondary appointment in the Graduate School of Education. Dr. Jemmott received her M.S.N. in nursing, specializing in psychiatric mental health nursing, and her Ph.D. in education, specializing in human sexuality education, from the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1987, Dr. Jemmott’s research has focused on designing and testing theory-based, culturally sensitive and developmentally appropriate strategies to reduce HIV risk-associated sexual behaviors among African American and Latino populations. Dr. Jemmott has directed multiple HIV risk-reduction research projects and has published extensively in the areas of HIV/AIDS prevention and adolescent sexual behavior. She has received many awards for her research and community efforts, including the Congressional Merit Recognition Award, the Outstanding Research Award from the Northern New Jersey Black Nurses Association, and the Governor of New Jersey’s Nurse Merit Award in Advanced Nurse Practice. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and a member of the National Institute of Nursing Research’s Advisory Council and the Institute of Medicine. EDWARD H. KAPLAN, Ph.D., is the William N. and Marie A. Beach Professor of Management Sciences at the Yale School of Management, Professor of Public Health at the Yale School of Medicine, and Director of the Law, Policy and Ethics Core at Yale’s Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. Professor Kaplan received his three master’s degrees (in Operations Research, City Planning, and Statistics) and his Doctorate in Urban Studies from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Kaplan is an expert in operations research and statistics and has developed novel methods for quantitatively evaluating HIV intervention programs. His current research links the operations of HIV prevention programs to epidemic outcomes, examines the cost-effectiveness of individual intervention programs, and proposes approaches to allocating HIV prevention resources. His past research demonstrating the effectiveness of New Haven’s needle exchange program remains among the most creative and important examples of HIV program evaluation to date. He has authored more than 80 peer-reviewed publications and coedited the book Modeling the AIDS Epidemic: Planning, Policy and Prediction. For his applications of mathematical and statistical modeling to the study of HIV prevention, he was awarded the 1992 Franz Edelman Management Science Achievement Award, the 1994 Lanchester Prize for the best work in the operations research field, and in 2000 was inducted into the Omega Rho Operations Research Honor Society as an honorary member. Professor Kaplan was twice awarded the Lady Davis Visiting Professorship at the

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he studied AIDS policy issues facing the State of Israel. Professor Kaplan serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of AIDS, Health Care Management Science, Journal of Mathematics Applied to Medicine and Biology, and Operations Research. NANCY KASS, Sc.D., is Associate Professor and Director of the Program in Law, Ethics and Health, in the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. She is also Associate Professor in the Bioethics Institute at The Johns Hopkins University, and a Fellow of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown. Dr. Kass conducts empirical work in bioethics and health policy. She has published extensively in the fields of HIV/AIDS policy, genetics policy, and research ethics, and is coeditor with Ruth Faden of HIV, AIDS, and Childbearing: Public Policy, Private Lives. She served as consultant to the President’s Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, as a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Perinatal Transmission of HIV, and is currently working with the National Bioethics Advisory Commission to examine American investigators’ experiences working in developing countries. Other current research projects are focused on genetics and privacy; informed consent in early phase cancer trials, end-of-life decision making; and ethics issues arising in international health research. Dr. Kass completed her doctoral training in health policy from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and was awarded a National Research Service Award to complete a postdoctoral fellowship in bioethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. MARSHA LILLIE-BLANTON, Dr.P.H., is Vice-President of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation where she directs the Foundation’s policy research and grant-making on access to care for vulnerable populations. Prior to joining the Foundation, Dr. Lillie-Blanton served as Associate Director of Health Services Quality and Public Health Issues of the U.S. General Accounting Office. Dr. Lillie-Blanton has over fifteen years of experience in health policy research, including serving formerly as Associate Director of the Kaiser Commission on the Future of Medicaid. From 1990 to 1994, Dr. Lillie-Blanton was assistant professor of health policy and management at The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. She currently holds an adjunct faculty position in The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Her primary research interests are in the areas of substance abuse programs and policies and minority health. Her efforts in directing the work of eight research teams analyzing data from the National Medical Expenditure Survey resulted in the publication of Achieving Equitable Access: Studies of Health Care Issues Affecting Hispanics and African Americans. Dr. Lillie-Blanton is a member of Medic-

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention aid Advisory Committee of the D.C. Department of Health, the National Advisory Council for the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, and an elected member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. Dr. Lillie-Blanton received her master’s and doctorate degree from The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. MICHAEL MERSON, M.D., is Dean of Public Health and Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, and the Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS at Yale University. Dr. Merson received his medical degree from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. After serving as a medical intern and resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital, he spent three years in the Enteric Diseases Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and then served as the Chief Epidemiologist at the Cholera Research Laboratory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In 1978, he joined the World Health Organization’s Diarrheal Disease Control Programme in Geneva, Switzerland and served as Director of that Programme from 1984 until 1990. In 1987, he was also appointed Director of the WHO Acute Respiratory Infections Control Programme. He was appointed as Director in 1990 and later as Executive Director in 1993 of the WHO Global Programme on AIDS, which was responsible for mobilizing and coordinating the global response to the AIDS pandemic. Dr. Merson received two Commendation Medals from the U.S. Public Health Service, the Arthur S. Flemming Award, the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal, and two honorary degrees. He has served on various National Institutes of Health review panels, advisory committees and institutional boards, and has been elected to the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering and the American Epidemiological Society. EDWARD TRAPIDO, Sc.D., is Professor and Vice Chairman in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Miami School of Medicine. He is also an Associate Director of the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Chief of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. Dr. Trapido is the Principal Investigator for the Florida Cancer Data System; the Cancer Information Service for Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands; and the National Hispanic Leadership Initiative on Cancer. He is also Director and Principal Investigator of the Research and Evaluation Coordinating Center for the State of Florida Tobacco Pilot Program. After earning his master’s degree in parasitology from the University of North Carolina, Dr. Trapido was an instructor in environmental health and community medicine at New York’s Downstate Medical Center. He then received both a Master’s and Sc.D. in Epidemiology from Harvard School of Public Health. Prior to coming to

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention Miami, Dr. Trapido was a staff fellow in the Division of Cancer Etiology at the National Cancer Institute. His research interests are in tobacco prevention programs and their evaluation, and in working with minority and underserved populations in cancer prevention and control. STEN H. VERMUND, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Epidemiology and International Health, Medicine, and Pediatrics and serves both as Director of the Division of Geographic Medicine and Director of the John J. Sparkman Center for International Public Health Education at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. In addition, he is President of the Gorgas Memorial Institute for Tropical and Preventive Medicine, Inc. Dr. Vermund is an infectious disease epidemiologist and pediatrician with substantial research and training experience overseas. He began his career focused on parasitic infections of public health importance in the Caribbean and Central America. In the late 1980s, his work evolved towards the epidemiology of emerging viruses, first as related to immunosuppression-related parasites, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis, and later related to human papillomavirus (HPV). The expansion of the HIV epidemic led Dr. Vermund to increasingly focus on the epidemiology and control of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV and HPV-HIV interactions. From 1988 to 1994, Dr. Vermund was chief of the Vaccine Trials and Epidemiology Branch, Division of AIDS, at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, that resulted in two special commendations from the Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service. His work in HIV vaccine clinical trial preparedness led to the 1994 Superior Service Award, the highest civilian honor in the Public Health Service. Dr. Vermund is now engaged in several HIV/AIDS prevention-related initiatives supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. PAUL VOLBERDING, M.D., is Professor of Medicine, Director of the Positive Health Program and Department of Clinical Oncology, and the founding Director of the Center for AIDS Research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Volberding received his M.D. from the University of Minnesota, and completed his residency training at the University of Utah Medical Center. He is board certified in internal medicine and oncology. Although an oncologist by training, Dr. Volberding has devoted the majority of his efforts to establishing comprehensive and multidisciplinary systems of care for HIV-infected persons and to conducting clinical investigations of antiretroviral drugs. His particular interests include testing strategies for improving HIV outcomes by optimizing the timing and choice of therapy. As the codirector of the UCSF Center

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention for AIDS Research, he facilitates and conducts translational research crossing the boundaries of basic, clinical, and behavioral sciences. Dr. Volberding also directs a comprehensive HIV-focused website (HIVInSite) and chairs a nonprofit educational organization, International AIDS Society-USA. Dr. Volberding is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has served on several committees addressing HIV/AIDS issues. ANDREW ZOLOPA, M.D., is Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is also the Director of the Stanford Positive Care Program, the Chief of the AIDS Medicine Division at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Dr. Zolopa received his M.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine, was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar, and completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center. He is board certified in infectious diseases and maintains an active HIV clinical practice at Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Zolopa’s past research includes population-based studies of HIV and TB prevalence and risk factors in homeless populations. This work has led to ongoing studies of HIV treatment, adherence to antiretrovirals, and drug resistance in inner-city urban populations in which he collaborates. Since 1996, Dr. Zolopa has been actively involved in clinical investigation with a particular focus on the role of HIV-1 resistance testing in treatment. He is a Co-Investigator with Stanford University’s AIDS Clinical trials Group (ACTG) and is the Co-Founder of the Clinicbased Investigator’s group (CBIG)—a national multi-center group evaluating the effectiveness and safety of antiretroviral therapies through observational cohort studies. Expert Consultants IVAN JUZANG, M.B.A., is founder and President of MEE Productions, Inc. Since 1990, MEE has provided communication research, media production, and marketing services to both private and public sector clients in the United States and abroad. Mr. Juzang manages and produces all of MEE’s research-based communication projects targeting African Americans and urban youth, and designs and directs MEE’s urban marketing campaigns and community teams. He has moderated hundreds of MEE focus groups and has been a primary researcher in all of MEE’s national studies. MEE first received prominence with the release of its primary research study funded by funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, entitled The MEE Report: “Reaching the Hip-Hop Generation,” which identified effective communication strategies to encourage prosocial behavior among inner-city teenagers around alcohol and tobacco

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention prevention. Currently, Mr. Juzang serves as a board member of the Alan Guttmacher Institute. Mr. Juzang was also an Adjunct Professor at Temple University’s School of Communications, Department of Broadcasting Telecommunications and Mass Media. Mr. Juzang received his M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business. MICHAEL A. STOTO, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. Dr. Stoto received an A.B. in Statistics from Princeton University, and an A.M. and Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University in 1979. He was an Associate Professor of Public Policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and is an Adjunct Professor of Biostatistics in the Harvard School of Public Health. From 1987 through 1998, Dr. Stoto served as a Senior Staff Officer and Director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. He is currently a consultant to the IOM on a variety of public health issues. Dr. Stoto’s research and teaching interests include a variety of topics related to the use of statistical data and quantitative analysis in public health policy. His research interests include methodological topics in epidemiology, biostatistics, and demography, as well as substantive issues in public health policy and practice. He also has strong interests in research synthesis and meta-analysis, community health assessment, risk analysis and management, and the evaluation of public health interventions. At the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Stoto was responsible for projects in occupational and environmental health (including Veterans and Agent Orange), HIV/AIDS (such as HIV and the Blood Supply), maternal and child health (including Reducing the Odds: Preventing Perinatal Transmission of HIV in the United States) and public health practice (such as Healthy Communities and Improving Health in the Community). Liaisons from the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention JOYCE SEIKO KOBAYASHI, M.D., is currently Director of the HIV/ AIDS Neuropsychiatric Consultation Service at Denver Health Medical Center, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and Associate Faculty member of the Department of Healthcare Ethics, Humanities and the Law there. Dr. Kobayashi received her undergraduate training at Stanford University, her M.D. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine, and completed her psychiatric training at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She completed a subspecialty fellowship in Consultation/Liaison Psychiatry through Mt. Sinai College of Medicine, and has since spe-

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention cialized in the psychiatric treatment of people with HIV/AIDS. She was an American Psychiatric Association / National Institute of Mental Health (APA/NIMH) Minority Fellow and has served on a number of national Committees and Councils of the APA. During her tenure as Chairperson of the APA Committee of Asian American Psychiatrists, she organized the first International Symposium on Psychiatric Research in Asia. She has served for many years as a member of the National Commission on AIDS of the APA, where she was one of the authors of the needle exchange policy for the Association. She served as a national examiner for the Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She has been the recipient of several awards, including the Dinkelspiel Award at Stanford, Colorado Woman of the Year in Health and Human Services from the Colorado Asian Pacific Women’s Network, and Rocky Mountain Regional AIDS Conference Award for Service to People with AIDS. Dr. Kobayashi has published a variety of articles and chapters on HIV/AIDS, biomedical ethics, women’s issues, transcultural psychiatry and has given invited lectures at regional and national AIDS meetings. KATHLEEN E. TOOMEY, M.D., M.P.H., is Director of the Division of Public Health, Georgia Department of Human Resources. Dr. Toomey received her M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health. After completing a residency in family medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle, she served as clinical director of the Kotzebue Service Unit with the Indian Health Service in Northwest Alaska. She was then selected as a Pew Health Policy Research Fellow at the University of California, San Francisco, Institute for Health Policy Studies, where she worked under former Assistant Secretary for Health, Dr. Philip R. Lee. She later held a number of positions in the Division of STD/HIV Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention including EIS officer and Associate Director. She then served as a legislative assistant on health issues for U.S. Senator John Chafee (R-RI). She received the CDC Award for Contributions to the Advancement of Women and the Public Health Service Plaque for Outstanding Leadership. Dr. Toomey has served on the boards of many professional and national organizations, including the American Public Health Association and the Alan Guttmacher Institute. She currently chairs the Public Health Committee of the Georgia Academy of Family Physicians and serves on the Public Health and Preventive Medicine Committee of the Medical Association of Georgia. Dr. Toomey holds faculty appointments at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Emory School of Medicine, and Morehouse University School of Medicine. Her research interests include women’s health and reproductive health policy, health

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention services in underserved areas, and the epidemiology and prevention of STDs and HIV/AIDS. Staff MONICA S. RUIZ, Ph.D., M.P.H. is a Senior Program Officer at the Institute of Medicine and the Study Director for the Committee on HIV Prevention Strategies. Prior to joining the IOM in 1999, she was a Research Associate at the University of Connecticut, where she worked with colleagues at the Yale AIDS Program in developing a clinician-delivered prevention intervention for HIV-infected persons in outpatient care. In 1998, Dr. Ruiz served as the Counseling and Social Support Advisor for the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) in Geneva, Switzerland; while in that post, she also served as the UNAIDS liaison to The Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing Efficacy Study. Dr. Ruiz received her doctorate in Preventive Medicine from the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and her Masters degree in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley. She also completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies at the University of California, San Francisco. ALICIA R. GABLE, M.P.H., is a Research Associate for the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on HIV Prevention Strategies. Prior to joining the IOM’s Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in 1999, Ms. Gable completed a fellowship in health services administration at the Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC. Ms. Gable also worked as an economist at Research Triangle Institute and Triangle Economic Research in Durham, NC, where she conducted several health valuation surveys and natural resource damage assessment studies. Ms. Gable holds an M.P.H. in health management and policy from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and a B.A. in economics and international studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ROSE MARIE MARTINEZ, Sc.D., is the Director of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Prior to joining the IOM, she was a Senior Health Researcher at Mathematica Policy Research where she conducted research on the impact of health system change on the public health infrastructure, access to care for vulnerable populations, managed care, and the health care workforce. Dr. Martinez is a former Assistant Director for Health Financing and Policy with the U.S. General Accounting Office where she directed evaluations and policy analysis in the area of national and public health

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No Time to Lose: Getting More from HIV Prevention issues. Dr. Martinez received her doctorate from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. DONNA ALMARIO is the research assistant for the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Committee on HIV Prevention Strategies. Ms. Almario joined the IOM’s Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in 1997 and has worked on other IOM studies including, Reducing the Odds: Preventing Perinatal Transmission of HIV in the United States and Ending Neglect: Eliminating Tuberculosis in the United States. Prior to joining the IOM, she worked at Georgetown University Medical Center’s Lombardi Cancer Center. Ms. Almario graduated from Vassar College with a biopsychology degree and is presently working towards a masters in public health degree at the George Washington University’s School of Public Health and Health Services. ANNA STATON is the project assistant for the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Committee on HIV Prevention Strategies. Ms. Staton joined the IOM’s Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in 1999. Prior to joining the IOM, she worked at the Baltimore Women’s Health Study. Ms. Staton graduated from the University of Maryland Baltimore County with a visual arts (major) and women’s studies (minor) degree. She is currently working toward a masters in public administration degree at George Washington University’s School of Business and Public Management.