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Science and Technology in the National Interest: THE PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTMENT PROCESS

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: THE PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTMENT PROCESS PANEL D. Allan Bromley is the Sterling Professor of the Sciences and dean of engineering at Yale University. He served as the assistant to the president for science and technology and was the director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1989 to 1993. At Yale, he has served as the associate director of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, the chairman of the Physics Department, and the director of the A. W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory. He received his PhD in physics from the University of Rochester. Dr. Bromley was awarded the US National Medal of Science in 1989. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Physical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. E. Edward David is the president of EED, Inc and consults on R&D, strategic planning and management, intellectual property, technology transfer, enhancing corporate research programs, and developing corporate-academic research partnerships for the Washington Advisory Group. He received his PhD in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. David served as science advisor to the president and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1970 to 1973. From 1977 to 1986, he was president of Exxon Research and Engineering Company. Dr. David spent the first 2 decades of his research career at Bell Telephone Laboratories, finally as executive director. He is on the boards of several businesses and on technical advisory boards nationally and abroad. Dr. David is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences. John H. Gibbons is Special Advisor, US Undersecretary of State for Global Affairs. He served as assistant to the president for science and technology and as the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, both beginning in 1993. Before then, he was the director of Office of Technology Assessment (1979-1993) of the US Congress. He was a professor of physics and the director of energy, environment and resources at the University of Tennessee (1974-1979). He received his PhD in physics from Duke University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Mary L. Good (Chair) is Dean, Donaghey College of Information Science and System Engineering, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and a managing member at Venture Capital Investors, LLC. She received her PhD in inorganic chemistry and radiochemistry from the University of Arkansas. Dr. Good served as the undersecretary for technology in the US Department of Commerce from 1993 until recently. Before that, she worked as a Senior vice president for technology, and director of research for Allied Signal, Inc (1985-1993). She also served as a vice president and director of research at UOP, Inc. (formerly Universal Oil Products) from 1980 to 1985. She has served as the vice-chairman and chairman of the National Science Board and is a member of the National Academy of Engineeri ng. M.R.C. Greenwood is chancellor and professor of biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, a position she has held since July 1, 1996. Earlier, she served as dean of graduate studies, vice provost for academic outreach, and professor of biology and internal medicine at the University of California, Davis. Previously, Dr. Greenwood taught at Vassar College, where she was the John Guy Vassar Professor of Natural Sciences, chair of the Department of Biology, and director of the Undergraduate Research Summer Institute. She received her PhD in physiologic developmental biology and neuroscience from Rockefeller University. From November 1993 to May 1995, Dr. Greenwood was associate director for science at the Office of Science and Technology Policy. She was, in 1998, president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and now serves as its Board chair. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Anita K. Jones is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Virginia. She was an assistant and then associate professor of computer science at Carnegie-Mellon University until 1982. From 1981 to 1987 she was vice president and cofounder of Tartan Laboratories. She received her PhD in computer science from CMU. In 1988, she started at the University of Virginia as a professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science. From 1993 to 1997 she served at the US Department of Defense, where, as director of defense research and engineering, she oversaw the department's science and technology program, research laboratories, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. She has received the US Air Force Meritorious Civilian Service Award, a Distinguished Public Service Award, and a tribute in the Congressional Record from Senator Charles Robb. She now serves on the National Science Board and the Defense Science Board. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: THE PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTMENT PROCESS Martha A. Krebs is a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Defense Analysis in Alexandria, Virginia. She was director of the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy from 1993 to 2000. Previously, she was associate laboratory director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, deputy staff director and then staff director of the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the House Committee on Science and Technology, and a consultant to the House Committee on Science and Technology. She received her PhD in physics from Catholic University. John P. McTague was the vice president for technical affairs at the Ford Motor Company. He received his PhD in physical chemistry from Brown University. Dr. McTague also served as the acting science adviser to the president and the deputy director and later acting director, of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, beginning in 1986. Before that he taught chemistry at University of California, Los Angeles and Columbia University and was the director of the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. John H. Moxley III is a vice president and partner at Korn/Ferry International and serves as the managing director of its North American Health Care Division. He received his MD from Colorado University: He has been a senior vice president of the American Medical International in Beverly Hills (1981-1988 ) and an assistant secretary of defense (1980-1981). He also served as chancellor of health sciences and the dean of the School of Medicine at the University of California -San Diego, associate professor of medicine and dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Maryland, and instructor of medicine and assistant to the dean at Harvard University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. H. Guyford Stever is trustee of various scientific organizations and a consultant on science issues. He was science and technology advisor to President Ford in 1976-1977. From 1972 to 1976, he was director of the National Science Foundation. He was president of Carnegie-Mellon University from 1965 to 1972, chief scientist of the Air Force from 1955 to 1965, and professor of aeronautical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1964 to 1965. He received degrees from Colgate University and the California Institute of Technology. In 1991, he was awarded the National Medal of Science. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering, of which he was a foreign secretary in 1984-1988. Janet L. Yellen is the Eugene E. and Catherine M. Trefethen Professor of Business Administration at the Haas School of Business, where she has worked since 1980, and is also a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. She was chair of the Council of Economic Advisors (1997-1999) and a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (1994-1997). She received her PhD in economics from Yale University. Dr. Yellen is a senior adviser for the Brookings Panel on Economic Activity, and an adviser for the Congressional Budget Office.

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Science and Technology in the National Interest: THE PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTMENT PROCESS STAFF Richard E. Bissell is executive director of Policy and Global Affairs of the National Research Council and director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. He served as coordinator of the Interim Secretariat of the World Commission on Dams (1997-1998) and as a member and chair of the Inspection Panel at the World Bank (1994-1997). He held senior positions at the US Agency for International Development from 1986-1993 as head of both the Bureau of Science and Technology and the Bureau of Program and Policy Coordination. He has published widely in political economy and has taught at Georgetown University and the University of Pennsylvania. He received his BA from Stanford University (1968) and his MA and PhD from Tufts University (1970 and 1973). Deborah D. Stine is study director and associate director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), director of the Office of Special Projects, and director of the National Academies Christine Mirzayan Internship Program. She has worked on various projects in the National Academies since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study for COSEPUP, on policy implications of greenhouse warming, and a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management. She holds a bachelor 's degree in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine; a master's degree in business administration from Texas A&M; and a PhD in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from the American University. Before coming to the National Academies, she was a mathematician for the US Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the state of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. William G. Wells, Jr. is a domestic and international consultant and trainer and a professor of management science at the School of Business and Public Management of George Washington University, Washington, DC. He is associated with the University of California, Santa Cruz as a consultant to the chancellor. He served in the US Air Force for 22 years in operational and management positions (he retired as a colonel), on the staff of the US House of Representatives for 14 years, and with the American Association for the Advancement of Science as a senior executive for 5 years. He served as chief of staff to President Bush's science and technology adviser (D. Allan Bromley) and as senior consultant to President Clinton's science and technology advisers (Jack Gibbons and Neal Lane) on a variety of issues, including S&T-related appointments. Colleen Preston heads her consulting business, Preston and Associates, which focuses on business process re-engineering and the federal acquisition system. She began her career as an associate in the Orlando firm of Akerman, Senteritt, and Eidson. A member of the Florida Board and the American Bar Association Section of Public Contract Law, Mrs. Preston served as an attorney-adviser in the Office of the General Counsel, Office of the Secretary of the US Air Force. She received her law degree from the University of Florida. She gained much experience in acquisition and procurement through her service as counsel to the Air Force Contract Adjustment Board and Debarment and Suspension Board. She then broadened her experience in government service as a subcommittee assistant general counsel and then general counsel for the House Armed Services Committee. Her next position was special assistant to the secretary of defense for legal matters, after which she served as the first deputy under secretary of defense for acquisition reform in 1993-1997.