APPENDIX E

NASA SHORT PAPER: “REVIEWING NASA'S SPACE SCIENCE SUPPORTING RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS,” NASA, OFFICE OF SPACE SCIENCE

Reviewing NASA's Space Science Supporting Research and Technology Programs

Introduction

The attainment of the long-range strategic goals of NASA's Office of Space Science (OSS) requires a constant interplay betweentheory, technology and instrument development, suborbital test, andanalysis of data from space science missions. These goals are enabledin large measure through the Supporting Research and Technology (SR&T) program, consisting of a broad portfolio of space science activitiesthat provides a variety of types of input critical to the achievementof OSS goals. Until recently the OSS SR&T program consisted of roughly40 separate program elements distributed across the disciplines ofastrophysics, space physics, and planetary research. To ensure thatthe SR&T program is making the most effective possible contributionto the OSS goals, OSS is in the process of instituting a triennialreview of the program. The process for this review is described below.

Overview of NASA's Space Science SR&T Program

NASA's Space Science SR&T program supports more than 2,000 awards for a total of ~ $210Min Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Activities supported by the program rangefrom theory and modeling, through laboratory-based research, to thedevelopment and validation of new instruments. Other than for suborbitalinvestigations, however, the SR&T program does not develop flighthardware. As a step towards clarifying the role of the various SR&T program elements, the previous set of 40 individual SR&T elements and their current resources have recently been groupedinto 9 science “clusters” (see Table 1), each of which consisting of relatedscience or functional programs and managed by the Discipline Scientistsin NASA's OSS Research Division

Table 1: Science Cluster Names and Program Content Cross-Theme Theoryand Data Analysis Programs (a) Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) TheoryProgram, SEC Guest Investigator Program; (b) Astrophysics TheoryProgram, Astrophysics Data Program, Long-Term Space strophysics ResearchProgram

Solar and Heliospheric Sciences

Heliospheric Physics, Solar Physics SR&T, Solar Low Cost Access to Space

Geospace Sciences

Magnetospheric Physics; Ionospheric, Thermospheric, Mesospheric Physics;

Low Cost Access to Space Origin and Evolution of Solar System

Bodies

Cosmochemistry, Planetary Geology and Geophysics, Origins of SolarSystems, Mars

Data Analysis Program (DAP), Lunar DAP Planetary Systems Science

Planetary Astronomy, Near-Earth Objects, Planetary Atmospheres incl.

Suborbital Research, Observatory Support, Jupiter DAP



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 22
APPENDIX E NASA SHORT PAPER: “REVIEWING NASA'S SPACE SCIENCE SUPPORTING RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS,” NASA, OFFICE OF SPACE SCIENCE Reviewing NASA's Space Science Supporting Research and Technology Programs Introduction The attainment of the long-range strategic goals of NASA's Office of Space Science (OSS) requires a constant interplay betweentheory, technology and instrument development, suborbital test, andanalysis of data from space science missions. These goals are enabledin large measure through the Supporting Research and Technology (SR&T) program, consisting of a broad portfolio of space science activitiesthat provides a variety of types of input critical to the achievementof OSS goals. Until recently the OSS SR&T program consisted of roughly40 separate program elements distributed across the disciplines ofastrophysics, space physics, and planetary research. To ensure thatthe SR&T program is making the most effective possible contributionto the OSS goals, OSS is in the process of instituting a triennialreview of the program. The process for this review is described below. Overview of NASA's Space Science SR&T Program NASA's Space Science SR&T program supports more than 2,000 awards for a total of ~ $210Min Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Activities supported by the program rangefrom theory and modeling, through laboratory-based research, to thedevelopment and validation of new instruments. Other than for suborbitalinvestigations, however, the SR&T program does not develop flighthardware. As a step towards clarifying the role of the various SR&T program elements, the previous set of 40 individual SR&T elements and their current resources have recently been groupedinto 9 science “clusters” (see Table 1), each of which consisting of relatedscience or functional programs and managed by the Discipline Scientistsin NASA's OSS Research Division Table 1: Science Cluster Names and Program Content Cross-Theme Theoryand Data Analysis Programs (a) Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) TheoryProgram, SEC Guest Investigator Program; (b) Astrophysics TheoryProgram, Astrophysics Data Program, Long-Term Space strophysics ResearchProgram Solar and Heliospheric Sciences Heliospheric Physics, Solar Physics SR&T, Solar Low Cost Access to Space Geospace Sciences Magnetospheric Physics; Ionospheric, Thermospheric, Mesospheric Physics; Low Cost Access to Space Origin and Evolution of Solar System Bodies Cosmochemistry, Planetary Geology and Geophysics, Origins of SolarSystems, Mars Data Analysis Program (DAP), Lunar DAP Planetary Systems Science Planetary Astronomy, Near-Earth Objects, Planetary Atmospheres incl. Suborbital Research, Observatory Support, Jupiter DAP

OCR for page 22
Astrobiology and Planetary Instrumentation Exobiology, Astrobiology,Planetary Instrument Definition, Planetary Instrument Upgrade, PlanetaryProtection Astrophysics Infrared/Radio/Interferometry Astronomy; UV/Visible Astrophysics;Space Astrophysics Detectors, Astrophysics Suborbital research High Energy Astrophysics X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, Cosmic Ray, and GravitationalAstrophysics (incl. instrumentation, laboratory and suborbital research) Information Systems Applied Information System Research Review Process In order to ensure that the SR&T program is making the most effective possible contribution to ourgoals, OSS will convene a series of reviews, called the “SR&T SeniorReviews,” the first of which will be held in June or July 2001. Furtherreviews will follow at three-year intervals. At the review, reportson each cluster will be presented that describe the content of thecluster, its relevance to the goals in the most recent Space ScienceEnterprise Strategic Plan, highlights of a few recent significantaccomplishments, and previews of ongoing efforts. These reports willbe reviewed by a panel consisting of active researchers with recentresearch efforts in two or more of the science clusters, who willhave been selected for their breadth and impartiality, rather thanas advocates for any specific SR&T cluster. Panel members will beasked to address three questions: (1) is the current science clusterstructure optimal for attaining the long-term strategic goals ofthe Space Science? Are cross-disciplinary research areas adequatelyaccessible? (2) what is the science quality and productivity of eachscience cluster, and to what degree does each cluster support orenable the strategic goals and objectives of the Space Science Enterprise?,and (3) judging by the priorities in the strategic plan, is the currentfunding distribution across the nine science cluster the optimumone, or would the review panel recommend changes? OSS will take therecommendations of the Senior Review panel into account in determiningthe changes, if any, to be made in the SR&T program structure, andin formulating budget plans for the SR&T programs for Fiscal Year2002 and beyond. Using a combination of the usual annual reviewsof a portion of each program element, and this new triennial reviewof the overall SR&T program, OSS expects to maintain a productiveSR&T program that is at the same time clearly focused on and responsiveto the strategic goals and objectives of the Space Science Enterprise.