Introduction and Goals

Roger C. Prince,a Linda Kupfer,b and Maryanna Henkertc

This 2-day workshop is the culmination of a study of the status and future of marine biotechnology. The overall goal of this workshop is to examine what was initially called “Opportunities for Marine Biotechnology in the United States,” to consider where we are now in this field of “Environmental Marine Biotechnology,” to envision the field in the future, and to discuss any impediments that might be encountered along the way. We hope that participants will address the question of where the federal government should invest its limited funds and what future initiatives should be planned.

The agencies that initially commissioned this study were the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Sea Grant College Program, National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, and Electric Power Research Institute.

Marine biotechnology is coordinated at the federal level through the Office of Science and Technology of the President under the direction of the National Science and Technology Council, which has five Council

a  

Corporate Research Laboratory, Exxon/Mobil Research & Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ

b  

National Sea Grant College Program, OAR, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, US Department of Commerce, Silver Spring, MD

c  

Division of Molecular & Cellular Biosciences, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA



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OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF MARINE BIOTECHNOLOGY: PROCEEDINGS OF THE OCTOBER 5-6, 1999, WORKSHOP Introduction and Goals Roger C. Prince,a Linda Kupfer,b and Maryanna Henkertc This 2-day workshop is the culmination of a study of the status and future of marine biotechnology. The overall goal of this workshop is to examine what was initially called “Opportunities for Marine Biotechnology in the United States,” to consider where we are now in this field of “Environmental Marine Biotechnology,” to envision the field in the future, and to discuss any impediments that might be encountered along the way. We hope that participants will address the question of where the federal government should invest its limited funds and what future initiatives should be planned. The agencies that initially commissioned this study were the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Sea Grant College Program, National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, and Electric Power Research Institute. Marine biotechnology is coordinated at the federal level through the Office of Science and Technology of the President under the direction of the National Science and Technology Council, which has five Council a   Corporate Research Laboratory, Exxon/Mobil Research & Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ b   National Sea Grant College Program, OAR, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, US Department of Commerce, Silver Spring, MD c   Division of Molecular & Cellular Biosciences, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA

OCR for page 1
OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF MARINE BIOTECHNOLOGY: PROCEEDINGS OF THE OCTOBER 5-6, 1999, WORKSHOP committees that coordinate scientific activities throughout the federal government. The Committee on Science oversees marine biotechnology; the Subcommittee on Biotechnology and its Biotechnology Research Working Group oversee the Marine Biotechnology Task Force. This arrangement allows the Marine Biotechnology Task Force to meet as often as necessary, with a small group of interested people at the working level, to discuss current and planned activities, such as this workshop, and future initiatives to coordinate the federal investment in marine biotechnology. The reports that follow highlight the most recent research results and leading edge ideas for applying the tools of biotechnology to the study of the marine environment. The discussions will surely help the responsible federal agencies to plan for future opportunities in research and applications of marine biotechnology.