National Academies Press: OpenBook

Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition (2001)

Chapter: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
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Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

ROBERT A.MOFFITT (Chair) is a professor in the Department of Economics and the Department of Population Dynamics at Johns Hopkins University. He is an affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and a senior associate and member of the External Advisory Committee for the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center on Poverty Research. He is a member of the American Economic Association, the Econometric Society, the Population Association of America, and the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. He has published extensively in his field, particularly in the areas of labor economics, econometrics, public economics, and population economics. He received a B.A. in economics from Rice University and master’s and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Brown University.

JOHN L.ADAMS is a senior statistician and head of the Statistical Consulting Service of the Statistics Group at RAND. Previously, he was a statistician for the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs and a research associate for the Management Information Division at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include statistical computing, data analysis, experimental design, and forecasting. He is a member of the American Statistical Association and received a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Minnesota.

CONSTANCE F.CITRO is a senior staff member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/ National Science Foundation research fellow at the Bureau of the Census. For

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
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the committee, she has served as study director for numerous panels, including the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the quality and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income and poverty measurement. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University.

THOMAS CORBETT is associate director of the Institute for Research on Poverty and senior scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has been involved at all levels of government in policy analysis and the development and evaluation of social welfare programs for over two decades. His research activities have focused on program administration and implementation and on the historical evolution of welfare issues, policies, and strategies in the United States. He received a Ph.D. in social welfare from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

JOHN L.CZAJKA is a senior sociologist at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Much of his research has focused on statistical uses of administrative records and the design and analysis of longitudinal data. He is a member of the American Statistical Association, the Population Association of America, and the Washington Statistical Society. Czajka received a B.A. in government from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

KATHRYN EDIN is an associate professor of the Department of Sociology and the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. Before joining the university, she was associate professor of the Department of Sociology and the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania, an assistant professor of the Department of Sociology and the Center for Urban Policy Research at Rutgers University, and a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. Her research interests include qualitative methods, social policy, gender, race, family studies, and urban sociology. Edin is also an associate fellow of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and of the Joint Center for Poverty Research at Northwestern University/University of Chicago. She received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Northwestern University.

IRWIN GARFINKEL is the Mitchell I.Ginsburg professor of contemporary urban problems at Columbia University School of Social Work. Previous positions held include professor and director of the school of social work and research member and director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
×
Wisconsin, Madison. He is also an affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and a senior affiliate of the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research. His research interests include social policy, child support, and single-parent families, and he has published extensively in these fields. He received a Ph.D. in social work and economics from the University of Michigan.

ROBERT M.GOERGE, associate director and research fellow at the Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, analyzes the experiences of children and families in the human service system in order to affect policy and program development at the state and national levels. His primary goal has been to describe these experiences over time and across the range of services, so that the complete experience of the child or family is understood. In order to do this, he developed the Integrated Database on Children and Family Services in Illinois, which makes use of computerized administrative data gathered by public agencies. This work is being replicated in other states with Chapin Hall’s assistance. Dr. Goerge also co-led the development of the Multistate Foster Care Data Archive, which described the foster care histories of nearly two-thirds of the children in the United States. His recent and current work includes a study of the effect of teenage childbearing on child maltreatment and foster care, and an analysis of how children’s need for human services is affected by welfare reform. He received master’s and Ph.D. degrees in social policy from the University of Chicago.

ERIC A.HANUSHEK is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. Previously he was a professor of economics and of public policy and director of the W. Allen Wallis Institute of Political Economy at the University of Rochester. He was formerly deputy director of the Congressional Budget Office and is a past president of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. He previously held academic appointments at Yale University and the U.S. Air Force Academy and governmental appointments at the Cost of Living Council and the Council of Economic Advisers. He is an associate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research involves applied public finance and public policy analysis with special emphasis on education issues. He has also investigated the determination of individual incomes and wages, retirement income security, housing policy, social experimentation, statistical methodology, and the economics of discrimination. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

V.JOSEPH HOTZ is a professor and chair of the Department of Economics at UCLA. He is a national research associate of the Northwestern University/ University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research and chaired the center’s

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
×
Advisory Panel for Research Uses of Administrative Data. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of the Board of Overseers of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and chair of the Oversight Board of California Census Research Data Center. His research focuses on the economics of the family, applied econometrics, and the evaluation of social programs. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

RICHARD A.KULKA is senior research vice president of statistics, health, and social policy at the Research Triangle Institute. Prior to his current appointment, he was senior vice president for survey research at the National Opinion Research Center. He has been involved in the design, conduct, and analysis of numerous statistical surveys on health, mental health, and other social policy issues for over two decades, while also conducting a broad range of applied research on survey research methods in these areas. Kulka is a member of several professional associations, including the American Statistical Association, the American Association for Public Opinion Research, and the American Public Health Association. He received a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan.

REBECCA A.MAYNARD is trustee professor of education and social policy at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to her appointment, she served as senior vice president and director of research at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. While at Mathematica, she spent over 18 years designing and evaluating education, employment, and welfare policies and programs. She has served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on welfare reform and to the U.S. General Accounting Office and the Rockefeller Foundation on various social welfare projects. She received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

SUZANNE M.RANDOLPH is an associate professor of family studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. In addition, she is co-project director of the Head Start Violence Prevention Project at the university, and a co-principal investigator on the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development and the Johns Hopkins University study on the ecology of African American children’s development. Her research interests include the normative development of African American infants, toddlers, and preschoolers and culturally responsive evaluation of community-based programs for African American families and other families of color. Randolph is a member of the Society for Research in Child Development and received a B.S. degree in psychology from Howard University and master’s and Ph.D. degrees in developmental psychology from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
×

WERNER SCHINK recently retired as the chief of research for the California Department of Social Services, where he was responsible for California’s extensive welfare reform demonstration projects. In addition, his responsibilities included oversight of the evaluations that are being conducted by the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, Schink held positions as chief of California’s $325 million Job Training Partner-ship Act program and chief economist for California’s Employment Development Department. Schink is a member and past president of the National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics, an organization comprised of researchers and statisticians from state and local social services agencies. He received an M.A. from the University of California, Davis.

MICHELE VER PLOEG is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics and serves as study director for this panel. Her research interests include the effects of social policies on families and children, the outcomes of children who experience poverty and changes in family composition, and individuals’ education attainment choices. She received a B.A. in economics from Central College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in consumer economics and housing from Cornell University.

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10020.
×
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Reform of welfare is one of the nation's most contentious issues, with debate often driven more by politics than by facts and careful analysis. Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition identifies the key policy questions for measuring whether our changing social welfare programs are working, reviews the available studies and research, and recommends the most effective ways to answer those questions.

This book discusses the development of welfare policy, including the landmark 1996 federal law that devolved most of the responsibility for welfare policies and their implementation to the states. A thorough analysis of the available research leads to the identification of gaps in what is currently known about the effects of welfare reform.

Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition specifies what-and why-we need to know about the response of individual states to the federal overhaul of welfare and the effects of the many changes in the nation's welfare laws, policies, and practices.

With a clear approach to a variety of issues, Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition will be important to policy makers, welfare administrators, researchers, journalists, and advocates on all sides of the issue.

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