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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Definition of Pain and Distress and Reporting Requirements for Laboratory Animals: Proceedings of the Workshop Held June 22, 2000. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10035.
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Appendix F

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Joanne Zurlo (Chair) is Associate Director, Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Her research interests have been in the areas of chemical carcinogenesis, molecular biology, and in vitro toxicology. She has held faculty positions at Dartmouth Medical School in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and at Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences.

Adele Douglass is Director of Public Policy for the American Humane Association. She is experienced in public policy concerning the use of animals in research and in agriculture. She has a broad range of knowledge of animal welfare issues, including agriculture and biomedical research uses of animals and is a recognized expert on animal welfare and the public's perception of those issues.

Randall J. Nelson is a Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, University of Tennessee. He is a neuroscientist and an expert in the use of nonhuman primates. His studies concern the role of the somatosensory cortex in receiving peripheral sensory information, integrating it with various central inputs, and contributing to the control of movement.

William S. Stokes is Associate Director for Animal and Alternative Resources, Environmental Toxicology Program, NIEHS and co-chair of the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Validation of Alternative Methods. His research interests are toxicological methods, including development, validation, and acceptance of new animal models, and improved toxicological test systems.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Definition of Pain and Distress and Reporting Requirements for Laboratory Animals: Proceedings of the Workshop Held June 22, 2000. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10035.
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Jerrold Tannenbaum is Professor of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis. He did graduate work in philosophy at Rockefeller University and Cornell University and obtained his JD from Harvard Law School. He is the author of numerous papers on veterinary and animal law and ethics, has written Veterinary Ethics, the first and only comprehensive book on veterinary ethics, and has spoken on ethical and legal issues relating to animals to a variety of audiences ranging from veterinary students to humane societies.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Definition of Pain and Distress and Reporting Requirements for Laboratory Animals: Proceedings of the Workshop Held June 22, 2000. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10035.
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Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Definition of Pain and Distress and Reporting Requirements for Laboratory Animals: Proceedings of the Workshop Held June 22, 2000. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10035.
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In this first in a proposed series of workshops on regulatory issues in animal care and use, the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) has addressed the existing and proposed requirements for reporting pain and distress in laboratory animals. The Animal Welfare Act, administered by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), mandates that pain and distress in laboratory animals be minimized. USDA is considering two policy changes with regard to this specific mandate. Firstly, since there has been no functional definition of "distress," USDA has prepared such a definition and requested feedback from the scientific community on its usefulness for regulatory and reporting requirements.

The second issue concerns the pain and distress categorization scheme for reporting to USDA. Various groups and individuals have questioned the efficacy of the current categories, and specific changes have been proposed by the Humane Society of the United States. USDA is considering these and other potential changes to the existing scheme. Thus, given these potential changes to animal welfare policy, the aim of the ILAR/NIH joint workshop was to provide feedback to the USDA. The speakers were asked to address these two issues as well as to comment upon whether the information contained in the 1992 ILAR report Recognition and Alleviation of Pain and Distress in Laboratory Animals is still useful to investigators in assisting them to comply with regulations. The speakers provided perspectives based on their individual expertise in the areas of science of pain and distress, animal welfare policy, protocol review, and/or as representatives of relevant organizations or institutions. The following proceedings are an edited transcript of their presentations.

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