National Academies Press: OpenBook

Conceptual Models of Flow and Transport in the Fractured Vadose Zone (2001)

Chapter: Appendix B: Invited Presentations

« Previous: Appendix A: Workshop Attendees
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Invited Presentations." National Research Council. 2001. Conceptual Models of Flow and Transport in the Fractured Vadose Zone. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10102.
×

Appendix B

Invited Presentations

General Overview of Conceptual Models, Leslie Smith

Evolution of Conceptual Model for Yucca Mountain, Alan Flint

Conceptual Model of Vadose-Zone Transport in Fractured Weathered Shale, Philip M. Jardine, G. V. Wilson, and J. P. Gwo

Evaluation of Conceptual and Quantitative Models of Fluid Flow and Chemical Transport in Fractured Media, Brian Berkowitz, Ronit Nativ, and Eilon Adar

Mechanisms of Preferential Flow in the Subsurface, Jan M. H. Hendrickx and Markus Flury

Modeling Macropore Flow in Soils: Field Validation and Use for Management Purposes, Nicholas Jarvis and Martin Larsson

Mechanisms of Fracture Flow and Fracture-Matrix Interactions, Joe Wang

Free-Surface Flow, Maria Ines Dragila and Stephen W. Wheatcraft

Fracture Network Geometry, Tom Doe

Investigating Flow and Transport in the Fractured Vadose Zone Using Environmental Tracers, Fred M. Phillips

Lessons from Field Studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in Arizona, Shlomo P. Neuman, Walter A. Illman, Velimir V. Vesselinov, Dick L. Thompson, A. Guzman

Parameterization and Upscaling, Bo Bodvarsson

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Invited Presentations." National Research Council. 2001. Conceptual Models of Flow and Transport in the Fractured Vadose Zone. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10102.
×
Page 371
Next: Appendix C: Panel Biographies »
Conceptual Models of Flow and Transport in the Fractured Vadose Zone Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $75.00 Buy Ebook | $59.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Fluid flow and solute transport within the vadose zone, the unsaturated zone between the land surface and the water table, can be the cause of expanded plumes arising from localized contaminant sources. An understanding of vadose zone processes is, therefore, an essential prerequisite for cost-effective contaminant remediation efforts. In addition, because such features are potential avenues for rapid transport of chemicals from contamination sources to the water table, the presence of fractures and other channel-like openings in the vadose zone poses a particularly significant problem, Conceptual Models of Flow and Transport in the Fractured Vadose Zone is based on the work of a panel established under the auspices of the U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics. It emphasizes the importance of conceptual models and goes on to review the conceptual model development, testing, and refinement processes.

The book examines fluid flow and transport mechanisms, noting the difficulty of modeling solute transport, and identifies geochemical and environmental tracer data as important components of the modeling process. Finally, the book recommends several areas for continued research.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!