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Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises (2002)

Chapter: Appendix C Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10136.
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C
Workshop Agenda

Abrupt Climate Change: Science & Public Policy Workshop

October 30-31, 2000

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Monday, October 30th

7:30 a.m.

Registration

 

8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

 

8:30 a.m.

Welcome and Introduction

Richard Alley

8:45 a.m.

Keynote address

Wallace Broecker

9:30 a.m.

Evidence of abrupt climate change

Jeff Severinghaus

10:00 a.m.

Discussion

Jean Lynch-Stieglitz

10:30 a.m.

Break

 

10:45 a.m.

Mechanisms of abrupt climate change

Mark Cane

11:15 a.m.

Discussion

Issac Held

11:45 a.m.

Working Lunch

 

12:45 p.m.

Impacts of abrupt climate change

David Bradford

1:15 p.m.

Discussion

Gary Yohe

1:45 p.m.

Introduction of charge for Breakout group 1

Richard Alley

2:00 p.m.

Breakout group 1

 

4:00 p.m.

Wrap-up of Breakout group 1

 

5:00 p.m.

Adjourn for the day

 

5:15 p.m.

Reception–Lamont Hall

 

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10136.
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Tuesday, October 31st

8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

 

8:30 a.m.

Introduction to the day’s events

Richard Alley

9:00 a.m.

Ongoing observations

Bob Dickson

9:30 a.m.

Discussion

Peter Schlosser

10:00 a.m.

Simulations of abrupt climate change

Sylvie Joussaume

10:30 a.m.

Discussion

John Kutzbach

11:00 a.m.

Break

 

11:15 a.m.

Atmospheric dynamics

Grant Branstator

11:45 a.m.

Discussion

Tony Broccoli

12:15 p.m.

Working Lunch

 

1:15 p.m.

Policy advice

William Ascher

1:45 p.m.

Discussion

Karen Smoyer

2:15 p.m.

Introduction to Breakout group 2

Richard Alley

2:30 p.m.

Breakout group 2

 

4:00 p.m.

Wrap-up of Breakout group 2

 

5:00 p.m.

Closing remarks

Richard Alley

5:30 p.m.

Meeting Adjourns

 

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10136.
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Page 212
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10136.
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Page 213
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The climate record for the past 100,000 years clearly indicates that the climate system has undergone periodic--and often extreme--shifts, sometimes in as little as a decade or less. The causes of abrupt climate changes have not been clearly established, but the triggering of events is likely to be the result of multiple natural processes.

Abrupt climate changes of the magnitude seen in the past would have far-reaching implications for human society and ecosystems, including major impacts on energy consumption and water supply demands. Could such a change happen again? Are human activities exacerbating the likelihood of abrupt climate change? What are the potential societal consequences of such a change?

Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises looks at the current scientific evidence and theoretical understanding to describe what is currently known about abrupt climate change, including patterns and magnitudes, mechanisms, and probability of occurrence. It identifies critical knowledge gaps concerning the potential for future abrupt changes, including those aspects of change most important to society and economies, and outlines a research strategy to close those gaps.

Based on the best and most current research available, this book surveys the history of climate change and makes a series of specific recommendations for the future.

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