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Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot (2001)

Chapter: Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile." National Research Council. 2001. Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10182.
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Appendixes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile." National Research Council. 2001. Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10182.
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This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile." National Research Council. 2001. Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10182.
×

Appendix A
Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile

Figures A-1 through A-3 are cutaway drawings of the 105-mm shell, 155-mm shell, and 4.2-inch mortar projectiles. Information is also included on the size, weight, energetics, and packaging of each projectile.

The stockpile inventory at Pueblo Chemical Depot consists entirely of munitions containing mustard agent. Most of the projectiles contain mustard agent HD (distilled ß,ß'-dichloroethyl sulfide). Some contain mustard agent HT, a 60:40 eutectic mixture of HD and bis(2-[2-chloroethylthio]ethyl)ether. All of the munitions may contain some degradation products and inorganic residues.

REFERENCE

U.S. Army. 1977. Army Ammunition Data Sheets: Artillery Ammunition, Guns, Howitzers, Mortars, Recoilless Rifles, Grenade Launchers, and Artillery Fuzes (FSC 1310, 1315, 1320, 1390). TM 43–0001–28. April 1977. Washington, D.C.: Headquarters, U.S. Army.

M60 Cartridge, 105-mm Howitzer

Length

31.1 inches

Booster

M22

Diameter

105 mm

Explosive

Tetrytol

Total weight

42.92 lb

Explosive weight

0.3 lb

Agent

HD

Propellant

M67

Agent weight

2.97 lb

Propellant weight

2.83 lb

Fuze

M557/M51A5

Primer

M28A2/M28B2

Burster

M5

Packaging

1 round/fiber container, 2 container/wooden box

FIGURE A-1 105-mm howitzer projectile. Note: M60 105-mm cartridges have been reconfigured and therefore will not have propellant attached. Source: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile." National Research Council. 2001. Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10182.
×

M110 Projectile, 155-mm Howitzer

Length

31.1 inches

Booster

M22

Diameter

155 mm

Explosive weight

0.41 lb

Total weight

94.6 lb

Propellant

None

Agent

HD

Propellant weight

None

Agent weight

11.7 lb

Primer

None

Fuze

None

Packaging

8 rounds/wooden pallet

Burster

M6

 

 

FIGURE A-2 155-mm howitzer projectile. Source: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

Cartridge, 4.2-inch Cartridge/Mortar

 

M2/HT

M2A1/HD

Length

21.0 inches

21.0 inches

Diameter

4.2 inches

4.2 inches

Total weight

24.67 lb

24.67 lb

Agent

HT

HD

Agent weight

5.8 lb

6.0 lb

Fuze

M8

M8

Burster

M14

M14

Explosive

Tetryl

Tetryl

Explosive weight

0.14 lb

0.14 lb

Propellant

M6

M6

Propellant weight

0.6 lb

0.4 lb

Primer

M2

M2

Packaging

1 round/fiber container, 2 containers/wooden box

1 round/fiber container, 2 containers/wooden box

FIGURE A-3 4.2-inch mortar cartridge. Note: 4.2-inch cartridges/mortars will be reconfigured as projectiles. Most 4.2-inch cartridges will also be defuzed. Source: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile." National Research Council. 2001. Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10182.
×
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile." National Research Council. 2001. Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10182.
×
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile." National Research Council. 2001. Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10182.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Description of Munitions in the Pueblo Chemical Depot Stockpile." National Research Council. 2001. Analysis of Engineering Design Studies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons at Pueblo Chemical Depot. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10182.
×
Page 82
Next: Appendix B: SCWO Reliability and Maintenance (RAM) Log for 500-Hour HD »
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The Program Manager for Assembled Chemical Weapons Assessment (PMACWA) of the Department of Defense (DOD) requested the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the engineering design studies (EDSs) developed by Parsons/Honeywell and General Atomics for a chemical demilitarization facility to completely dispose of the assembled chemical weapons at the Pueblo Chemical Depot in Pueblo, Colorado. To accomplish the task, the NRC formed the Committee on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons: Phase II (ACW II Committee). This report presents the results of the committee's scientific and technical assessment, which will assist the Office of the Secretary of Defense in selecting the technology package for destroying the chemical munitions at Pueblo.

The committee evaluated the engineering design packages proposed by the technology providers and the associated experimental studies that were performed to validate unproven unit operations. A significant part of the testing program involved expanding the technology base for the hydrolysis of energetic materials associated with assembled weapons. This process was a concern expressed by the Committee on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons (ACW I Committee) in its original report in 1999 (NRC, 1999). The present study took place as the experimental studies were in progress. In some cases, tests for some of the supporting unit operations were not completed in time for the committee to incorporate results into its evaluation. In those cases, the committee identified and discussed potential problem areas in these operations. Based on its expertise and its aggressive data-gathering activities, the committee was able to conduct a comprehensive review of the test data that had been completed for the overall system design. This report summarizes the study.

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