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Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes (2001)

Chapter: Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10185.
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Page 137

Appendixes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10185.
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Page 138

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10185.
×

Page 139

Appendix A Coalition Forces and ForceStrength

Total U.S. forces deployed—697,000. Peak personnel strength—541,400.

Total other coalition forces—259,700 at peak personnel strength.

Country

Number

Country

Number

Afghanistan

300

Norway

50

Argentina

300

Oman

6,300

Australia

700

Pakistan

4,900

Bahrain

400

Philippines

unknown

Bangladesh

2,200

Poland

200

Belgium

400

Qatar

2,600

Canada

2,000

Romania

unknown

Czechoslovakia

200

Saudi Arabia

100,000

Denmark

100

Senegal

500

Egypt

33,600

Sierra Leone

unknown

France

14,600

Singapore

unknown

Germany

unknown

South Korea

200

Greece

200

Spain

500

Hungary

50

Sweden

unknown

Italy

1,200

Syria

14,500

Japan

unknown

Thailand

unknown

Kuwait

9,900

Turkey

unknown

Morocco

13,000

UAE

4,300

Netherlands

600

UK

45,400

New Zealand

unknown

United States

697,000

Niger

600

Zaire

unknown

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10185.
×

Page 140

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10185.
×
Page 137
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10185.
×
Page 138
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10185.
×
Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Coalition Forces and Force Strength." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Gulf War Veterans: Treating Symptoms and Syndromes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10185.
×
Page 140
Next: Appendix B: Workshop Summary »
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Ten years after the end of the Gulf War, questions continue to be raised about the health of U.S. service personnel who fought in that war. A primary concern is whether Gulf War veterans are receiving effective treatments for their health problems. Section 105 of the Veterans Program Enhancement Act of 1998 mandates that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) ask the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to convene a committee that would identify a method for assessing treatment effectiveness and describe already-validated treatments for Gulf War veterans' health problems, including the problem of medically unexplained symptoms. The specific charge to the committee is to (1) identify and describe approaches for assessing treatment effectiveness; (2) identify illnesses and conditions among veterans of the Gulf War, using data obtained from the VA and the Department of Defense (DoD) Gulf War Registries, as well as information in published articles; and (3) for these identified conditions and illnesses, identify validated models of treatment (to the extent that such treatments exist), or identify new approaches, theories, or research on the management of patients with these conditions if validated treatment models are not available.

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