National Academies Press: OpenBook

Learning from Our Buildings: A State-of-the-Practice Summary of Post-Occupancy Evaluation (2001)

Chapter: Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3." National Research Council. 2001. Learning from Our Buildings: A State-of-the-Practice Summary of Post-Occupancy Evaluation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10288.
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Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3." National Research Council. 2001. Learning from Our Buildings: A State-of-the-Practice Summary of Post-Occupancy Evaluation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10288.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3." National Research Council. 2001. Learning from Our Buildings: A State-of-the-Practice Summary of Post-Occupancy Evaluation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10288.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3." National Research Council. 2001. Learning from Our Buildings: A State-of-the-Practice Summary of Post-Occupancy Evaluation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10288.
×
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3." National Research Council. 2001. Learning from Our Buildings: A State-of-the-Practice Summary of Post-Occupancy Evaluation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10288.
×
Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3." National Research Council. 2001. Learning from Our Buildings: A State-of-the-Practice Summary of Post-Occupancy Evaluation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10288.
×
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3." National Research Council. 2001. Learning from Our Buildings: A State-of-the-Practice Summary of Post-Occupancy Evaluation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10288.
×
Page 94

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Appendix C Supplemental Information to Chapter 3

APPENDIX C 89 Buildings-in-Use 271 Lincoln Street Lexington MA.02421 781-674-3186 phone 781-674-1489 fax Buildings-In-Use Boston Montreal December 20, 2001 I.D.Number ____/___/____ Please leave blank Welcome to the Building-In-Use Assessment Survey! This questionnaire is for all staff. We want to find out more about how you feel about the facility you work in, and how you feel this environment affects your work. Below you will find a checklist of items about your workspace. Please answer these questions as soon as you receive the questionnaire. It will take you less than 10 minutes to complete. When you have filled it out, please return it immediately. Please do not fill out the ID number on this survey form. It is used for analysis purposes. However, please provide your office location in the space provided, as this will help us understand the building conditions at your work location. Your name is not necessary on the questionnaire and your answers will remain confidential. We really want to hear from you. Thank-you for participating! PLEASE FILL OUT THE FOLLOWING: Office or cube number _________________ Floor _________ Workgroup or department name _______________________ Please rate your comfort level in your primary workspace on the following scales, where 1 is poor or uncomfortable and 5 is good or comfortable, and 2 3 - 4 are in-between, with 3 being neutral. Your task is to circle the number on each scale that best represents your experience of working in this building. 1. Temperature comfort: 1 2 3 4 5 GENERALLY BAD GENERALLY GOOD over . . . 1

90 LEARNING FROM OUR BUILDINGS Buildings-in-Use 2. How cold it gets: 1 2 3 4 5 TOO COLD COMFORTABLE 3. How warm it gets: 1 2 3 4 5 TOO WARM COMFORTABLE 4. Temperature shifts: 1 2 3 4 5 TOO FREQUENT GENERALLY CONSTANT 5. Ventilation comfort: 1 2 3 4 5 GENERALLY BAD GENERALLY GOOD 6. Air freshness: 1 2 3 4 5 STALE AIR FRESH AIR 7. Air Movement: 1 2 3 4 5 STUFFY CIRCULATING 8. Noise distractions: 1 2 3 4 5 DISTURBING NOT A PROBLEM 9. General office noise level (background noise from conversation and equipment): 1 2 3 4 5 TOO NOISY COMFORTABLE 10. Specific office noises (individual voices and equipment): 1 2 3 4 5 DISTURBING NOT A PROBLEM over . . . 2

APPENDIX C 91 Buildings-in-Use 11. Noise from the air systems: 1 2 3 4 5 DISTURBING NOT A PROBLEM 12. Noise from office lighting: 1 2 3 4 5 BUZZ/NOISY NOT A PROBLEM 13. Noise from outside the building: 1 2 3 4 5 DISTURBING NOT A PROBLEM 14. Furniture arrangement in your workspace: 1 2 3 4 5 UNCOMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE 15. Amount of space in your workspace: 1 2 3 4 5 INSUFFICIENT ADEQUATE 16. Work storage: 1 2 3 4 5 INSUFFICIENT ADEQUATE 17. Shared (team) file storage: 1 2 3 4 5 INSUFFICIENT ADEQUATE 18. Personal storage: 1 2 3 4 5 INSUFFICIENT ADEQUATE 19. Visual privacy in your workspace: 1 2 3 4 5 UNCOMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE over . . . 3

92 LEARNING FROM OUR BUILDINGS Buildings-in-Use 20. Voice privacy in your workspace: 1 2 3 4 5 UNCOMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE 21. Telephone privacy in your workspace: 1 2 3 4 5 UNCOMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE 22. Electrical Lighting: 1 2 3 4 5 UNCOMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE 23. How bright lights are: 1 2 3 4 5 TOO MUCH LIGHT DOES NOT GET TOO BRIGHT 24. Glare from lights or windows: 1 2 3 4 5 UNCOMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE 25. Natural lighting from windows: 1 2 3 4 5 INSUFFICIENT LIGHT GOOD NATURAL LIGHT 26. Not enough light: 1 2 3 4 5 TOO DARK COMFORTABLE 27. Please rate how this space affects your ability to do your work: 1 2 3 4 5 MAKES IT DIFFICULT MAKES IT EASY 28. How would you rate your satisfaction with this building? 1 2 3 4 5 DISSATISFIED VERY SATISFIED over . . . 4

APPENDIX C 93 Buildings-in-Use PLEASE COMMENT: 29. What I like best/find most useful about this building as a place to work : 30. What I dislike most/have most trouble with in this building as a place to work : 5

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In 1986, the FFC requested that the NRC appoint a committee to examine the field and propose ways by which the POE process could be improved to better serve public and private sector organizations. The resulting report, Post-Occupancy Evaluation Practices in the Building Process: Opportunities for Improvement, proposed a broader view of POEs-from being simply the end phase of a building project to being an integral part of the entire building process. The authoring committee recommended a series of actions related to policy, procedures, and innovative technologies and techniques to achieve that broader view.

In 2000, the FFC funded a second study to look at the state of the practice of POEs and lessons-learned programs among federal agencies and in private, public, and academic organizations both here and abroad. The sponsor agencies specifically wanted to determine whether and how information gathered during POE processes could be used to help inform decisions made in the programming, budgeting, design, construction, and operation phases of facility acquisition in a useful and timely way. To complete this study, the FFC commissioned a set of papers by recognized experts in this field, conducted a survey of selected federal agencies with POE programs, and held a forum at the National Academy of Sciences on March 13, 2001, to address these issues. This report is the result of those efforts.

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