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Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary (2002)

Chapter: Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
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Appendix A
Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Prepared Are We? Assessing the Science and Our Response Capabilities

November 27–29, 2001

Lecture Room

National Academy of Sciences

2101 Constitution Avenue, NW

Washington, DC 20418

AGENDA

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2001

8:30 am

Continental Breakfast

9:00

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Adel Mahmoud, Chair, Forum on Emerging Infections President, Merck Vaccines

Stanley Lemon, Vice-Chair, Forum on Emerging Infections Dean of Medicine, The University of Texas Branch at Galveston

9:15

Framing the Debate: Real-Time Considerations for Addressing Bioterrorism

Hon. William Frist, United States Senate

Anthony Fauci, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Edward Eitzen, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

James Hughes, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Michael Osterholm, University of Minnesota

Margaret Hamburg, Nuclear Threat Initiative

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
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Session I: Assessing Our Understanding of the Threats

Moderator: Joshua Lederberg, The Rockefeller University

10:15

Anthrax

Arthur Friedlander, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

10:45

Smallpox

Peter Jahrling, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

11:15

Tularemia and Plague

David Dennis, NCID, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

11:45

Botulinum Toxin

Stephen Arnon, Infant Botulism Treatment and Prevention Program, California Department of Health Services

12:15 pm

Innovative Surveillance Methods for Monitoring Dangerous Pathogens

Patrick Kelley, Walter Reed Army Institute for Research

1:00

Lunch

Session II: Vaccines: Development, Production, Supply, and Procurement Issues

Moderator: Carole Heilman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

2:00

Vaccines for Threatening Agents: Ensuring the Availability of Countermeasures to Bioterrorism

Philip Russell, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services

2:30

The Department of Defense and the Development and Procurement of Vaccines Against Dangerous Pathogens: A Role in the Military and Civilian Sector?

Anna Johnson-Winegar, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Chemical and Biological Matters

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×

3:00

Applications of Modern Technology to Emerging Infections and Vaccine Development

Gary Nabel, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Vaccine Research Center

3:30

Meeting the Regulatory and Product Development Challenges for Vaccines and Other Biologics to Address Terrorism

Jesse Goodman, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration

Session III: Discussion Panel of Biological Threats and the Research Implications

4:30

Moderator: Adel Mahmoud, Merck Vaccines

Donald Burke, Johns Hopkins University

Stanley Plotkin, Aventis Pasteur

Ken Alibek, Hadron, Inc.

6:30

Adjournment of the first day

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2001

8:00 am

Continental Breakfast

8:30

Opening Remarks / Summary of Day 1 Stanley Lemon, Vice Chair, Forum on Emerging Infections

Session IV: The Research Agenda and Emerging Technologies

Moderator: Gail Cassell, Eli Lilly and Company

9:30

The Role of Antivirals C.J. Peters, University of Texas-Galveston

10:00

New Research in Antitoxins John Collier, Harvard Medical School

10:30

Recombinant Human Antibody: Immediate Immunity for Botulinum Neurotoxin and Other Class A Agents

James Marks, University of California, San Francisco

11:00

Diagnostics and Detection Methods: Improving Rapid Response Capabilities

David Relman, Stanford University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×

11:30

Meeting the Regulatory and Product Development Challenges for Drugs to Address Terrorism

Andrea Meyerhoff, Office of the Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration

12:30 pm

Q & A Session/Working Lunch

Session V: The Response Infrastructure

Moderator: Michael Osterholm, University of Minnesota

1:30

Lessons Being Learned: The Challenges and Opportunities

Scott Lillibridge, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services

Julie Gerberding, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Bradley Perkins, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Kevin Yeskey, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

3:00

The Progress, Priorities, and Concerns of Public Health Laboratories

Mary Gilchrist, University Hygienic Laboratory, Iowa

3:30

Centers for Public Health Preparedness

Stephen S. Morse, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

4:00

The Role of Coordinated Information Dissemination: The CASCADE program in the United Kingdom

John Simpson, Head of Emergency Planning Co-ordination Unit, Department of Health, UK

4:30

The Legal Infrastructure for an Effective Public Health Response

David Fidler, Indiana University School of Law

Session VI: Discussion Panel of the Spectrum of Research and Public Health Responses

5:00

Moderator: James Hughes, NCID, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Michael Ascher, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services

Craig Watz, Federal Bureau of Investigation

Donald Wetter, U.S. Public Health Service

David Shlaes, Wyeth-Ayerst Research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×

 

Jerry Gibson, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control

Eric Eisenstadt, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Renu Gupta, Novartis

6:30

Closing Remarks /Adjournment

Stanley Lemon, Vice-Chair, Forum on Emerging Infections

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2001

8:30 am

Continental Breakfast

9:00

Opening Remarks Adel Mahmoud, Chair Stanley Lemon, Vice-Chair

Priorities for the Next Steps in Countering Bioterrorism

9:15 am

Panel Discussion

Moderator: Fred Sparling, UNC-Chapel Hill

Panelists:

D.A. Henderson, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services

Ruth Berkelman, Emory University

Scott Layne, UCLA

Susan Maslanka, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Kristi Koenig, Department of Veterans Affairs

Tom Milne, National Association of County and City Health Officials

Ronald Atlas, University of Louisville, President-Elect, American Society of Microbiology

11:15

Round-the-Table Discussion (Lunch will be served)

2:00 pm

Closing Remarks/Adjournment

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page 220
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page 221
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page 222
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page 223
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda: Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Preparted Are We?." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page 224
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In the wake of September 11th and recent anthrax events, our nation’s bioterrorism response capability has become an imminent priority for policymakers, researchers, public health officials, academia, and the private sector. In a three-day workshop, convened by the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Emerging Infections, experts from each of these communities came together to identify, clarify, and prioritize the next steps that need to be taken in order to prepare and strengthen bioterrorism response capabilities. From the discussions, it became clear that of utmost urgency is the need to cast the issue of a response in an appropriate framework in order to attract the attention of Congress and the public in order to garner sufficient and sustainable support for such initiatives. No matter how the issue is cast, numerous workshop participants agreed that there are many gaps in the public health infrastructure and countermeasure capabilities that must be prioritized and addressed in order to assure a rapid and effective response to another bioterrorist attack.

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